Master calls on rules committee to solve riddle of the costs of budgeting – Litigation Futures

Posted August 16th, 2017 in budgets, civil procedure rules, costs, documents, judges, news by sally

‘A High Court Master has called on the Civil Procedure Rules Committee (CPRC) to resolve the “tension” between the need to “spell out in the eventual bill” the costs of costs budgeting and to include them in Precedent H.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th August 2017

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

DIY divorce form could lead to more adultery accusations, lawyers warn – Daily Telegraph

Posted August 14th, 2017 in divorce, documents, family courts, news by sally

‘A new “DIY” divorce form designed to speed up the process could lead to thousands more people being accused of adultery, lawyers warn.’

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Daily Telegraph, 10th August 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Pre-Action Correspondence: What to do if you get a Stroppy Letter ……. or worse – NIPC Law

‘On Wednesday I stressed the importance of pre-action correspondence and how the drafting of a letter before claim can make all the difference between getting what you want quickly and cheaply through focused negotiation and precipitating an expensive and possibly protracted law suit in Pre-Action Correspondence – Not Just a Box to be ticked or a Hoop to be jumped through 2 Aug 2017. Today, I shall tell you what to do if you receive a letter accusing you of infringing a patent or some other intellectual property right.’

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NIPC Law, 4th August 2017

Source: nipclaw.blogspot.co.uk

The cost of resisting disclosure of sensitive police material in family proceedings – UK Police Law Blog

‘Who pays the costs of Special Advocates where closed material procedures are required to consider sensitive police documents in family proceedings? The police, according to Cobb J in Re R (Closed Material Procedure: Special Advocates: Funding) [2017] EWHC 1793 (Fam).’

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UK Police Law Blog, 30th July 2017

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Reality Check: What does legally changing gender involve? – BBC News

Posted July 25th, 2017 in consultations, documents, driving licences, evidence, gender, news, passports by sally

‘It can take more than five years for trans men and women in England and Wales to legally change their gender under the current system.’

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BBC News, 24th July 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

EU citizenship: all at sea? – New Law Journal

‘Jonathan Kingham explores the UK’s ‘offer’ on residency for EU citizens.’

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New Law Journal, 21st July 2017

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Grenfell Tower— a different perspective – New Law Journal

‘Theo Huckle QC compares & contrasts the public safety policy agendas of administrations in Westminster & Wales.’

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New Law Journal, 7th July 2017

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Civil way – New Law Journal

‘Before I embark on this little tale, let me put you straight. So long as they act in good faith, as they always do, judges incur no liability for erroneous decisions. So that’s alright, then. And the Crown has no liability for anything done by any person discharging judicial responsibilities? Not quite, as highlighted by LL v The Lord Chancellor [2017] EWCA Civ 237, [2017] All ER (D) 123 (Apr). If a court orders a person to be arrested or detained in contravention of Art 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights then that person is entitled to damages in a claim against the Crown (ss 7(1) and 9 of the Human Rights Act 1998) and proceedings would have to be brought against the Lord Chancellor (as if he didn’t have enough to worry about already). Detention will be unlawful if the court acted without jurisdiction (which is why judges should take the Green Book with them wherever they go) or where there was a gross and obvious irregularity in the court’s procedure or a flagrant denial of justice.’

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New Law Journal, 7th July 2017

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

The Insolvency Rules 2016: an assault on red tape? – Hardwicke Chambers

‘The long-awaited overhaul of the Insolvency Rules 1986 (IR 1986) is now complete, and the Insolvency Rules 2016 (IR 2016) came into force on 6 April 2017. The journey to this point has not been without its difficulties and it would be fair to say that many had anticipated them being in force some time earlier. Perhaps unusually for provisions so overtly procedural in their nature, IR 2016 have also proved to be somewhat controversial.

