Council tenants lose lifetime right to live in property – The Guardian

Posted December 10th, 2015 in bills, housing, landlord & tenant, leases, local government, news, time limits by sally

‘People will no longer have the right to live in their council home for life in future after ministers moved to impose a five-year limit on new tenancies.’

Full story

The Guardian, 9th December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Automatic Permission for Housing on Brownfield Sites – No. 5 Chambers

Posted December 9th, 2015 in bills, housing, news, planning by sally

‘The National Planning Policy Framework’s paragraph 17 lists 12 core land-use planning principles, including “encourage the effective use of land by reusing land that has been previously developed (brownfield land), provided that it is not of high environmental value”. Within Green Belts its paragraph 89 lists six circumstances where the construction of new buildings is not inappropriate, including “… the partial or complete redevelopment of previously developed sites (brownfield land), whether redundant or in continuing use (excluding temporary buildings), which would not have a greater impact on the openness of the Green Belt and the purpose of including land within it than the existing development”. Its paragraph 111 states, “Planning policies and decisions should encourage the effective use of land by re-using land that has been previously developed (brownfield land), provided that it is not of high environmental value. Local planning authorities may continue to consider the case for setting a locally appropriate target for the use of brownfield land.”’

Full story

No. 5 Chambers, 1st December 2015

Source: www.no5.com

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That’s Entertainment? The Anonymity of Arrestees and the Law – Doughty Street

‘Last week, The Mirror reported that John Leslie was being questioned by police in connection with an alleged sexual assault. The report contained photographs of the police with evidence bags outside Leslie’s house. The Mirror reminded its readers of allegations made against the former TV presenter in 2002 and 2008. This the most recent example of media reports concerning allegations of sexual offences involving public figures.’

Full story

Doughty Street, 2nd December 2015

Source: www.doughtystreet.co.uk

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MPs overturn Lords bid to ​give 16- and​​ 17-year-olds right to vote – The Guardian

Posted December 9th, 2015 in bills, EC law, elections, news, parliament, referendums, young persons by sally

‘Labour lords are preparing to defy the House of Commons after it blocked their proposals to let 16- and 17-year-olds vote in the EU referendum.’

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The Guardian, 8th December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Serious Personal Injury Litigation – A Quantum Update – Byrom Chambers

‘We are now bombarded with case reports by email and over the Internet. The reporting of 1st instance quantum decisions used to be a comparative rarity before 1992 and the PIQR. Even then there was a time lag in publication and many decisions were never covered. On one level, we are immensely fortunate now to be able to discern how the best counsel and 1st instance judges set about their respective tasks in serious personal injuries litigation; but with that opportunity comes the obligation on the serious practitioner to take the time really to get to grips with the lengthy judgments. It is not easy. This paper, evolving since the autumn of 2007, is an exercise in the on-going fulfilment of that obligation.’

Full story

Byrom Chambers, 7th December 2015

Source: www.byromstreet.com

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Prisons to introduce tests for legal highs in bid to reduce violence – The Guardian

‘Ministers claim the introduction of new drug tests able to detect legal highs such as spice and black mamba will prove a “gamechanger” in curbing the rising tide of violence in jails across England and Wales.’

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The Guardian, 1st December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Theresa May accused of rushing surveillance bill through back door – The Guardian

Posted November 27th, 2015 in bills, intelligence services, internet, investigatory powers, news, parliament by sally

‘The home secretary, Theresa May, has been accused of fast-tracking her “snooper’s charter” legislation by the back door after giving a scrutiny committee of MPs and peers only three weeks to consider the 299-page bill.’

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The Guardian, 26th November 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Transcript of the Lord Chief Justice’s Annual Press Conference 2015 – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

‘The Lord Chief Justice, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, held his annual press conference on Tuesday, 17 November, 2015, at the Royal Courts of Justice.’

Full transcript

Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 17th November 2015

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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Don’t Fast-Track the Investigatory Powers Bill: A reply to Lord Carlile – Natasha Simonsen and Cian Murphy – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted November 17th, 2015 in bills, investigatory powers, legislation, news, terrorism by tracey

‘Lord Carlile QC, former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, has said that in the aftermath of the Paris attacks last weekend, Parliament should fast-track the Investigatory Powers Bill into law. Given his extensive experience in the field, Lord Carlile’s views should not be taken lightly. But Lord Carlile is wrong. To fast-track the Investigatory Powers Bill is undesirable and unnecessary. It would also end a crucial public conversation in a wrong-headed paroxysm of governmental action.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 16th November 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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MPs to assess technological feasibility of requirements under proposed new surveillance laws – OUT-LAW.com

‘MPs at the UK parliament will assess whether it is technologically feasible for companies to comply with new communication surveillance laws that have been proposed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 13th November 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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UK surveillance bill could bring ‘very dire consequences’, warns Apple chief – The Guardian

‘Apple’s chief executive has sharply criticised surveillance powers proposed by the British government, warning that allowing spies a backdoor route into citizens’ communications could have “very dire consequences”.’

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The Guardian, 10th November 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Bar Council comments on Draft Investigatory Powers Bill – The Bar Council

‘Responding to the publication of the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill, Alistair MacDonald QC, Chairman of the Bar, said: “The ‘double lock’ requirement of needing both judicial and senior ministerial authorisation for the most intrusive investigatory powers is not as secure as it is made out to be.” ‘

Full press release

The Bar Council, 5th November 2015

Source: www.barcouncil.org.uk

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Interception, Authorisation and Redress in the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted November 5th, 2015 in bills, interception, investigatory powers, news, tribunals, warrants by sally

‘The Government has published a draft Bill on Investigatory Powers that it hopes to see through Parliament within a year. If it becomes law, the Investigatory Powers Bill will replace much, but not all, of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, as well as the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 5th November 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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UK government to reform communication surveillance laws – OUT-LAW.com

‘Data recording what websites internet users have visited will need to be retained for up to 12 months by telecommunication service providers under proposed new surveillance laws that have been outlined by the UK government.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th October 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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UK surveillance powers explained – BBC News

‘A new law setting out what powers the UK state will have to monitor communications between citizens is set to be unveiled. How will it work?’

Full story

BBC News, 4th November 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Investigatory powers bill: snooper’s charter to remain firmly in place – The Guardian

Posted November 3rd, 2015 in bills, intelligence services, internet, investigatory powers, news, privacy by sally

‘The key elements of the snooper’s charter, including the bulk collection and storage for 12 months of everyone’s personal data, tracking their use of the web, phones and social media, will remain firmly in place when the government publishes its new investigatory powers bill on Wednesday.’

Full story

The Guardian, 2nd November 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Theresa May faces fight over web browsing access – The Guardian

Posted November 3rd, 2015 in bills, intelligence services, internet, investigatory powers, news, privacy, reports by sally

‘The home secretary, Theresa May, should not seek to give the intelligence agencies full access to an individual’s web browsing history, Labour and the former deputy prime minister Nick Clegg are both likely to say when the government publishes its draft investigatory powers bill on Wednesday.’

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The Guardian, 2nd November 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Respect the client’s right to legal privilege – MPs warned – The Bar Council

Posted November 2nd, 2015 in bills, investigatory powers, legal profession, press releases, privilege by tracey

‘The statutory protection of legally privileged communications between lawyers and their clients should be high on the agenda when Parliament debates major new surveillance legislation next month. The Bar Council and The Law Society have called for legal professional privilege to receive statutory protection in the forthcoming Investigatory Powers Bill.’

Full press release

The Bar Council, 22nd October 2015

Source: www.barcouncil.org.uk

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Theresa May says ‘contentious’ parts of web surveillance plan dropped – BBC News

Posted November 2nd, 2015 in bills, internet, investigatory powers, news, police by tracey

‘Police will be able to see websites people have visited but not the specific pages they have viewed without a warrant, under new government plans. Theresa May said the Investigatory Powers Bill will not have some “contentious” parts of the 2012 plan, dubbed a snooper’s charter by critics.’

Full story

BBC News, 1st November 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Police seek powers to access browsing history of UK computer users – The Guardian

Posted October 30th, 2015 in bills, internet, investigatory powers, news, police by sally

‘Police have lobbied the government for the power to view the internet browsing history of every computer user in Britain ahead of the publication of legislation on regulating surveillance powers.’

Full story

The Guardian, 30th October 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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