Home Office to face legal challenge over ‘digital hostile environment’ – The Guardian

‘Immigrants’ rights campaigners are to bring the first court case of its kind in British legal history in an attempt to turn off what they claim is a decision-making algorithm that creates a “hostile environment” for people applying for UK visas online.’

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The Guardian, 18th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Yossi Nehushtan: The 14-Day Quarantine Policy is Illegal – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Harsh criticism, mainly from politicians and the travel industry has been expressed regarding the new government policy, according to which, and from 8 June, nearly all international arrivals at UK ports must quarantine for 14 days. It is surprising that very little has been said about the clear illegality of this policy, despite a very recent judicial review process that has been brought against the policy by a few airline companies. In this post it is argued that the quarantine policy is irrational, unreasonable and disproportionate – and therefore illegal. A preliminary note about the differences between rationality and reasonableness will be followed by applying rationality, reasonableness and proportionality to our case.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 17th June 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Racism contributed to disproportionate UK BAME coronavirus deaths, inquiry finds – The Guardian

‘Racism and discrimination suffered by Britain’s black, Asian and minority ethnic people has contributed to the high death rates from Covid-19 in those communities, an official inquiry has found.’

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The Guardian, 14th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

BA, easyJet and Ryanair begin court action over UK quarantine rules – The Guardian

‘Britain’s three biggest airlines have filed papers in the high court to seek an urgent judicial review of the government’s quarantine laws, which they say are having a devastating effect on tourism and the wider economy.’

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The Guardian, 12th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Matt Hancock faces legal action from daughter of Covid-19 care home victim – The Guardian

‘Matt Hancock is facing legal action from the daughter of a man who died from Covid-19 in a care home in which the health secretary is accused of a “litany of failures” and misleading the public with his claim to have “thrown a protective ring” around care homes.’

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The Guardian, 12th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Does the Buck Stop? Legal Liability for Death from Covid-19 – Garden Court Chambers

‘“If the government were an employee of mine I would have sacked them for gross negligence” – so said Anita Astley, manager of Wren Hall nursing home in Nottinghamshire, where 10 residents died from Covid-19 and 48 carers caught the virus in a three week period[1]. Ms Astley’s complaint poses in stark terms a question which has been circulating since the full and devastating extent of the consequences of the pandemic have become clear: what, if any, legal liability does the state have for deaths caused by Covid-19?’

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Garden Court Chambers, 9th June 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Equalities watchdog to investigate hostile environment policy – The Guardian

‘The Home Office is being investigated over whether it breached equality law when it introduced the “hostile environment” immigration measures that caused catastrophic consequences for thousands of Windrush generation residents living legally in the UK.’

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The Guardian, 12th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Shamima Begum’s UK citizenship should be restored, court told – The Guardian

Posted June 12th, 2020 in appeals, citizenship, government departments, immigration, news, terrorism by sally

‘Shamima Begum, the woman who left Britain as a schoolgirl to join Islamic State, cannot effectively challenge the government’s decision to deprive her of British citizenship while she is in a detention camp in northern Syria, the court of appeal has been told.’

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The Guardian, 11th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Whitehall held secret review into 15 possible cases of torture or rendition – The Guardian

‘Fifteen potential cases of torture or rendition involving British intelligence at the height of the “war on terror” were examined last year in a secret Whitehall review, whose existence was revealed in court proceedings on Tuesday.’

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The Guardian, 9th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Tenant eviction ban in England and Wales extended by two months – The Guardian

‘The government has extended its ban on evictions in England and Wales by a further two months, prolonging the breathing space for thousands of tenants who have struggled to pay the rent during lockdown.’

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The Guardian, 6th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

UK airlines launch legal battle over Covid-19 quarantine ruling – The Guardian

‘Britain’s three biggest airlines have started legal proceedings against the government in a bid to overturn quarantine rules due to take effect in the UK from Monday.’

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The Guardian, 7th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Government facing legal action over policies on care homes during COVID-19 crisis – Local Government Lawyer

Posted June 5th, 2020 in bereavement, coronavirus, government departments, health & safety, news by sally

‘A daughter whose father died of suspected COVID-19 in a care home is to launch a legal action “to hold the government to account”.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 4th June 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Coronavirus: Court action threatened over school meal vouchers – BBC News

‘Campaigners have threatened to bring legal action against the government for not providing free school meal vouchers during the summer.’

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BBC News, 5th June 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Implications for expulsions following the Supreme Court ruling of AM (Zimbabwe) – Garden Court Chambers

‘Cases where applicants seek to resist removal from the UK because of adverse health consequences have given rise to both great passions and difficult points of principle. The decision of the Supreme Court in AM (Zimbabwe) [2020] UKSC 17 gave the opportunity for the UK’s approach to catch up with that taken by the ECtHR in recent years. In this post we look at the implications of the judgment both generally and in relation to two specific scenarios, namely destitution and “fitness to fly”.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 19th May 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Righting wrongs: interview with Martin Forde QC – Counsel

‘One year on from the launch of the Windrush compensation scheme, the silk who oversaw its design talks to Natasha Shotunde about the scandal, British attitudes to migration and citizenship, and misconceptions holding applicants back from rightful compensation.’

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Counsel, June 2020

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

Windrush scandal: only 60 victims given compensation so far – The Guardian

‘Only 60 people have received Windrush compensation payments during the first year of the scheme’s operation, with just £360,000 distributed from a fund officials expected might be required to pay out between £200m and £500m.’

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The Guardian, 28th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Privacy group prepares legal challenge to NHS test-and-trace scheme – The Guardian

‘Privacy campaigners are preparing a legal challenge to the NHS’s coronavirus test-and-trace programme as concerns grow about the amount of contact data that will be collected and retained by government.’

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The Guardian, 31st May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Attorney general faces calls to resign after she defends Dominic Cummings – The Guardian

‘The attorney general, Suella Braverman, is facing calls to resign after she joined the chorus of Downing Street loyalists defending Dominic Cummings’s trip to Durham during lockdown.’

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The Guardian, 25th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

EP 112: Government’s reliance on AI in times of plague – Robert Spano – Law Pod UK

‘Robert Spano, who recently commenced his tenure as President of the European Court of Human Rights in the difficult circumstances of lockdown and remote working, discusses with Rosalind English the challenges we face with government’s reliance on automated decision making. This is a question rendered particularly sharp with the pandemic and the conditions under which the restrictions will be lifted.’

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Law Pod UK, 22nd May 2020

Source: audioboom.com

Court rules bar set too high for NHS surcharge and visa fee waivers – The Guardian

‘A court ruling has given hope to thousands of migrants, including health and care workers, that they will no longer have to pay visa and NHS surcharge fees if they cannot afford them.’

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The Guardian, 21st May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com