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Hardwicke Chambers, 14th June 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Janine Wolstenholme Reviews a Recent Case on Relief from Sanctions – Park Square Barristers

‘The substantive claim was a straight forward, low value personal injury claim arising out of a road traffic accident. Liability was admitted. Trial directions were given, requiring witness statements to be served by 3rd November 2016. At the eleventh hour, the Claimant’s solicitors sought an extension of two weeks from the Defendant, which was agreed (an “indulgence” in the view of the judge on appeal).’

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Park Square Barristers, 27th June 2017

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Strike out of Claim due to Solicitor’s failure to comply with Court Orders – Park Square Barristers

‘In Reece Gladwin v Adrian Bogescu [2017] EWHC 1287 (QB) the Court was concerned with an appeal by the Defendant in a road traffic accident claim against a decision to grant the Claimant relief from sanctions, following late service of the Claimant’s witness evidence.’

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Park Square Barristers, 23rd June 2017

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Police who smeared victims in wake of Hillsborough disaster could face criminal charges, report suggests – Daily Telegraph

‘Criminal charges could be brought against police officers for smearing the victims of the Hillsborough disaster, it emerged today.’

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Daily Telegraph, 25th June 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

UKI (Kingsway) Ltd v Westminster City Council – WLR Daily

UKI (Kingsway) Ltd v Westminster City Council [2017] EWCA Civ 430

‘The freeholder of a building being redeveloped failed to agree with the local billing authority a date on which the building would be brought into the ratings list. The authority subsequently delivered to the manager of the building a completion notice addressed to “the owner” specifying a date. The manager, who was not authorised to accept legal documents on behalf of the freeholder, scanned the document and e-mailed a copy to the freeholder. When the building was entered onto the ratings list the freeholder appealed on the grounds that the completion notice was invalid and had not been validly served. Before the Court of Appeal the sole issue was the validity of service.’

WLR Daily, 15th June 2017

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Surrogacy Law / HFEA Update – Family Law Week

‘Andrew Powell, barrister of 4 Paper Buildings, considers recent surrogacy judgments and the latest cases concerning administrative errors relating to consent forms and the HFEA.’

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Family Law Week, 21st June 2017

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Council appeals £150k fine imposed over publication of sensitive data – Local Government Lawyer

‘Basildon Council has confirmed it is to appeal the imposition by the Information Commissioner of a £150,000 monetary penalty for publishing sensitive personal information about a family in planning application documents that were made publicly available online.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 20th June 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Leigh Day exonerated after longest and most expensive disciplinary tribunal prosecution ever – Legal Futures

‘The longest and most expensive case brought in the history of the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) has ended with high-profile claimant lawyer Martyn Day, two of his colleagues and his firm Leigh Day fully exonerated.’

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Legal Futures, 9th June 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Judge agrees natural father should not be given notice of care proceedings – Local Government Lawyer

‘A natural father need not be given a copy of a notice of care proceedings where this would create a risk for the mother, HHJ Bellamy has ruled in the Family Court.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 6th June 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Competition tribunal scolds Law Society over disclosure failure – Legal Futures

Posted June 7th, 2017 in competition, costs, disclosure, documents, indemnities, Law Society, news, tribunals by sally

‘The president of the Competition Appeal Tribunal (CAT) has reproached the Law Society for a “deeply unimpressive” explanation of its failure to disclose all the documents it should have done in the Socrates case.’

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Legal Futures, 7th June 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Solicitor fined for making false claims in litigation “while suffering mental illness” – Litigation Futures

‘A solicitor has been fined £7,500 for making false claims about being in possession of documents in personal injury cases – misconduct which a psychiatrist attributed to an illness that temporarily affected her ability to work.’

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Litigation Futures, 7th June 2017

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Unregistered barrister allowed to serve claim for LiP – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 24th, 2017 in barristers, documents, judges, litigants in person, news, service, third parties by sally

‘A litigant in person has been allowed to serve their claim through an unregistered barrister, despite protestations it was unlawful.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 22nd May 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk