Sir Mark Hedley: The judge who opened the doors to Britain’s most secretive court – The Independent

“Sir Mark Hedley decided that the public should know about the judiciary’s highly sensitive rulings. He tells Emily Dugan why.”

Full story

The Independent, 16th June 2013

Source: www.independent.co.uk

In re ITN News and others – WLR Daily

Posted May 23rd, 2013 in appeals, jurisdiction, law reports, media, reporting restrictions, witnesses by sally

In re ITN News and others [2013] EWCA Crim 773; [2013] WLR (D) 187

“The Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) had jurisdiction under section 159 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 to entertain an appeal against an order under section 46 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 prohibiting the reporting of any matter relating to a witness, even where the court was not otherwise concerned with any proceedings between the defendant at trial and the Crown or any issue arising from it.”

WLR Daily, 21st May 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Regina (A) v Lowestoft Magistrates’ Court – WLR Daily

Posted May 16th, 2013 in children, law reports, local government, reporting restrictions by sally

Regina (A) v Lowestoft Magistrates’ Court [2013] EWHC 659 (Admin); [2013] WLR (D) 177

“The child specifically referred to in any charge under section 2(1) of the Licensing Act 1902 was a subject of criminal proceedings which were taken ‘in respect of’, and thus “concerned”, that child for the purposes of the court’s power to impose reporting restrictions under section 39 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933.”

WLR Daily, 26th March 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Saudi princes fail to win sovereign immunity in UK court case – The Guardian

Posted May 16th, 2013 in appeals, immunity, news, reporting restrictions, royal family by sally

“Two senior Saudi princes have failed to extract themselves from English justice after the court of appeal upheld a ruling that they are not entitled to sovereign immunity in a case involving their London-based business interests.”

Full story

The Guardian, 16th May 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Will police stop naming suspects? – BBC News

Posted May 3rd, 2013 in anonymity, news, police, reporting restrictions, sexual offences by tracey

“Should we, the public, know who the police have arrested? Do people deserve
anonymity until the point that the police charge them with an offence – or in
the case of some crimes – anonymity until convicted?”

Full story

BBC News, 3rd May 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Plans to keep names of suspects secret being considered – Daily Telegraph

Posted April 9th, 2013 in anonymity, media, news, police, reporting restrictions by sally

“The identities of suspects who have been arrested could be kept secret from the public, under new plans being drawn up.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 7th April 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

The Daily Telegraph have recently introduced a limited paywall. Users will be permitted to view 20 Daily Telegraph articles per month for free, after which they will need to pay a subscription fee to access content.

Absolutely Transparent – Pink Tape

Posted April 2nd, 2013 in adoption, costs, family courts, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

“Transparency in family justice is an issue that cannot be swept under the carpet.”

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Pink Tape, 29th March 2013

Source: www.pinktape.co.uk

The Court of Protection is subject to unprecedented scrutiny. But there’s still a long way to go – The Independent

“The Independent’s campaign to gain access to the court that deals with Britain’s most vulnerable has made great strides for open justice. Our reporter explains how.”

Full story

The Independent, 12th December 2012

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Cambridge Crown Court rapist anonymity order overturned – BBC News

Posted November 22nd, 2012 in anonymity, appeals, media, news, rape, reporting restrictions by tracey

“The Court of Appeal has overturned an order made by a Cambridge judge who said a convicted rapist could not be identified by the media.”

Full story

BBC News, 22nd November 2012

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Court lifts ban on naming Jeremy Forrest in child abduction case – The Guardian

Posted October 19th, 2012 in anonymity, kidnapping, news, reporting restrictions, teachers by sally

“It is now possible to report that school teacher Jeremy Forrest appeared in court on child abduction charges, after a magistrate court relaxed an unusual court order that had prevented the defendant from being named.”

Full story

The Guardian, 18th October 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Judge imposes reporting restrictions in Dale Cregan case – The Guardian

Posted September 25th, 2012 in bias, contempt of court, media, murder, news, police, public interest, reporting restrictions by sally

“Court makes order postponing reports under section 4(2) of the Contempt of Court Act 1981 due to ‘very real risk of prejudice’.”

Full story

The Guardian, 24th September 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Rochdale paedophile ringleader is named – The Guardian

Posted June 22nd, 2012 in child abuse, news, rape, reporting restrictions, sexual grooming by tracey

“The ringleader of a gang of men in Rochdale who groomed young white girls for sex has been named after he was found guilty of 30 separate child rape charges. Shabir Ahmed, 59, led a child sex exploitation ring of nine men who targeted vulnerable young girls in the Rochdale and Oldham areas of Greater Manchester.”

Full story

The Guardian, 21st June 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Spectator to pay out £5,625 over Rod Liddle’s Stephen Lawrence article – The Guardian

Posted June 7th, 2012 in compensation, fines, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

“The Spectator has been ordered to pay £5,625 in fines and compensation for breaching reporting restrictions over a Rod Liddle comment piece published during the trial of Stephen Lawrence’s killers.”

Full story

The Guardian, 7th June 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Justice system criticised as Spectator faces £5,000 fine over article that jeopardised Stephen Lawrence trial – The Independent

Posted May 10th, 2012 in contempt of court, fines, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

“The father of Stephen Lawrence renewed his criticisms of the criminal justice system today after it emerged that the Spectator magazine faces a maximum £5,000 fine over an article written by Rod Liddle that jeopardised the trial of two of the black teenager’s racist killers.”

Full story

The Independent, 9th May 2012

Source: www.independent.co.uk

On camera – what impact will televised court proceedings have on justice? – Legal Week

Posted April 20th, 2012 in courts, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

“Television cameras were yesterday allowed to record the sentencing of David Gilroy in the High Court in Edinburgh. This is the first time that sentencing in a UK court has been filmed for broadcast the same day – normally proceedings in Scotland are only occasionally filmed for documentaries to be broadcast weeks or months later and are heavily edited by lawyers involved in the case. Filming in most English courts has been banned since 1925.”

Full story

Legal Week, 19th April 2012

Source: www.legalweek.com

Broadcasters lobby party leaders to overturn ban on cameras in court – The Guardian

Posted February 7th, 2012 in courts, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

“The BBC, ITN and Sky have joined forces in an unprecedented letter to David Cameron and the other main party leaders calling for the ban on cameras in courtrooms to be lifted.”

Full story

The Guardian, 6th February 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Judge bans tweeting from Harry Redknapp tax trial after reporter tweets name of juror – Legal Week

Posted January 25th, 2012 in internet, juries, news, reporting restrictions, tax evasion, trials by sally

“The judge in Tottenham Hotspur manager Harry Redknapp’s tax trial has banned the use of Twitter in court after a breach of reporting restrictions.”

Full story

Legal Week, 24th January 2012

Source: www.legalweek.com

Tweet smell of success – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted December 16th, 2011 in internet, media, news, reporting restrictions by tracey

“At last the courts move into the 21st century! Yesterday, the Lord Chief Justice (LCJ) announced that tweeting from court could be carried out by journalists and legal commentators without them seeking advanced permission. Otherwise judges will decide who can and can’t tweet from a courtroom.”

Full story

Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 15th December 2011

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

Judges will decide who can tweet from court – The Guardian

Posted December 14th, 2011 in contempt of court, electronic mail, internet, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

“Despite uncertainty over who’s a legal commentator or journalist and who isn’t, Lord Judge’s guidance shouldn’t lead to problems.”

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The Guardian, 14th December 2011

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Judge tells court reporters: ‘Twitter as much as you wish’ – The Guardian

Posted December 14th, 2011 in contempt of court, internet, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

“Journalists no longer have to make an application to tweet, text or email from courts in England and Wales following new guidance issued by the lord chief justice, Lord Judge.”

Full story

The Guardian, 14th December 2011

Source: www.guardian.co.uk