High Court dismisses legal challenge to local government reorganisation in Dorset – Local Government Lawyer

Posted August 7th, 2018 in boundaries, judicial review, local government, news by sally

‘A High Court judge has rejected a legal challenge brought by Christchurch Borough Council over local government reorganisation in Dorset.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 7th August 2018

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Are you being served (electronically)? Email service under the CPR and the Party Wall Act 1996 – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted March 15th, 2018 in boundaries, civil procedure rules, electronic mail, news, service, surveyors by tracey

‘Two recent cases, one in the Court of Appeal, the other in the Supreme Court, have created significant uncertainty around the acceptability of email service. It seems that there may now be a disparity between the CPR and the Party Wall Act 1996, despite the similarities in the wording of the relevant provisions for the two regimes.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 14th March 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Autumn Newsletter – Falcon Chambers

– Prescriptive easements – a glass half-full: out with the negative; in with the positive 10

– Keeping the Title Clean: Unwanted Notices and Restrictions 12

– Estoppel in Pre-Contractual Negotiations 15

– The Curse of the Freebie 17

– Voidable and no Mistake 20

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Falcon Chambers, November 2017

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Ministers urged to ditch plans to cut number of MPs by 50 – The Guardian

Posted October 17th, 2017 in boundaries, constitutional reform, consultations, elections, news, parliament by tracey

‘Government does not have parliamentary support for revised boundary changes, which would boost Tory election win chances, say Labour and Lib Dems.’

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The Guardian, 17th October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Where to draw the line? – Tanfield Chambers

Posted August 22nd, 2017 in boundaries, evidence, news by sally

‘Boundary disputes are among the most expensive and acrimonious litigation. It is rare to find an area of law in which a “point of principle” so often leads to such disregard of otherwise compelling considerations such as time, energy and cost. Kerry Bretherton QC of Tanfield Chambers provides a summary of some of the main legal principles applicable in boundary disputes that RICS professionals should be aware of.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 9th August 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

‘Handbags in the cul-de-sac’: Judge accuses neighbours of ‘acting like immature teenagers’ in boundary row – Daily Telegraph

‘A judge accused warring neighbours of having “handbags in the cul-de-sac” after an 81-year-old man attacked a man living next door with a rounders bat.’

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Daily Telegraph, 26th March 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Reeves v Young – Tanfield Chambers

Posted February 16th, 2017 in boundaries, costs, enforcement, estoppel, news, surveyors by sally

‘Third surveyors, the impartial arbiters of the party wall world, rarely feature prominently in party wall litigation. However, there have been two recent County Court cases in which the selection and purported removal of third surveyors has been considered by the Court, in both cases HHJ Bailey in the County Court at Central London.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 2nd February 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Time to party (over that wall) like it’s 1996 – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted December 1st, 2016 in boundaries, enforcement, news by sally

‘As the incredible rise of our transatlantic wall-building friend sets gently into the twilight of credulity, it provides us with an opportunity to get back to reality with the Party Wall etc. Act 1996 (PWA 1996).’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 1st December 2016

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

How are the boundary changes going to affect you? – The Independent

Posted September 13th, 2016 in boundaries, elections, news, parliament by sally

‘You may wonder what it has to do with you if two or three electoral wards move from one constituency to another at the other end of the country.’

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The Independent, 13th September 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Pensioner faces jail if he walks on police couple’s grass in a bitter eight-year turf war – Daily Telegraph

Posted August 31st, 2016 in boundaries, disqualification, elderly, news, restraint orders by sally

‘A pensioner who battled with his neighbours over a patch of land could be sent to jail if he walks on the grass outside his home.’

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Daily Telegraph, 31st August 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

A judge by any other name would smell… much the same – Hardwicke Chambers

‘Did you know that a judge of the First-tier Tribunal (Property Chamber) may be able to hear a county court case and vice versa? Under a scheme being piloted at present, such a thing is indeed possible.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 13th June 2016

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

It has a “T” mark so I own the boundary – Park Square Barristers

Posted June 2nd, 2016 in boundaries, conveyancing, land registration, news by sally

‘As most properties now have registered titles, the starting is to look to the Register for the boundary. However – this is subject to two obvious pitfalls:

1. The boundary is a “general boundary” unless it has been fixed (and few boundaries are fixed);
2. The start point was, is and will remain, the conveyance that divided the plot out – ie the first division from a larger piece. This may have been many years before – often over 100 years before.’

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Park Square Barristers, 25th May 2016

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Location, Location, Registration – Tanfield Chambers

Posted April 26th, 2016 in boundaries, land registration, news, tribunals by sally

‘Two recent cases of the Upper Tribunal indicate clear differences in judicial opinion as to the jurisdiction of the Land Registration Division of the First Tier Tribunal (1) to make general findings as to the location of boundaries of registered titles and (2) to direct the Registrar to make entries in the Register reflecting those findings when those findings do not reflect an application that has been made for registration of a determined boundary.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 21st April 2016

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

When is a boundary dispute not a boundary dispute? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted February 23rd, 2016 in boundaries, land registration, news, tribunals by sally

‘For litigants and property practitioners alike the FFT Property Chamber Land Registration has a number of advantages; not least no tribunal fees and a free mediation service. However the recent case of Murdoch & or v Amesbury & or [2016] UKUT 3 (TCC) is a timely reminder that the tribunal is not simply an alternative for the county court.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 11th February 2016

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

R (Luton Borough Council) v Central Bedfordshire Council and others – WLR Daily

R (Luton Borough Council) v Central Bedfordshire Council and others [2015] EWCA Civ 537; [2015] WLR (D) 226

‘Paragraph 83 of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF”) ((27 March 2012) did not lay down a presumption or create a requirement that the boundaries of the Green Belt had to first be altered via the process for changing a local plan before development might take place on the area in question. Paragraphs 87–88 of the NPPF plainly contemplated that development might be permitted on land within the Green Belt, without the need to change its boundaries in the local plan, provided “very special circumstances” existed.’

WLR Daily, 20th May 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Brantley and others v Constituency Boundaries Commission and others – WLR Daily

Posted May 21st, 2015 in boundaries, constitutional law, elections, law reports, Privy Council by sally

Brantley and others v Constituency Boundaries Commission and others [2015] UKPC 21; [2015] WLR (D) 209

‘A proclamation signed by the Governor General authorising alteration of the constituency boundaries in the territories of St Christopher and Nevis was made, under section 119 of the Constitution, when it was published in the Official Gazette; and it came into force, pursuant to section 50(6) of the Constitution, on the next dissolution of Parliament after it was made. Therefore, where the Governor General had dissolved Parliament with effect from 16 January 2015 and fixed the election date for 16 February 2015, and, by proclamation published in the Official Gazette on 20 January, authorised alteration of the constituency boundaries, the proclamation, having been made after the dissolution of Parliament, if valid only came into force on the dissolution of the Parliament elected in February 2015 and did not govern the 2015 election.’

WLR Daily, 11th May 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Call for MP boundary review law change – BBC News

Posted March 16th, 2015 in boundaries, elections, news, parliament by sally

‘Rules that pave the way for the number of MPs to be reduced from 650 to 600 must be reversed, a parliamentary group has said.’

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BBC News, 15th March 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Court of Appeal: litigants in person may get help with relief from sanctions, but only “at the margins” – Litigation Futures

‘The fact that an individual or a company is a litigant in person is not a reason for the “disapplication” of court orders, rules and directions, appeal judges have ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 5th January 2015

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Boundaries And The Interpretation Of Conveyances: Myths And Legends – No. 5 Chambers

Posted December 3rd, 2014 in boundaries, conveyancing, dispute resolution, evidence, interpretation, news by sally

‘The aim of this seminar is to examine a number of commonly held misconceptions about boundary interpretation – “the myths” – and to look at one or two legends along the way.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 28th November 2014

Source: www.no5.com

Boundary disputes: Evidence – The pitfalls and practicalities – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted May 12th, 2014 in appeals, boundaries, costs, evidence, news, trespass by sally

‘Boundary disputes are rarely cost effective and the courts often make orders that make them disproportionately costly for the winner as well as the loser. Two recent cases demonstrate that risk and the importance of fully exploring and considering the available and/or potential evidence as early as possible.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 7th May 2014

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk