Has coronavirus changed the UK justice system for ever? – The Guardian

‘The pandemic has led to big changes in trials, many of of which are likely to be permanent.’

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The Guardian, 24th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

How court trials are coping with coronavirus – BBC News

Posted May 19th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, criminal justice, juries, news, pilot schemes by sally

‘A pilot scheme has begun to restart jury trials in the UK after they were halted due to the coronavirus pandemic.’

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BBC News, 18th May 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Murder trial resumes with counsel and jury swapping seats – Legal Futures

‘A jury trial resumed at the Old Bailey yesterday, with barristers in the jury and press boxes, and jurors socially distancing in counsel’s rows after being told there were no face masks for them.’

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Legal Futures, 12th May 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Juries and Covid-19: protecting the right to a fair trial – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted May 12th, 2020 in coronavirus, human rights, juries, news by sally

‘With Covid-19 having driven jury-trials to a grinding halt, it is no overstatement to suggest that justice itself has been suspended.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th May 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Jury trials to resume in England and Wales with physical distancing – The Guardian

Posted May 12th, 2020 in coronavirus, Crown Court, juries, news by sally

‘Jury trials will resume under physical distancing restrictions in a limited number of crown courts in England and Wales from 18 May, the lord chief justice has announced.’

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The Guardian, 11th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Old Bailey jury trials to resume this week – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 11th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, criminal justice, Crown Court, juries, news, trials by sally

‘Two jury trials will resume at the Old Bailey this week as first steps toward Crown court cases restarting around the country. However, the criminal bar warned that a resumption of normal service “remains many weeks off”.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 10th May 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

The impact of Coronavirus, part 7: the possible next steps for the jury system – 6KBW College Hill

Posted May 7th, 2020 in coronavirus, criminal justice, juries, news by sally

‘In a series of Blog posts, members of 6KBW have identified a number of ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has led to change in the administration of criminal justice, namely in relation to jury trials as presently conducted, the extension of audio/visual links and virtual hearings, through the offences created by the Coronavirus Act 2020 and in the context of extradition. As the country enters its second 3 week period of lockdown, this post seeks to look ahead to consider the possible next steps that the continued risk of infection by the virus may force on the administration of criminal justice in that most important but least socially detached component of the criminal justice system, the jury.’

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6KBW College Hill, 27th April 2020

Source: blog.6kbw.com

Coronavirus: Courts must resume to deal with ‘backlog of cases’ – BBC News

‘Victims are being left in “distressing limbo” due to a growing backlog of cases during the coronavirus pandemic, a top Cardiff barrister has warned.’

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BBC News, 3rd May 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Coronavirus: Jury trials face ‘biggest change since WW2’ – BBC News

‘Coronavirus could prompt the biggest changes to jury trials since World War Two, the head of judiciary in England and Wales has told the BBC.’

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BBC News, 30th April 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Non-jury trials could help clear coronavirus backlog, says QC – The Guardian

Posted April 27th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, criminal justice, delay, juries, news, trials by sally

‘Defendants should be allowed to opt for trial by judge rather than in front of a jury, a prominent human rights lawyer has proposed, as a means of partially restarting the criminal justice system.’

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The Guardian, 26th April 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Judiciary sets up working party to bring back jury trials – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted April 24th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, health, health & safety, judiciary, juries, news, trials by sally

‘The prospect of jury trials restarting has come closer with news that the judiciary has set up a working party to consider how they can be brought back as soon as it is safe to do so. The news comes shortly after lord chancellor Robert Buckland said he wanted jury trials back up and running as quickly as possible.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 24th April 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

“Justice in the time of Coronavirus”: Considering Diplock Courts and Majority Verdicts in light of COVID-19 – Thomas More Chambers

Posted April 20th, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, courts, juries, news, trials by sally

‘The coronavirus (COVID-19) and the government “lockdown” has bought about interesting times and the Coronavirus Act 20201, in particular ss.53-57 (with Schedules 23-27).’

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Thomas More Chambers, 15th April 2020

Source: www.thomasmore.co.uk

Fully remote jury test a ‘success for open justice’ – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted April 20th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, juries, live link evidence, news, remote hearings, trials by tracey

‘Campaign group Justice has run an experimental fully remote jury trial to test whether it could be a fair alternative to face-to-face hearings during the coronavirus lockdown.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 20th April 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

The impact of Coronavirus, part 1: trial by jury during a pandemic – 6KBW College Hill

‘Covid 19: the current situation is so fast moving that anything written will almost inevitably be out of date by the time it is typed. However, following the effective “lock down” from 8.30pm on 23 March 2020 it may be that there are fewer further changes until restrictions can be eased, and it is useful to reflect on the effect so far.’

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6KBW College Hill, 30th March 2020

Source: blog.6kbw.com

Serious sexual offences involving Medical professionals: Catherine Silverton shares 18 years’ of trial experience – Park Square Barristers

‘Sexual allegations can be distinguished from criminal allegations of other types by virtue of often being prosecuted purely on the basis of one person’s word. There are invariably no witnesses to the interaction between the Complainant and Defendant during which the alleged offence is said to have been committed. There is very rarely any physical or scientific evidence capable of proving or refuting the allegation. No circumstantial evidence. No technological evidence. Sexual allegations are increasingly made weeks, months or even years after the alleged event, by which time delay has frayed memories on all sides which leaves nothing but word against word.’

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Park Square Barristers, 7th April 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

The impact of Coronavirus, part 1: trial by jury during a pandemic – 6KBW College Hill

‘Covid 19: the current situation is so fast moving that anything written will almost inevitably be out of date by the time it is typed. However, following the effective “lock down” from 8.30pm on 23 March 2020 it may be that there are fewer further changes until restrictions can be eased, and it is useful to reflect on the effect so far.’

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6KBW College Hill, 30th March 2020

Source: blog.6kbw.com

Is Covid-19 Changing How We Think About Criminal Justice Reform? – Each Other

‘Barrister Tim Kiely examines the unexpected changes taking place within the criminal justice system amid the Covid-19 outbreak.’

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Each Other, 26th March 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Jurors packed into crowded courts: how the government defied coronavirus advice – The Guardian

Posted March 24th, 2020 in coronavirus, courts, health, health & safety, juries, news, trials by sally

‘Trials may now be suspended in England, but forcing people to mix in cramped rooms during a coronavirus crisis was risky at best.’

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The Guardian, 23rd March 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Government identifies justice system’s keyworkers – Legal Futures

‘Legal professionals involved in court and tribunal hearings, as well as those advising people deprived of their liberty or on executing wills are ‘keyworkers’, the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has said.’

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Legal Futures, 23rd March 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Inquest jury concludes multiple failures at HMP Nottingham contributed to self-inflicted death of Ben Ireson – Garden Court Chambers

Posted March 23rd, 2020 in death in custody, inquests, juries, news, prisons, standards, suicide by sally

‘Benjamin Ireson, known as Ben, was a much-loved son, brother, uncle and friend to many. He was found hanged in his cell at HMP Nottingham on 13 December 2018. He was 31 years old.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 9th March 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk