Man jailed for targeting grieving families with online abuse – Crown Prosecution Service

‘A man who admitted targeting Facebook memorial pages with sickening messages has been jailed for 14 months today (15 Oct) at Newcastle Crown Court.’

Full press release

Crown Prosecution Service, 15th November 2018

Source: www.cps.gov.uk

Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust: Supreme Court confirms duty of care exists on non-medical A&E staff – Cloisters

‘In a unanimous judgment delivered on 10th October 2018, the Supreme Court reminded practitioners that there is no need to consider the Caparo v Dickman test in every case where the existence of a duty of care is in issue, and that judges must be careful not to conflate issues relevant to the existence of a duty with those relevant to whether or not the duty has been breached.’

Full Story

Cloisters, 18th October 2018

Source: www.cloisters.com

Criminal law not keeping pace with digital world – report – The Guardian

‘Online communications law is incoherent and fails to protect victims of abuse from harassment such as “deepfake” pornography, according to a report by the Law Commission.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 1st November 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust – Law Pod UK

‘In Darnley v Croydon NHS Trust [2018] UKSC 50 the Supreme Court has ruled that hospitals are liable for the actions and statements of their non-medical staff in A & E. Rosalind English discusses the implications of this judgment with Owain Thomas QC.’

Full Story

Law Pod UK, 15th October 2018

Source: audioboom.com

Supreme Court rules that hospital receptionist owes a duty of care to a patient — Owain Thomas QC – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously allowed the appeal of Michael Darnley in Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust [2018] UKSC 50, holding that a hospital receptionist owed a duty of care to a patient at A&E, which was breached by providing him with incorrect information as to how long he was likely to have to wait before being seen or triaged.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 11th October 2018

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Parents ‘weaponising’ domestic violence orders, claims charity – The Guardian

‘The number of non-molestation orders – issued by courts to prevent domestic abuse – has rocketed by 37% over the past five years because they are being exploited to secure legal aid, according to the charity Families Needs Fathers.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 15th October 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Woman’s Own forced to print front-page correction about actor – The Guardian

Posted October 10th, 2018 in communicating false information, complaints, media, news, ombudsmen, women by sally

‘The former Coronation Street star Denise Welch has forced Woman’s Own to print a front-page correction after the magazine made false claims about her without any evidence, in a move that could have repercussions for other glossy gossip publications.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 9th October 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Dyslexic ex-sergeant Colin Hughes jailed for forgery – BBC News

Posted July 28th, 2017 in communicating false information, dyslexia, forgery, news, police, sentencing by tracey

‘A dyslexic former police officer has been jailed for forgery after he was caught out by his bad spelling.’

Full Story

BBC News, 28th July 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Anonymity – London Review of Books

‘Anonymous and pseudonymous publication has a long history. It may now be the exception in literary and specialist journalism, but at the start of the 19th century it was pretty much the rule – to the extent that France in 1850 legislated to forbid the publication of unsigned articles on philosophical, political and religious subjects. A new book by Eric Barendt, Anonymous Speech: Literature, Law and Politics (Hart, £25), traces the contemporaneous voluntary abandonment of anonymity in England and the often pompous arguments that accompanied it. The fact was that journals’ recruitment of well-known writers – Thackeray, Dickens – was starting to put a premium on names. So when the Fortnightly Review started up in 1865, it announced that all its articles would be signed and free of editorial pressure. By contrast, from its foundation in 1913 the New Statesman anonymised its contributors, though the editor, having explained that this was necessary in order to establish a common style and tone, couldn’t resist announcing that Sidney Webb and Bernard Shaw would be writing for it. In 1925 the Spectator, after not quite a hundred years of unsigned articles, abandoned anonymity, and the New Statesman followed. Articles in the TLS remained anonymous until 1974, and obituaries in the Times and Telegraph are unsigned to this day. So are the entirety of the Economist and the bulk of Private Eye.’

Full story

London Review of Books, 19th January 2017

Source: www.lrb.co.uk

Iraq War: Lawyer admits misconduct over Army abuse claims – BBC News

‘A human rights lawyer who brought murder and torture claims against UK troops has admitted misconduct charges.’

Full story

BBC News, 8th December 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

JJB Sports boss Christopher Ronnie guilty of £1m fraud – BBC News

Posted November 21st, 2014 in communicating false information, fraud, news by tracey

‘The former chief executive of JJB Sports has been convicted of accepting more than £1m in backhanders.’

Full story

BBC News, 20th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Sheffield police stations bomb hoaxer Amanda Pinder jailed – BBC News

Posted May 9th, 2014 in bomb hoaxing, communicating false information, news, sentencing by sally

‘A woman who threatened to blow up every police station in Sheffield in a series of hoax calls has been jailed.’

Full story

BBC News, 8th May 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Harlow bomb hoaxer Nigel Flanaghan jailed – BBC News

Posted February 7th, 2014 in bomb hoaxing, communicating false information, news, sentencing by tracey

‘A man who phoned police and said he was going to put a bomb in a mosque and wanted “to hang Muslims in the street” has been jailed for 12 months.’

Full story

BBC News, 6th February 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

NHS ‘cover-up culture’ to be tackled with fines – The Guardian

“Hospitals that give false information about death rates will face unlimited fines under new powers aimed at preventing another Mid-Staffordshire-style health scandal.”

Full story

The Guardian, 10th May 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

The largest number of defendants in British legal history? Twitter users brace themselves for barrage of lawsuits from Lord McAlpine – The Independent

Posted November 19th, 2012 in communicating false information, defamation, internet, news, prosecutions by sally

“Users of the social networking site Twitter who wrongly linked Tory peer, Lord McAlpine, with the North Wales care home child abuse scandal, are bracing themselves for a barrage of lawsuits.”

Full story

The Independent, 19th November 2012

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Why careless Tweeting could cost a fortune – Daily Telegraph

Posted November 19th, 2012 in communicating false information, damages, defamation, internet, news by sally

“Media lawyer Amber Melville-Brown explains why careless Tweeting of Lord McAlpine’s name could prove expensive for those who publish and repeat libellous remarks.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 18th November 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Hoax caller jailed for sparking national terror alert – Daily Telegraph

“Hoax caller Khadar Mohidin has been jailed for sparking a national terror alert by ringing police and claiming 15 suicide bombers were about to attack London on the day Hillary Clinton was to meet with David Cameron.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 17th July 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Man jailed for plane bomb hoax against online girlfriend – The Guardian

“A man who told police his online girlfriend was going to blow up a plane after she deleted him from her Facebook account has been jailed for 16 weeks.”

Full story

The Guardian, 8th June 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Tesco accused of misleading viewers over animal welfare – Daily Telegraph

Posted September 14th, 2011 in advertising, animals, communicating false information, food, news, ombudsmen by tracey

“The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has banned Tesco from re-broadcasting a television advert that appeared to show pigs roaming freely in a field following complaints by viewers.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 14th September 2011

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Some discount voucher adverts have been misleading, advertising watchdog says – OUT-LAW.com

“The UK’s advertising watchdog has resolved more than 50 cases involving discount voucher adverts since March, the watchdog has said.”

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 30th August 2011

Source: www.out-law.com