Courts must “get a handle” on disclosure pilot costs – Litigation Futures

Posted September 10th, 2020 in costs, disclosure, news, pilot schemes, solicitors by sally

‘The Business and Property Courts must “get a handle” on why most solicitors believe the disclosure pilot is not producing cost savings, the professor monitoring its progress has said.’

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Litigation Futures, 9th September 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

BSB pilots reverse race mentoring for senior White barristers – Legal Futures

The Bar Standards Board (BSB) has launched a pilot reverse mentoring scheme, in which Bar students and junior barristers from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds mentor senior White barristers.

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Legal Futures, 3rd September 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Facial Recognition Technology not “In Accordance with Law” – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal, overturning a Divisional Court decision, has found the use of a facial recognition surveillance tool used by South Wales Police to be in breach of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The case was brought by Liberty on behalf of privacy and civil liberties campaigner Ed Bridges. The appeal was upheld on the basis that the interference with Article 8 of the ECHR, which guarantees a right to privacy and family life, was not “in accordance with law” due to an insufficient legal framework. However, the court found that, had it been in accordance with law, the interference caused by the use of facial recognition technology would not have been disproportionate to the goal of preventing crime. The court also found that Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) was deficient, and that the South Wales Police (SWP), who operated the technology, had not fulfilled their Public Sector Equality Duty.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 13th August 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Police’s Automated Facial Recognition Deployments Ruled Unlawful by the Court of Appeal – Doughty Street Chambers

‘R. (Bridges) v Chief Constable of South Wales [2020] EWCA Civ 1058 [2020] 8 WLUK 64 is thought to be the first case in the world to consider the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies. In this short article, we explore the judgment and its implications for the deployment of these and similar technologies in future.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 12th August 2020

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

Let’s face it: use of automated facial recognition technology by the police – UK Police Law Blog

‘The case of R (Bridges) v Chief Constable of South Wales Police & Information Commissioner [2020] EWCA Civ 1058 (handed down on 11 August 2020) was an appeal from what is said to have been the first claim brought before a court anywhere on planet earth concerning the use by police of automated facial recognition (“AFR”) technology. There could be nothing wrong with posting scores of police officers with eidetic memories to look out for up to a 800 wanted persons at public gatherings. So why not use a powerful computer, capable of matching 50 faces a second with a database of (under) 800 suspects, to do this job much more cheaply and instantaneously, flagging any matches to a human operator for final assessment? According to the Court of Appeal in Bridges, this system constitutes an interference with Article 8 rights which is not such as is in accordance with the law, but which (critically) would be proportionate if a sufficiently narrow local policy were framed.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 11th August 2020

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

South Wales police lose landmark facial recognition case – The Guardian

‘Campaigners are calling for South Wales police and other forces to stop using facial recognition technology after the court of appeal ruled that its use breached privacy rights and broke equalities law.’

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The Guardian, 11th August 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Pilot Scheme launched for domestic abuse cases in family courts – Becket Chambers

‘The Domestic Abuse bill which is making its way through the legislative process and which was delayed as a result of the calling of the general election (and the prorogation of Parliament) has reached the report stage in the commons this week. It is expected to be amended to incorporate the reforms to the legislation recommended by an expert panel and which will implement those recommendations and commence a pilot scheme to trial them.’

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Becket Chambers, 1st July 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

Family court judges given power to intervene in domestic abuse cases – The Guardian

‘Judges will be empowered to intervene in cases of domestic abuse to prevent the complainant from being re-victimised by aggressive lines of questioning, as part of a new raft of legal changes announced today.’

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The Guardian, 25th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Challenge to new voter ID pilot dismissed by Court of Appeal – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Government’s announcement that eleven local authorities across England would be taking part in voter ID pilots for the 2019 local elections was controversial. There is a heated debate as to whether citizens should have to provide photo identification before receiving their ballot at elections. For some, it is a straight-forward measure to avoid the risk of fraud. For others, it is a policy that, by design or inadvertently, leads to the disenfranchisement of certain groups.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 9th June 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Disclosure pilot “to be extended for another year” – Litigation Futures

Posted May 21st, 2020 in disclosure, news, pilot schemes by sally

‘The disclosure pilot in the Business and Property Courts is likely to be extended until the end of 2021, it has emerged.’

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Litigation Futures, 19th May 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

New criminal sentencing provisions: Alcohol Abstinence and Monitoring Requirement comes into force on 19 May 2020 – 5SAH

Posted May 19th, 2020 in alcohol abuse, electronic monitoring, news, pilot schemes, sentencing by sally

‘Following the completion of a pilot of the Alcohol Abstinence and Monitoring Requirement (AAMR), section 76 of the Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 will come into force on 19 May 2020 (UKSI no.478 of 2020). Section 76 inserts a new section 212A to the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (“CJA 2003”), which empowers the court to impose an AAMR as a requirement of a community order or suspended sentence order.’

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5SAH, 12th May 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

How court trials are coping with coronavirus – BBC News

Posted May 19th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, criminal justice, juries, news, pilot schemes by sally

‘A pilot scheme has begun to restart jury trials in the UK after they were halted due to the coronavirus pandemic.’

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BBC News, 18th May 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Company must disclose documents held by subsidiaries – Litigation Futures

‘A company must disclose documents held by its subsidiaries and which it controls, the High Court has ruled, in a case handled under the disclosure pilot.’

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Litigation Futures, 6th April 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Disclosure can apply to subsidiaries under pilot, says court – OUT-LAW.com

Posted March 5th, 2020 in disclosure, news, pilot schemes, subsidiary companies by tracey

‘Disclosure of documents held by a subsidiary company of a party to litigation may be ordered in certain circumstances under the terms of the pilot disclosure scheme currently running in the Business and Property Courts (BPC) of England and Wales, a judge has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 5th March 2020

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Parties praised after first trial in capped costs pilot – Litigation Futures

Posted March 4th, 2020 in costs, leases, local government, news, pilot schemes by sally

‘The first case under the capped costs pilot reached trial last week, with the judge commending the parties for their “significant degree of collaboration” to make it work.’

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Litigation Futures, 2nd March 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Extended pilot of fully video hearings made opt-out – Legal Futures

Posted February 21st, 2020 in civil procedure rules, live link evidence, news, pilot schemes, trials by sally

‘A pilot of fully video hearings in the civil courts is to be extended and turned from opt-in to opt-out, the Civil Procedure Rule Committee (CPRC) has decided.’

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Legal Futures, 21st February 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Impact on rape victims of police phone seizures to be reviewed – The Guardian

‘The impact on rape victims of police seizures of their mobile phones is to be examined as the Metropolitan police begin piloting a data inspection system designed to limit invasion of privacy.’

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The Guardian, 16th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Vos issues warning to parties who abuse disclosure pilot – Litigation Futures

Posted February 17th, 2020 in costs, disclosure, documents, news, pilot schemes by sally

‘Parties that try to use the disclosure pilot for litigation advantage will face “serious adverse costs consequences”, the Chancellor of the High Court has warned, urging judges to take action if they see it.’

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Litigation Futures, 17th February 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Commercial Court aims to tackle listing issues – Litigation Futures

‘The Commercial Court has pledged to try and eliminate listing issues that have occurred in the past year amid a reduction in the number of available judges.’

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Litigation Futures, 13th February 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Meadowhall facial recognition scheme troubles watchdog – BBC News

Posted January 28th, 2020 in data protection, facial mapping, identification, news, pilot schemes, police by tracey

‘Police involvement in a private landlord’s facial recognition trial has led a regulator to call for government intervention.’

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BBC News, 28th January 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk