MPs given early chance to scrutinise discount rate reform legislation – Litigation Futures

‘The justice select committee has accepted an invitation by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to undertake pre-legislative scrutiny of the draft legislation to reform the discount rate.’

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Litigation Futures, 18th September 2017

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

‘They funked it’ – LCJ’s dismay at inaction on older recorders – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted September 18th, 2017 in judges, judiciary, Ministry of Justice, news, recruitment, retirement, select committees by tracey

‘The lord chief justice has urged the government to deal with the thorny issue of forcing retirement upon part-time recorders believed to be clogging up the judicial system.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 18th September 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

House of Lords launches inquiry into post-Brexit competition policy – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 26th, 2017 in competition, EC law, inquiries, news, select committees by sally

‘The House of Lords’ EU Internal Market Sub-Committee has launched an inquiry into the implications of Brexit on UK competition policy.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 25th July 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Online trolling laws under consideration following abuse of MPs – The Independent

‘An investigation into the abuse of MPs and parliamentary candidates is considering whether new laws are needed to protect public servants because of the rise of social media.’

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The Independent, 24th July 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Jack Simson Caird: The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill: Constitutional Change and Legal Continuity – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Nine months after Theresa May first announced that there would be a ‘Great Repeal Bill’, and three and a half months after triggering Article 50, the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill (EUW Bill) was published on 13 July 2017. The Bill is a complex mixture of constitutional change and legal continuity. This post highlights some of its main elements.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th July 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

PM orders inquiry into intimidation of MPs during general election – The Guardian

‘Theresa May has ordered an investigation into intimidation experienced by candidates during the last election after a barrage of complaints by MPs about death threats and harassment.’

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The Guardian, 12th July 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Munira Ali: Examining the dissolution of the Joint Committee on Human Rights’ inquiry into mental health and deaths in prisons: another missed opportunity? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The issues relating to imprisonment of individuals with mental health problems in the UK has attracted considerable attention, as the number of self-inflicted deaths has risen to the highest number since records began in 1978. With a rate of one prison suicide every three days, the director of the Howard League described the current rate as having reached “epidemic proportions”. The steady rise of deaths in custody has prompted a series of inquiries in recent years, and has drawn scrutiny from UN bodies and Special Procedures, and more recently, UN Member States as part of a periodic review of its human rights performance. However, despite this, little progress has been made.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th June 2017

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Employees, Directors & the Futures Path of Corporate Governance Reform – Littleton Chambers

‘Shortly before the calling of a General Election the Business and Enterprise Select Committee of the House of Commons published a report on corporate governance. As the report’s reception and subsequent comment have made clear, whatever the outcome of the election the framework set by the report is likely to determine the direction of future corporate governance reform.’

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Littleton Chambers, 9th May 2017

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

Social media giants ‘shamefully far’ from tackling illegal content – BBC News

Posted May 2nd, 2017 in child abuse, internet, news, pornography, reports, select committees, terrorism by sally

‘Social media firms are “shamefully far” from tackling illegal and dangerous content, says a parliamentary report.’

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BBC News, 1st May 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Orgreave files: Government urged to consider release – BBC News

Posted April 27th, 2017 in disclosure, documents, industrial action, miners, news, police, select committees by sally

‘Secret files concerning one of the most high profile clashes of the 1980s miners’ strike should be assessed and made public if possible, a government committee has said.’

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BBC News, 27th April 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Plan to opt out of rights accords in future wars dangerous, inquiry hears – The Guardian

‘Government plans to opt out of international human rights agreements in future conflicts would be dangerous and prevent British soldiers from obtaining justice, according to evidence submitted to a parliamentary inquiry by the Law Society and Liberty.’

