Parents set to lose right to veto sex education at age 15 – BBC News

Posted July 20th, 2018 in age of consent, news, parental rights, school children, veto by tracey

‘The government plans to let 15-year-olds overrule their parents’ wishes and opt in to sex education lessons they have previously been withdrawn from.’

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BBC News, 19th July 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

UK ministers blocking appointments to rights watchdog, say lawyers – The Guardian

‘The Equality and Human Rights Commission is running short of board members and struggling to fulfil its duties because, lawyers allege, ministers are repeatedly vetoing appointments on political grounds.’

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The Guardian, 18th December 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Court of Appeal confirms right of Gambling Commission to veto gambling in pubs – OUT-LAW.com

Posted May 30th, 2017 in appeals, gambling, licensing, news, veto by sally

‘The Gambling Commission in Britain can prevent pubs from providing gambling services to consumers even if those pubs satisfy the criteria necessary for obtaining an operating licence, the Court of Appeal in London has confirmed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 26th May 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

The government’s ‘English votes for English laws’ review: an assessment – UCL Constitution Unit

Posted April 7th, 2017 in constitutional law, devolution, news, parliament, reports, veto by tracey

‘Last Thursday the government published its technical review of the operation of the “English votes for English laws” (EVEL) procedures in the House of Commons. The review concluded against making “any substantive changes”. Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny argue that this is a missed opportunity. The decision to close down this chance for parliament to engage in meaningful debate about the EVEL system is regrettable, and may prove to be short-sighted.’

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UCL Constitution Unit, 5th April 2017

Source: www.ucl.ac.uk/constitution-unit

Brexit: Government suffers second defeat in Lords – BBC News

Posted March 8th, 2017 in amendments, bills, EC law, news, parliament, referendums, treaties, veto by tracey

‘The government has suffered a second Brexit defeat in the House of Lords as peers backed, by 366 votes to 268, calls for a “meaningful” parliamentary vote on the final terms of withdrawal.’

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BBC News, 7th March 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Davor Jancic: A Very Parliamentary Brexit: Satire in Two Acts – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted February 24th, 2017 in devolution, EC law, news, parliament, referendums, veto by sally

‘Brexit is a very parliamentary affair. The reason is that both the UK Parliament, the European Parliament and, in all likelihood, each of the parliaments of the EU Member States will have veto powers over the terms of Brexit. This gives them ample opportunities to influence the course of negotiations. Unless the wishes of all of these parliamentary bodies are accommodated, it will be a rather ‘hard’ Brexit indeed. This commentary examines the role of parliaments in the UK’s yet-to-be-triggered exit from the EU.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 23rd February 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

Theresa May faces new Brexit legal challenge – Daily Telegraph

Posted December 12th, 2016 in constitutional law, EC law, judicial review, news, Supreme Court, treaties, veto by sally

‘Theresa May faces a new challenge to her bid to start the process to take Britain out of the European Union after it emerged that opponents plan to launch a fresh legal action on Monday.’

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Daily Telegraph, 11th December 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Further reforms are needed to strengthen the powers of English MPs, says study – Daily Telegraph

Posted November 28th, 2016 in devolution, EC law, news, parliament, referendums, veto by tracey

‘Further reforms are needed to strengthen the powers of English MPs in Westminster, a new study has found.’

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Daily Telegraph, 28th November 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Plans to curb House of Lords powers ‘dropped’ – BBC News

Posted November 17th, 2016 in legislation, news, parliament, veto by sally

‘Plans to curb the power of the House of Lords have been dropped by the government, sources have told the BBC.’

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BBC News, 17th November 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

A judge-shaming list is bad for justice – The Guardian

‘Judges shouldn’t be frightened to set precedents. A list of those that have “gone too far” – including over a Guardian freedom of information request on the Prince of Wales’s letters – risks deterring justice.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Lords curbs will tilt balance of power towards government, say peers – BBC News

Posted March 23rd, 2016 in news, parliament, regulations, veto by tracey

‘Government plans to remove the House of Lords’ ability to veto some draft laws would “tilt the balance of power… towards government”, peers have said. A review of the Lords’ powers was set up after peers voted down planned tax credits cuts – later axed by ministers. But its scope has been criticised by two Lords committees who say its proposals would “damage” Parliament’s role and should be shelved.’

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BBC News, 23rd March 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

MPs better placed than judges to decide public interest, says attorney general – The Guardian

‘Politicians are frequently better placed than judges to decide what constitutes the public interest in releasing information about foreign relations, national security and other areas, according to the attorney general.’

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The Guardian, 8th February 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Lords veto powers ‘to be curtailed’ – BBC News

Posted December 17th, 2015 in constitutional reform, news, parliament, regulations, veto by tracey

‘David Cameron is preparing to use the full force of the law to clip the wings of the House of Lords after it blocked his welfare cuts, the BBC has learned. A review will say peers should lose their absolute veto over detailed laws known as secondary legislation. Peers will instead be offered a new power to send these laws back to the Commons, forcing MPs to vote again – but will only be able to do this once.’

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BBC News, 16th December 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Graham John Wheeler: When Should the Lords Reject Secondary Legislation? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On 26 October 2015, the House of Lords debated the Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015. The Regulations were approved, but subject to two riders. Critics claimed that these riders constituted “fatal” amendments, and that they were therefore tantamount to a rejection of the legislation. It was argued that it is constitutionally improper for the House of Lords to reject financial legislation in this way.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 7th December 2015

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

Government accused of risking ‘disunited kingdom’ as Commons approves English votes for English laws – Independent

Posted October 23rd, 2015 in bills, devolution, news, parliament, Scotland, veto by michael

‘The Government was accused of risking the creation of  a “disunited kingdom” after the Commons approved an historic change to give English MPs a veto over laws which affect only England.’

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Independent, 22nd October 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

‘Black Spiders’ case shows need for guidance on FOI veto powers – OUT-LAW.com

‘The UK government must give new guidance to public authorities on when government ministers can exercise powers of veto to prevent the disclosure of information under freedom of information (FOI) laws.’
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OUT-LAW.com, 2nd June 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

Publication of the Black Spider Memos: a hollow victory? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘On 13th April, the Guardian were finally able to publish the ‘black spider memos,’ private correspondence between Prince Charles and several government departments between September 2004 and March 2005.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 18th May 2015

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

R (on the application of Evans) and another (Respondents) v Attorney General (Appellant) – Supreme Court

R (on the application of Evans) and another (Respondents) v Attorney General (Appellant) [2015] UKSC 21 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 26th March 2015

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

Alison Young: R (Evans) v Attorney General [2015] UKSC 21 – the Anisminic of the 21st Century? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On Thursday 26th March the Supreme Court concluded, to the delight of The Guardian and the dismay of the Prime Minister, that communications between Prince Charles and government Ministers – the so-called ‘black spider memos’ – should be released. This has been a long saga, involving issues of freedom of information, discussion of constitutional conventions surrounding the behaviour of a Monarch in training, which now also includes the principle of legality and the nature of the relationship between parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law. Such a cornucopia of delights for constitutional lawyers guarantees that the case has earned its place in the ‘Constitutional law Case list Hall of Fame’, with the promise of further delight as the memos, once released and savoured, cast an insight into the relationship between the Crown and the Government.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 31st March 2015

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

The Tale of the Black Spider: The Supreme Court speaks – UK Human Rights Blog

‘And so, the long legal saga of the Black Spider Letters finally comes to a close.

I last blogged about this case back in October 2012. At that time, the Attorney General had ignited controversy by invoking a little-known power under section 53 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA).’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 27th March 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com