MP refers Sunday Mirror to police and press regulator over sex sting – The Guardian

‘One of the Conservative MPs who was contacted by a Sunday Mirror reporter posing as a woman interested in sex is to write to the Metropolitan police over the tabloid sting. Mark Pritchard said he would contact Scotland Yard and make a formal complaint to the Independent Press Standards Organisation (Ipso) over accusations of entrapment.’

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The Guardian, 29th September 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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When Is Whistleblowing in the Public Interest? – No. 5 Chambers

Posted September 25th, 2014 in appeals, employment tribunals, news, public interest, whistleblowers by sally

‘Jack Feeny explores the new law in relation to protected disclosures following the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 19th September 2014

Source: www.no5.com

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Proposed Legislative Changes To Judicial Review: The Current Position – No. 5 Chambers

Posted September 24th, 2014 in bills, costs, criminal justice, human rights, judicial review, news, public interest by sally

‘The Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, which introduces significant changes to judicial review, is making rapid progress through Parliament. The House of Lords Committee stage completed on 30 July 2014 and all that remains now is the House of Lords report stage due at the end of October, with royal assent expected by the end of the year. Whilst there are indications that certain members of the Lords disagree with some of the provisions and some may yet be amended or frustrated, the current version of the Bill retains the significant provisions on judicial review.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 18th September 2014

Source: www.no5.com

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Data protection and journalism – ICO publishes guidance – Panopticon

‘The Information Commissioner has today published his keenly anticipated guidance on ‘Data Protection and Journalism: A Guide for the Media’. The guidance has been published following a lengthy consultative process and in response to a recommendation made in the Leveson report.’

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Panopticon, 4th September 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Parents who lose objectivity – Education Law Blog

Posted September 1st, 2014 in anonymity, bullying, contracts, damages, fees, media, news, public interest, racism, school children by sally

‘It is not often that private law disputes between schools and parents are pursued to trial and judgment in the High Court, but St Christopher School (Letchworth) Ltd v Schymanski and Rao [2014] EWHC 2573 (QB) is one of those cases.’

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Education Law Blog, 28th August 2014

Source: www.education11kbw.com

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What’s in store for family migrants after the Court of Appeal decision in MM? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted August 20th, 2014 in appeals, families, human rights, immigration, news, public interest, remuneration by tracey

‘Since 28 July the Home Office has resumed processing applications that were on hold pending the Court of Appeal decision in MM. In that case, the Court of Appeal held the minimum income threshold and associated documentary requirements set out in Appendix FM and Appendix FM-SE to the Immigration Rules to be lawful.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 19th August 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Accountant’s reports safe from public exposure after FoI ruling – Legal Futures

‘The Law Society’s freedom of information adjudicator has rejected a bid to open up public access to accountant’s reports submitted to the Solicitors Regulation Authority.’

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Legal Futures, 20th August 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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M v Times Newspapers Ltd and others – WLR Daily

M v Times Newspapers Ltd and others [2014] EWCA Civ 1132; [2014] WLR (D) 371

‘The decision of a court to allow publication of a report which might lead to the identification of a person who had been arrested but not charged with any offence and was not a party to criminal proceedings would not be interfered with unless the court, in carrying out the evaluative exercise of balancing the competing public interest of freedom of expression in a report of court proceedings against the person’s right to private and family life, had erred in principle or reached a conclusion which was plainly wrong.’

WLR Daily, 1st August 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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RSPCA prosecute family over cat’s long hair – Daily Telegraph

‘Richard and Samantha Byrnes express their relief after the Crown Prosecution Service steps in and orders the RSPCA to halt an animal cruelty case against them.’

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Daily Telegraph, 10th August 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Appeal court backs publication of arrest names – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A man arrested but never charged over sexual offences has failed to persuade the Court of Appeal that newspapers should be barred from identifying him.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 5th August 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Regina (Maries) v Merton London Borough Council – WLR Daily

Regina (Maries) v Merton London Borough Council [2014] EWHC 2689 (Admin); [2014] WLR (D) 357

‘In exercising the power to appropriate land under section 122(1) of the Local Government Act 1972, the statutory question that had to be determined was whether the land remained, or was no longer, required for a particular purpose, meaning no longer needed in the public interest of the locality for that purpose. That was a question for the local authority and not the court, subject to principles of Wednesbury reasonableness.’

WLR Daily, 31st August 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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The death of privacy – The Guardian

‘Google knows what you’re looking for. Facebook knows what you like. Sharing is the norm, and secrecy is out. But what is the psychological and cultural fallout from the end of privacy?’

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The Guardian, 3rd August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Serious procedural faults in the appointment of judges: an urgent matter of public interest – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted July 9th, 2014 in judiciary, news, professional conduct, public interest by sally

‘As part of the current debate on identifying the best values of British culture and society, the proper workings of the British legal system, would surely have to occupy a prominent place. After all, it is the judiciary that would enhance the sense of wellbeing of its citizen every time that justice is felt to have been established.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 9th July 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Met must respond to spy allegations in undercover police case, court rules – The Guardian

‘The Metropolitan police cannot use its policy of “neither confirm nor deny” in response to damages claims brought by women who claim they were tricked into forming relationships with undercover officers.’

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The Guardian, 2nd July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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You cannot be serious! Peers call ‘out’ on Government’s judicial review reforms – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Last night saw the House of Lords’ first reaction to the Government’s proposed changes to judicial review as the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill had its second reading. Already dissected at some length in this blog, the proposals have been roundly criticised by both the senior judiciary and the Joint Committee on Human Rights. Consultations responses, including from JUSTICE, expressed concern that the measures appear, by design or coincidence, to undermine the rule of law, inhibit transparency and shield the Government from judicial scrutiny. Two key concerns arise from the Government proposals: restricting access for individuals without substantial means and limiting the courts’ discretion to do justice in the public interest. Yesterday’s debate was robust and eloquent, with former Law Lords joined by bishops and backbenchers alike to condemn the new measures.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 1st July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Phone hacking: it was right to charge Rebekah Brooks, says Keir Starmer – The Guardian

‘Prosecutors were right to charge Rebekah Brooks and other News of the World executives over conspiracy to hack phones as the trials have helped determine who knew about widespread malpractice at the newspaper, Sir Keir Starmer, the former director of public prosecutions, has said.’

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The Guardian, 29th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Fairness under the DPA: public interests can outweigh those of the data subject – Panopticon

Posted June 19th, 2014 in data protection, news, police, professional conduct, public interest by sally

‘Suppose a departing employee was the subject of serious allegations which you never had the chance properly to investigate or determine. Should you mention these (unproven) allegations to a future employer? Difficult questions arise, in both ethical and legal terms. One aspect of the legal difficulty arises under data protection law: would it be fair to share that personal information with the prospective employer?’

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Panopticon, 18th June 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Do Not Resuscitate notices: Patients’ rights under Article 8 – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal has declared that the failure of a hospital to consult a patient in their decision to insert a Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Notice in her notes was unlawful and in breach of her right to have her physical integrity and autonomy protected under Article 8.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 17th June 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Secret trials – a little transparency, a lot to worry about – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal has published its decision in Guardian News Media v AB and CD. It is not a judgment, the Court says. Judgments – plural – will be given “in due course.” Still, the 24 paragraph decision contains the order and explanation of the order, and gives an indication of some of the reasons that will follow.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 12th June 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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‘Secret’ terror trial ruling due at Old Bailey – BBC News

‘The Court of Appeal is to rule on whether a trial of two terrorist suspects can be heard in secret.’

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BBC News, 12th June 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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