Message from the Lord Chief Justice: Diversity of the judiciary – 2020 statistics – Courts & Tribunals Judiciary

‘I welcome publication of the Judicial Diversity Forum’s combined statistical report. It brings together data on the diversity of the judiciary, judicial appointments and from the relevant professional bodies (the Law Society, the Bar Council and the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx).’

Full press release

Courts & Tribunals Judiciary, 17th September 2020

Source: www.judiciary.uk

Judicial diversity statistics show ‘significant disparity’ between solicitors and barristers – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Solicitors are significantly less likely to be appointed judges than barristers even though more solicitors than barristers are applying for posts, according to a landmark diversity report published today.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 17th September 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Do black lives matter in the employment justice system? – Garden Court Chambers

‘Paper produced by Mukhtiar Singh of the Garden Court Employment and Discrimination Law Team.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 14th September 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

EP 123: Judges and Lawyers: Enemies of the People? with Joshua Rozenberg – Law Pod UK

Posted September 3rd, 2020 in judiciary, legal profession, media, news, podcasts by sally

‘In Episode 123 Emma-Louise Fenelon talks to Joshua Rozenberg about his new book Enemies of the People? How Judges Shape Society and discusses attacks on judges and lawyers by the media and the government.’

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Law Pod UK, 1st September 2020

Source: audioboom.com

Against the law: why judges are under attack, by the Secret Barrister – The Guardian

‘Branded “enemies of the people” by the media and falsely accused of taking sides in Brexit by Conservative ministers, the judiciary is under threat – as is democracy.’

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The Guardian, 22nd August 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Relationships with counsel and chambers – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted July 28th, 2020 in bias, judiciary, news, recusal by sally

‘It is of fundamental importance that judicial decisions should be made free from bias or partiality – it has long been recognised that justice must not only be done but must also be seen to be done (R v Sussex Justices, ex parte McCarthy [1924] 1 KB 256). A judge must, therefore, recuse themselves in circumstances of actual or apparent bias.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 27th July 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Role of UK judges in Hong Kong appeal court comes under scrutiny – The Guardian

Posted July 3rd, 2020 in appeals, China, colonies, foreign jurisdictions, Hong Kong, judiciary, news by sally

‘The role of British judges who sit on Hong Kong’s highest court has come under intensive scrutiny as the new, Beijing-enforced national security law transforms the former colony’s legal freedoms.’

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The Guardian, 2nd July 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

How Judges Make their Decisions – is witness demeanour a myth? – Family Law Week

Posted July 2nd, 2020 in judiciary, juries, news, remote hearings, witnesses by tracey

‘Madeleine Whelan, barrister of Fourteen, considers how much weight judges might give to witnesses’ demeanour when evaluating their evidence in the light of a recent judgment by Mrs Justice Lieven.’

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Family Law Week, 29th June 2020

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Solicitor claimant backtracks on request for male judge – Legal Futures

‘An employment tribunal has rejected claims of bias by a solicitor claimant who asked and then retracted a request to replace a female judge with a male one.’

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Legal Futures, 23rd June 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Lewis Graham: Lessons from Lord Hope’s Diaries: judicial ideology and panel selection – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 18th, 2020 in judges, judiciary, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘Even in a more transparent and open Supreme Court, glimpses behind the curtain of officialdom are seldom offered to the public. This is understandable; the independence and impartiality of the judiciary sets it apart from other branches of the state. As Lord Neuberger (The Power of Judges, p.22) has noted, to be effective, “justice has always to be detached, almost Olympian”. We may know of judges in their official capacity, but once they adopt their robes, personal accounts of their day-to-day lives generally remain off-limits.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th June 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

First hijab-wearing UK court judge hopes to be ‘trailblazer’ – BBC News

‘A woman who is the first UK deputy district judge to wear a hijab said she hoped to be a “trailblazer”.’

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BBC News, 27th May 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

“Uphill battle” to engage judges in remote JR hearings – Litigation Futures

Posted May 12th, 2020 in judicial review, judiciary, news, remote hearings, telecommunications by sally

‘It is often impossible to sense how a judge is receiving submissions during remote judicial review hearings held during the Covid-19 lockdown, leading to confusion for advocates, a study has found.’

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Litigation Futures, 11th May 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Home Office accused of pressuring judiciary over immigration decisions – The Guardian

‘The Home Office has been accused of interfering with the independence of the judiciary after it emerged that judges were asked to provide written explanations for a rise in the number of detainees released from immigration centres during the Covid-19 pandemic.’

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The Guardian, 6th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Publication and correction of judgments – official and unofficial sources – Transparency Project

Posted April 29th, 2020 in courts, internet, judgments, judiciary, Ministry of Justice, news, tribunals by sally

‘Who is responsible for publishing the official approved version of judgments of the courts? Where should we look to find the latest, in some cases corrected, version of a court judgment? These are not new questions, but the sudden swerve to virtual justice has thrown them into new focus.’

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Transparency Project, 29th April 2020

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

Judiciary sets up working party to bring back jury trials – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted April 24th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, health, health & safety, judiciary, juries, news, trials by sally

‘The prospect of jury trials restarting has come closer with news that the judiciary has set up a working party to consider how they can be brought back as soon as it is safe to do so. The news comes shortly after lord chancellor Robert Buckland said he wanted jury trials back up and running as quickly as possible.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 24th April 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Covid-19 testing extended to frontline court staff and judges – Law Society’s Gazette

‘HM Courts & Tribunals Service says decisions on personal protective equipment are in line with official guidance following enquiries by the Gazette about what measures are being taken to protect staff at courts being kept open during the pandemic.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 21st April 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

EP 108: Renewed lockdown, new guidance: new episode – Dominic Ruck Keene & Darragh Coffey – Law Pod UK

‘Rosalind English talks to two barristers who happen to have served in the armed forces before going to the law, so they know something about emergencies and personal protective equipment. Dominic Ruck Keene and Darragh Coffey consider the probable attitude of the judiciary to any challenges regarding the government’s responsibility for preparedness, lockdown, and their their obligations under Articles 2 and 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights, as well as Article 11. How are we as a society, and the government, going to regard the question of “judicial activism” in this unprecedented situation in a post-pandemic UK?’

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Law Pod UK, 20th April 2020

Source: audioboom.com

Judges cannot be expected to undertake their full list remotely: senior members of judiciary warn – Local Government Lawyer

Posted April 16th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, judges, judiciary, live link evidence, news, trials by sally

‘All judges and leadership judges need to recognise that doing as much as possible remotely “does not mean, and cannot mean, trying to do everything remotely”, there senior members of the judiciary have warned.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 15th April 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Use of Artificial Intelligence by the Judiciary in the Face of COVID-19 – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘As one of the measures to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus, courts in major parts of the world are delaying trials and temporarily closing doors. While the move is reasonable in the face of the pandemic, the process could leave some cases in limbo for weeks, if not months. In the criminal context, this could be a huge barrier to access to justice for victims and in securing the rights of the accused. The Chief Justices of various judicial systems have issued guidance to trial courts seeking emergency orders to adjust or suspend court operations in light of the pandemic. In addition to these measures, new AI-based systems may prove helpful during these times and should, where available, be used to secure access to justice.’

Full Story

Oxford Human Rights Hub, 9th April 2020

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Judges to have wider powers in contempt rules rewrite – Litigation Futures

Posted March 11th, 2020 in civil procedure rules, contempt of court, court dress, judiciary, news by tracey

‘Judges could be handed wider powers to take the initiative over contempt of court in draft rules proposed by the Civil Procedure Rule Committee (CPRC).’

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Litigation Futures, 11th March 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com