Human Rights: Philosophy and History – Gresham College

Posted October 22nd, 2014 in human rights, legal history, magna carta, news, United Nations by sally

‘The philosophical and historical development of what may be regarded as essential human rights will be traced. It is essential to understand this development before criticising – or complaining about – modern Human Rights law.’

Transcript

Gresham College, 15th October 2014

Source: www.gresham.ac.uk

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British Jihadists and treason – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The news last week was that the Foreign Secretary has proposed a revival of a fourteenth century statute in order to prosecute British jihadists who travel to Iraq or Syria to fight. Cries of foul are coming from the usual quarters, and there’s even a protest that the Strasbourg Court would object, which, given the current controversy surrounding that tribunal, may be a good reason in itself for such a move.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st October 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Can a kiss on a bus count as public disorder? – The Guardian

Posted October 21st, 2014 in freedom of expression, homosexuality, human rights, news, public order by sally

‘The song was wrong – a kiss isn’t just a kiss. Or at least not on the No 89 to Blackheath, according to two passengers who say they were kicked off their London bus when the driver objected to their public display of affection.’

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The Guardian, 20th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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White collar crime reform considered – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The attorney general has revealed that the government is considering changing the evidential basis for prosecuting white collar crime.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 20th October 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Court refuses to say if killer was allowed to stay in UK – Daily Telegraph

‘Bernard Finlay was found guilty of stabbing a mother of two to death with three kitchen knives and a cleaver in 1997.’

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Daily Telegraph, 18th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Judge calls for more openness in controversial secret court – Daily Telegraph

‘District Judge Anselm Eldergill says Court of Protection should normally be open to the Press, in moves first mooted almost a year ago by another senior judge.’

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Daily Telegraph, 17th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Building a super-prison for children is a terrible idea – The Guardian

‘he Ministry of Justice’s bizarre plan includes a regime of physical punishment and restraint that would be a recipe for child abuse.’

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The Guardian, 17th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Grayling gives green light for staff to use force against inmates in new jail – The Guardian

‘Chris Grayling is to defy an appeal court judgement and order that staff should be able to use force to restrain teenage inmates for “the purposes of good order and discipline” at his proposed £85m privately run “super-child jail.” The proposed rule for the justice secretary’s 320-place “secure college” comes despite a court of appeal ruling in 2008 which banned the use of force after it was linked to the deaths and injury of several children in custody, including the death of a 14-year-old Gareth Myatt.’

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The Guardian, 16th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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The Costs of Complexity: A Practical View from the Bar – Littleton Chambers

Posted October 15th, 2014 in appeals, costs, human rights, news, nuisance, Supreme Court by sally

‘In his monthly column, originally published by PLC, James Bickford Smith considers the Supreme Court’s judgments in Coventry v Lawrence (No 2) [2014] UKSC 46 and Marley v Rawlings [2014] UKSC 51, before commenting briefly on relief from sanctions disputes after Denton v White and other appeals [2014] EWCA Civ 906.’

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Littleton Chambers, 3rd October 2014

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

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Binning the smoke alarm: Why repealing the Human Rights Act would be the biggest mistake of a generation – Doughty Street Chambers

‘Following plans announced at the Conservative Party’s recent conference to withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights, Harriet Johnson reminds us why we signed it in the first place, and underlines why it remains such an important safeguard over half a century later.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 3rd October 2014

Source: www.doughtystreet.co.uk

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The Supreme Court and the Rule of Law – Speech by Lord Neuberger

The Supreme Court and the Rule of Law (PDF)

Lord Neuberger

The Conkerton Lecture 2014, Liverpool Law Society, 9th October 2014

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

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Lord Neuberger on the Supreme Court: Five key cases from its first five years – The Independent

‘From euthanasia to high-speed rail, the highest in the land has an almost limitless remit.’

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The Independent, 12th October 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Revealed: The killers and rapists among 1,000 criminals launching compensation claims over prisoner voting – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 10th, 2014 in compensation, elections, human rights, news, prisons by sally

‘Identities of more than 1,000 convicted criminals who have brought legal challenges over Britain’s ban on inmates voting are disclosed by Strasbourg court for the first time.’

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Daily Telegraph, 9th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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The UK in the European Convention: fudge, or a shining example? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 10th, 2014 in constitutional law, EC law, human rights, jurisdiction, news, treaties by sally

‘Last night’s discussion at Gray’s Inn Hall featured a panel with Dominic Grieve QC MP (formerly Attorney General), Lord Judge (formerly Lord Chief Justice), Bella Sankey (Policy Director, Liberty), Martin Howe QC (member of the Commission on a British Bill of Rights), David Anderson QC (Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation), all chaired by Shaun Ley of the BBC.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 9th October 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Boy taken off life support after judge rules there is no hope of a ‘miracle’ dies – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 7th, 2014 in children, human rights, medical treatment, news by sally

‘The family of the 17-month-old are ‘devastated’ after his life-support machine was switched off against their wishes.’

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Daily Telegraph, 6th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Last week The Sun wanted to abolish the Human Rights Act, this week they want to use it to protect their journalists – The Independent

Posted October 7th, 2014 in human rights, investigatory powers, media, news by sally

‘Just days after The Sun newspaper celebrated David Cameron’s promise to abolish the Human Rights Act (HRA), it is using the very same laws to protect one of its own journalists.’

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The Independent, 6th October 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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European Convention on Human Rights: What has it ever done for us? – The Independent

‘As the Tories attempt to dilute the treaty’s authority in the UK, James Cusick takes a look at the difference it has made.’

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The Independent, 3rd October 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Conservatives plan to scrap Human Rights Act – read the full document – The Guardian

Posted October 6th, 2014 in human rights, jurisdiction, news, political parties by sally

‘Chris Grayling’s eight-page strategy paper ‘Protecting human rights in the UK’ promises to ‘restore sovereignty to Westminster’ through a parliamentary override, breaking the formal link between British courts and the European court of human rights.’

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The Guardian, 3rd October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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The Fragility of Human Rights – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 6th, 2014 in constitutional law, human rights, jurisdiction, news, political parties by sally

‘The announcement this week of a new Conservative Party plan to repeal the Human Rights Act, ‘Protecting Human Rights in the UK’, has brought to a boil a cauldron of incredulity (pictured) about the Government’s attitude towards the law. The response from human rights lawyers and advocacy groups has been swift. Liberty describes the Conservative Party plan as ‘legally illiterate’. The several ways in which that is true have already been the subject of detailed exposition. Indeed, Liberty’s response is even more accurate than it might first appear. If the Conservative Party plan is legally illiterate then it is best read as a political tactic to assure its supporters that it is the party of anti-European sentiment.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 5th October 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Council’s decision to close elderly care home not unlawful – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 3rd, 2014 in care homes, equality, human rights, judicial review, local government, news by tracey

‘Karia, R (on the application of) v Leicester City Council (Sir Stephen Silber, acting as High Court Judge) [2014] EWHC 3105 (Admin) (30 September 2014. In a robust judgment Sir Stephen Silber has asserted that neither the ordinary laws of judicial review, nor the Equality Act nor the Human Rights Act require the courts to micro-manage the decisions of public authorities. Indeed the latter two statutory powers are not designed as a back door into a merits review of a decision that is restricted to the court’s review of the legality of a public sector decision.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 2nd October 2014

Source: http://ukhumanrightsblog.com

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