Reconsideration of old human rights applications – Free Movement

Posted May 22nd, 2015 in appeals, human rights, immigration, news by sally

‘The Home Office has introduced a new policy on reconsideration of old human rights claims that were refused before 6 April 2015 with no right of appeal: Requests for reconsiderations of human rights or protection based claims refused without right of appeal before 6 April 2015. The policy is important in the very many cases where a human rights application was made by an individual or family and the application was refused with no right of appeal because no removal decision was made. Under the new appeals regime introduced by the Immigration Act 2014 from 6 April 2014, no removal decision is needed for a right of appeal, only refusal of a human rights claim.’
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Free Movement, 21st May 2015

Source: www.freemovement.co.uk

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The watchdog that would have scrutinised the end of the Human Rights Act just got quietly scrapped – The Independent

Posted May 22nd, 2015 in constitutional reform, EC law, human rights, magna carta, news, parliament by sally

‘The parliamentary committee that scrutinises proposed major constitutional changes been scrapped despite turbulent times ahead of the future of the United Kingdon’s governance.’

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The Independent, 21st May 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Polish Judicial Authorities v Celinski; Slovakian Judicial Authority v Cambal; Nida v Polish Judicial Authorities; Ciemiega v Polish Judicial Authorities; Regina (Inglot) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another; Polish Judicial Authorities v Pawelec – WLR Daily

Posted May 21st, 2015 in appeals, extradition, human rights, law reports by sally

Polish Judicial Authorities v Celinski; Slovakian Judicial Authority v Cambal; Nida v Polish Judicial Authorities; Ciemiega v Polish Judicial Authorities; Regina (Inglot) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another; Polish Judicial Authorities v Pawelec [2015] EWHC 1274 (Admin); [2015] WLR (D) 207

‘In extradition proceedings under Part I of the Extradition Act 2003 an appellate court, in answering the question whether a district judge had been wrong to decide that extradition was or was not proportionate with the requested person’s rights under article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, had to focus on whether the decision on proportionality itself was wrong.’

WLR Daily, 6th May 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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No duty of care to disclose to pregnant daughter father’s genetic disease – High Court – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In short, in 2007 the claimant’s father (‘F’) shot and killed the claimant’s mother. He was convicted of manslaughter on grounds of diminished responsibility and detained at a hospital run by the second defendant. In 2009 St George’s Hospital diagnosed him as suffering from Huntington’s disease.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 20th May 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Letting public authorities lose: The dangers of repealing the Human Rights Act – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted May 20th, 2015 in human rights, news, repeals by sally

‘With the post-election dust barely settled, the Human Rights Act is firmly in the Conservatives’ sights. Caught in the crosshairs is section 2 HRA, which requires UK courts to take into account, but not necessarily follow, the case law of the European Court of Human Rights.’
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UK Human Rights Blog, 19th May 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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HRA Watch: Reform, Repeal, Replace? Mark Elliott: Could the Devolved Nations Block Repeal of the Human Rights Act and the Enactment of a New Bill of Rights? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In my last post on the proposed repeal of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the enactment of a British Bill of Rights, I considered the extent to which the House of Lords might thwart the Government’s plans. My conclusion was that the Lords might plausibly assert itself so as to delay the legislation, traditional understandings of the Salisbury Convention notwithstanding, but that the Parliament Act 1911 clearly deprives the Lords of any absolute veto. What, however, of the devolved nations? Could they block the implementation of the UK Government’s proposals?’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th May 2015

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Mosley v Google: RIP – Panopticon

Posted May 19th, 2015 in data protection, EC law, human rights, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘So Max Mosley has done a deal with Google in respect of his claim that Google had breached his rights under the DPA 1998 by refusing to block certain images and videos accessible via the Google search engine (see this FT article which suggests that the settlement also applies to claims brought by Mr Mosley in Germany and France). The settlement of the claim, which follows on from Google’s failed strike out application (discussed further below), leaves unanswered a number of really important questions concerning the application of data protection rights in the online world. Not least, the settlement leaves open the question of the extent to which the so-called ‘right to be forgotten’ can operate so as to force internet search engines, not only to de-index individual URLs on request, but also to block access to the offending data globally (i.e. as ISEs already do, for example, where images of child pornography are identified).’

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Panopticon, 18th May 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Human Rights Act: What has it done for us? – The Independent

‘The Conservatives want to replace it. Here are five things it has implemented for good.’

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The Independent, 15th May 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Attorney General Dominic Grieve questions what Tories trying to achieve by replacing Human Rights Act with British Bill of Rights – The Independent

‘The former Attorney General Dominic Grieve has questioned what the Conservative Party is trying to achieve through its plan to replace the Human Rights Act with a new British Bill of Rights.’
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The Independent, 17th May 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Gaughran v Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (Secretary of State for the Home Department intervening – WLR Daily

Posted May 15th, 2015 in criminal records, DNA, human rights, law reports, Northern Ireland, police by tracey

Gaughran v Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (Secretary of State for the Home Department intervening: [2015] UKSC 29; [2015] WLR (D) 214

‘The policy in Northern Ireland, England and Wales of retaining indefinitely the DNA samples and other information obtained from persons who were arrested and subsequently convicted of an offence was proportionate and justified, and was within the margin of appreciation afforded to member states. A convicted person’s the right to respect for his private life guaranteed by article 8 of the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms was therefore not infringed when the police refused to give him an assurance that his DNA samples would be destroyed.’

WLR Daily, 13th May 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Retention of offenders’ DNA profiles not illegal, supreme court rules – The Guardian

Posted May 14th, 2015 in appeals, DNA, human rights, news, police, privacy, proportionality by tracey

‘Retaining DNA profiles of convicted adults indefinitely is not an illegal breach of their privacy, the supreme court has ruled in a test case involving a Northern Ireland drink driver. he judgment by the UK’s highest court sets a significant precedent in making a clear distinction between information that police forces may keep on those who have been convicted, as opposed to those who were merely suspects.’

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The Guardian, 13th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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In re MN (An Adult) (Court of Protection: Jurisdiction) – WLR Daily

In re MN (An Adult) (Court of Protection: Jurisdiction): [2015] EWCA Civ 411; [2015] WLR (D) 208

‘The function of the Court of Protection was to take, on behalf of adults who lacked capacity, the decisions which, if they had capacity, they would take themselves. The Court of Protection was thus confined to choosing between available options, including those which there was good reason to believe would be forthcoming in the foreseeable future and, in the final analysis, could not compel a public authority to agree to a care plan which the authority was unwilling to implement.’

WLR Daily, 7th May 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Lithuanian MPs petition Lords Speaker over child custody case – The Guardian

‘A delegation of Lithuanian MPs has written to the House of Lords complaining about the removal of a 12-year-old girl from her mother, alleging that she is being deprived of her cultural inheritance. The letter, sent to the Speaker of the House of Lords, Lady D’Souza, is the second high-profile intervention by a Baltic state in UK care proceedings this year and reflects a growing rift between EU states over practices in custody proceedings.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Regina (Agyarko) v Secretary of State for the Home Department; Regina (Evans) v Secretary of State for the Home Department; Regina (Ikuga) v Secretary of State for the Home Department – WLR Daily

Posted May 12th, 2015 in appeals, families, human rights, immigration, law reports, regulations by tracey

Regina (Agyarko) v Secretary of State for the Home Departmen; Regina (Evans) v Secretary of State for the Home Department; Regina (Ikuga) v Secretary of State for the Home Department: [2015] EWCA Civ 440; [2015] WLR (D) 205

‘Where a party who had overstayed unlawfully and married or formed a relationship with a British citizen sought leave to remain, the “insurmountable obstacles” test as to return under the Immigration Rules was a stringent test and more demanding than a mere test of whether it would be reasonable to expect a couple to continue their family life outside the United Kingdom, although the test was also to be interpreted in a sensible and practical rather than a purely literal way.’

WLR Daily, 6th May 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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SS (Congo) and others v Secretary of State for the Home Department – WLR Daily

SS (Congo) and others v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2015] EWCA Civ 387; [2015] WLR (D) 199

‘Where an application was made by a person for leave to enter the United Kingdom to join a spouse or family member who was a British citizen or refugee already residing there, but the application did not meet the minimum income or evidence of income requirements under the Immigration Rules for an application for leave to enter, compelling circumstances had to be shown to exist to justify the granting by the Secretary of State under her residual discretion of leave to enter outside the Immigration Rules on the grounds that refusal of entry would disproportionately interfere with the applicant’s article 8 Convention right to respect for family life.’

WLR Daily, 23rd April 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Breyer Group plc and others v Department of Energy and Climate Change; Free Power for Schools LP v Department of Energy and Climate Change; Homesun Holdings Ltd and another v Department of Energy and Climate Change; Touch Solar Ltd v Department of Energy and Climate Change – WLR Daily

Posted May 11th, 2015 in contracts, damages, energy, human rights, law reports, time limits by sally

Breyer Group plc and others v Department of Energy and Climate Change; Free Power for Schools LP v Department of Energy and Climate Change; Homesun Holdings Ltd and another v Department of Energy and Climate Change; Touch Solar Ltd v Department of Energy and Climate Change [2015] EWCA Civ 408; [2015] WLR (D) 192

‘Contracts which had been secured might be said to part of the goodwill of a business because they were the product of its past work, and thus capable of amounting to possessions within article 1 of the First Protocol to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Contracts which the business hoped to secure in the future were no more than that and were merely a potential source of future income which could not amount to possessions under the article.’

WLR Daily, 28th April 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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What is the Human Rights Act and why does Michael Gove want to scrap it? – The Independent

Posted May 11th, 2015 in human rights, news, political parties, treaties by sally

‘The Conservatives’ manifesto says the party wants to scrap the Human Rights Act. David Cameron has appointed Michael Gove, the former education secretary, to be Justice Secretary. This mean he’ll have most of the responsibility for policy over the area.’

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The Independent, 11th May 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Patel v Mussa – WLR Daily

Posted May 11th, 2015 in appeals, county courts, human rights, jurisdiction, law reports by sally

Patel v Mussa [2015] EWCA Civ 434; [2015] WLR (D) 195

‘There was no justification for extending the residual appellate jurisdiction of the Court of Appeal to encompass decisions of the county court which were alleged to breach article 6 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms since appropriate forms of procedure existed by which a suitable remedy could be obtained.’

WLR Daily, 29th April 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Why human rights reform could trip up Michael Gove – The Guardian

Posted May 11th, 2015 in bills, human rights, news, political parties by sally

‘Of all the tasks awaiting the new justice secretary – legal aid, building bridges with judges – scrapping the Human Rights Act is by far the trickiest.’
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The Guardian, 11th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Bank Mellat’s $4bn A1P1 claim gathers pace – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted May 11th, 2015 in banking, damages, human rights, news, proportionality, terrorism by sally

‘Two recent judgments underscoring the potential high cost of the UK getting it wrong in its dealing with businesses and hence being liable to pay damages under the Human Rights Act for breach of its A1P1 obligations. Regular readers will know that A1P1 is the ECHR right to peaceful enjoyment of property.’
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UK Human Rights Blog, 9th May 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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