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The Guardian, 24th April 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Employment tribunal fees ‘barrier’ to justice in human rights cases, say MPs – Legal Voice

Posted April 12th, 2017 in employment tribunals, fees, human rights, news, select committees by sally

‘Employment tribunal fees were ‘a barrier to victims seeking justice when they have suffered human rights abuses’, according to an influential group of MPs. The House of Commons’ joint committee on human rights have added their collective voice to the justice and equalities committees in calling on the Government to cut the charges introduced in 2013.’

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Legal Voice, 11th April 2017

Source: www.legalvoice.org.uk

Tribunal fees ‘barrier to justice’, rights committee says – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Employment tribunal fees create impunity to bosses abusing human rights, parliamentarians have said, accusing the Ministry of Justice of complacency on some of the barriers faced by people seeking access to justice.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 6th April 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Truss’s plan to increase probate fees may not be legally enforceable – The Guardian

Posted April 6th, 2017 in enforcement, fees, news, probate, reports, select committees by tracey

‘Government plans to raise £300m by increasing probate fees – payable when claiming inheritances – may not be legally enforceable, a parliamentary committee has said. A report by the joint committee on statutory instruments has suggested that the Ministry of Justice may not have the authority to introduce the charges of up to £20,000 per estate.’

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The Guardian, 6th April 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Licensing Act review committee calls for ‘radical comprehensive overhaul’ – OUT-LAW.com

‘Licensing laws in England and Wales should be changed to give local planning authorities responsibility for determining the rights of businesses to sell alcohol on their premises, according to a House of Lords committee.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th April 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

UK should follow minimum alcohol price, say Lords – BBC News

Posted April 4th, 2017 in alcohol abuse, alcoholism, licensing, news, reports, Scotland, select committees by sally

‘Minimum unit pricing for alcohol should be rolled out across the UK if Scotland’s scheme is successful, a Lords committee says.’

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BBC News, 4th April 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Allow judiciary to work until 75, says Britain’s most senior judge – The Guardian

Posted March 30th, 2017 in age discrimination, elderly, judges, judiciary, news, retirement, select committees by tracey

‘Judges should be allowed to sit beyond the age of 70 to ease the growing problem of judicial recruitment, the UK’s most senior judge, Lord Neuberger, has said.’

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The Guardian, 29th March 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Christina Lienen: Why the Implications of ‘No Deal’ Are No Mere ‘Exercise in Guesswork’ – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Theresa May is to trigger Article 50 on 29 March 2017, kicking off the two-year negotiation period during which the relationship between the UK and the EU will be redefined. On 12 March the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee published their ninth report of the current session: ‘Article 50 negotiations: Implications of ‘no deal’’. This is the first Select Committee publication focusing specifically on the implications faced by the UK in the event of a ‘no deal’ situation, with reference to a range of different sectors, policy areas and circumstances. Last week the concerns raised in the report as to the Government’s position or rather the apparent lack thereof regarding ‘no deal’ implications seemed to be confirmed when the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union made headlines telling the Brexit Select Committee that the Government had done no economic assessment of the possible effects of a “no deal” scenario. On 24 January 2017, similar remarks were made when Davis said that there were so many different things to assess, considering implications of ‘no deal’ would be ‘nothing more than an exercise in guesswork at this stage’. In this post I will highlight the most interesting points raised in the report which go to show that, contrary to what the Government suggests, it is actually both possible and vital to assess what areas require particular attention and what challenges this would bring. Beyond the question of ‘no deal’ implications, there are various aspects that the report touches upon which would benefit from academic discussion.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 24th March 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

Alexander Horne: Select Committee Powers of Enforcement – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On 7 March 2017, the House of Commons Committee of Privileges announced a new inquiry into the exercise and enforcement of the powers of the House in relation to select committees and contempts of Parliament.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 23rd March 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

Lord chief justice attacks Liz Truss for failing to back article 50 judges – The Guardian

‘The lord chief justice, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, has launched a forthright attack on the justice secretary, Liz Truss, for her failure last year to defend judges who were branded “enemies of the people”.’

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The Guardian, 22nd March 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk