Nick Barber: The Legal Academic In the Internet Age – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 15th, 2017 in internet, legal education, news, publishing, universities by sally

‘I was contemplating my lectures for the coming academic year and I started to feel annoyed – I think the two were connected. Lecturing has started to seem a rather odd and inefficient way of communicating information about constitutional law to students. Though lectures can be fun to deliver, they are also a pain. For the lecturer, they consume a significant amount of time and energy, raising a sense of déjà vu, as last year’s insights and jokes are dusted off for a new audience. But things are worse for those who have to listen to the thing: dragged into a lecture that can last for an hour or more, a moment’s lack of concentration can mean important points are missed – and few in the audience will only suffer a moment’s inattention. It is becoming obvious that the opportunities presented by the Internet will change this over the coming few years; I would bet that the old-style lecture will only last little while longer (though there are strong forces of creaking institutional inertia protecting it). Putting to one side next year’s teaching, I began to speculate on the ways in which the Internet might change the ways in which we, as legal scholars, communicate our subject to students and to people more generally in the medium term. In this post, I will reflect on how I see legal academia developing over the next five or so years – I think we are on the cusp of a very exciting and largely positive shift in the way in which we operate.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th June 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

‘Sensitive’ UK terror funding inquiry may never be published – The Guardian

Posted June 1st, 2017 in inquiries, news, publishing, reports, terrorism by sally

‘An investigation into the foreign funding and support of jihadi groups that was authorised by David Cameron may never be published, the Home Office has admitted.’

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The Guardian, 31st May 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Publishers call for rethink of proposed changes to online privacy laws – The Guardian

Posted May 30th, 2017 in advertising, internet, news, privacy, publishing by sally

‘An alliance of news publishers has called on European regulators to rethink proposed changes to online privacy laws, arguing that they will potentially kill their digital businesses and give Google, Apple and Facebook too much control of advertising and personal data.’

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The Guardian, 29th May 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Government fails to block release of Andrew Lansley diary portions – The Guardian

‘Court rules in favour of journalist Simon Lewis who made FoI request to see diary passages from period of health reforms.’

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The Guardian, 24th May 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Government rules out appealing air quality plan ruling – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Government has confirmed that it will not appeal last week’s High Court judgment which ordered it to produce its air quality plans by 9 May, it has been reported.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 3rd May 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

WhatsApp must be accessible to authorities, says Amber Rudd – The Guardian

‘Amber Rudd has called for the police and intelligence agencies to be given access to WhatsApp and other encrypted messaging services to thwart future terror attacks, prompting opposition politicians and civil liberties groups to say her demand was unrealistic and disproportionate.’

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The Guardian, 26th March 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Recent ruling a reminder that journalistic defence can defeat data protection breach claims, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

‘ A ruling by the High Court in London last month highlights the special rules that publishers can rely on under UK data protection law to defeat claims that they have processed personal data unlawfully.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th March 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Section 32 DPA: Resistance not Futile – Panopticon

‘We have banged the drum on Panopticon to almost Phil Collins-like levels on theme of the growing utility of the Data Protection Act to media lawyers, but it would be foolish to pretend it can always produce an answer from nowhere in a traditional journalism context. The judgment in ZXC v Bloomberg LP [2017] EWHC 328 (QB) reminds us of that.’

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Panopticon, 6th March 2017

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Costs judge says no: paparazzi lose bid to recover additional liabilities from TV star Walliams – Litigation Futures

Posted February 6th, 2017 in costs, harassment, judges, news, photography, publishing by sally

‘A picture agency which sent photographers to David Walliams’ house when news of his divorce broke is not a news publisher and so cannot recover additional liabilities following the settlement of an action brought by the entertainer, the Senior Costs Judge has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 3rd February 2017

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Publishing prices: SRA to start with divorce, wills, conveyancing and simple SME work – Legal Futures

‘The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is planning to require law firms to publish their fees for services such as divorce, wills or conveyancing, it has emerged.’

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Legal Futures, 26th January 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

High court refuses to publish Ben Butler judgment from 2014 – The Guardian

‘A high court judge has refused to publish a 2014 judgment on the death of Ellie Butler on the grounds that her father, who has been jailed for life for her murder, might in the future face a retrial.’

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The Guardian, 22nd June 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Would-be IS bride jailed at Sheffield Crown Court for terror tweets – BBC News

Posted May 19th, 2016 in internet, news, publishing, sentencing, terrorism by sally

‘A woman who said she wanted to marry “Jihadi John” has been jailed for four years and six months for sharing so-called Islamic State propaganda.’

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BBC News, 18th May 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Chilcot report on Iraq war to be published on 6 July – The Guardian

Posted May 10th, 2016 in delay, inquiries, Iraq, news, publishing, reports, war by sally

‘The long-awaited Chilcot inquiry into the invasion of Iraq is to be published on Wednesday 6 July, two weeks after the EU referendum.’

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The Guardian, 9th May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

This celebrity injunction will probably rebound – a case of the ‘Streisand effect’ – The Guardian

Posted April 12th, 2016 in freedom of expression, injunctions, internet, media, news, privacy, publishing by sally

‘As a Scottish newspaper publishes details of a sex scandal, when does a legal fight to ensure privacy become a pointless exercise to restrict free speech?’

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The Guardian, 11th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Chilcot report on Iraq war to be published next June or July – The Guardian

Posted October 29th, 2015 in delay, inquiries, Iraq, news, publishing, reports, war by sally

‘Sir John Chilcot has announced that he is to publish his report into the Iraq war next June or July following intense pressure from David Cameron to speed up his timetable.’

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The Guardian, 29th October 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Release ‘critical’ reports into privately run immigration centres, ICO orders – The Guardian

Posted June 16th, 2015 in disclosure, freedom of information, immigration, news, publishing, reports by sally

‘Potentially damaging reports into the running of two immigration detention centres by private contractors must be released by the Home Office within weeks, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has said.’

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The Guardian, 15th June 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Je suis James: Pianist finally allowed to tell his story of sexual abuse – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted May 26th, 2015 in appeals, child abuse, children, injunctions, news, publishing, Supreme Court by sally

‘The case considered whether Mr Rhodes could be prevented from publishing his memoir on the basis that to do so would constitute the tort of intentionally causing harm. Those acting on behalf of Mr Rhodes’ son were particularly concerned about the effect upon him of learning of details of his father’s sexual abuse as a child.’
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UK Human Rights Blog, 22nd May 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Pianist James Rhodes can publish child abuse memoir – BBC News

‘A concert pianist has won a legal battle to publish an autobiographical book giving details of sexual abuse he experienced as a child.’

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BBC News, 20th May 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Aitken v Director of Public Prosecutions – WLR Daily

Posted April 30th, 2015 in law reports, media, publishing, reporting restrictions by sally

Aitken v Director of Public Prosecutions [2015] EWHC 1079 (Admin); [2015] WLR (D) 184

‘The editor of a newspaper did not as a matter of law fall outside the scope of the expression “any person who publishes” for the purposes of the offence of publishing information likely to lead to the identification of a child witness/victim in criminal proceedings, contrary to section 39(2) of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933.’

WLR Daily, 23rd April 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Chilcot inquiry into Iraq War ‘unlikely to be published this year’ – The Independent

Posted April 21st, 2015 in delay, inquiries, Iraq, news, publishing, reports by sally

‘The British inquiry into the 2003 Iraq war and its aftermath, which completed its last hearing in February 2011 with the promise to report back in “some months”, is unlikely to be published this year.’

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The Independent, 21st April 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk