Wife of British wrestling champion refused UK visa – The Independent

‘The wife of a British wrestling champion who has won gold medals for the country has hit out at the UK’s “cruel” immigration rules after his wife was refused a visa.’

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The Independent, 17th April 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Priti Patel orders review into Ruth Williams lockdown killing – BBC News

‘A review into the death of a woman who was killed by her husband has been ordered by the home secretary. Anthony Williams, 70, was jailed for five years after admitting to the manslaughter of his wife Ruth, 67, in south Wales.’

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BBC News, 7th March 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Covid: Cwmbran man jailed for killing wife in lockdown – BBC News

‘A man has been jailed for five years for killing his wife during the first coronavirus lockdown in March.’

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BBC News, 18th February 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

The modern family – the interpretation of children, spouses and civil partners in older trust deeds – Wilberforce Chambers

‘It has become cliché to say that modern familial arrangements are vastly different now to how they were 50 years ago, but that does not make it any less true. In 2019, almost half of all births were outside of a marriage or civil-partnership, and 3,440 children were adopted from local authority care. With the passage of the Marriage (Same-Sex Couples) Act 2013, and the Civil Partnership (Opposite Sex Couples) Regulations 2019, the range of relationships that can be legally recognised, and the form that this recognition takes are also very different. Given the age of many settlements, traditional definitions of “children” or “spouse” can cause real difficulties.’

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Wilberforce Chambers, 17th February 2021

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

Proprietary Estoppel and the Matrimonial Home on the Death of a Spouse – Anaghara v Anaghara & Ors [2020] EWHC 3091 – Pump Court Chambers

Posted November 24th, 2020 in bereavement, domicile, estoppel, married persons, matrimonial home, news by sally

‘It is rare that a spouse needs to pursue a claim in proprietary estoppel to secure occupation of a matrimonial home owned by the other spouse on the latter’s death: the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependants) Act 1975 will usually provide a remedy. But where, as here, the deceased is not domiciled in England and Wales the 1975 Act does not apply and an interesting point arises. The trial judge had found that there had been repeated representations to the effect that the wife might live in the property for so long as she wished made over a period of more than 20 years. The wife had reasonably relied upon those representations (understandably so one might think). However, the estate argued that the wife’s long “rent-free” occupation of the property owned by her husband counted as a “countervailing benefit” which the court was obliged to weigh in the balance and might mitigate or extinguish her equity. Such a countervailing benefit has been taken into account in the case of a licensee who harvests a crop (Henry v Henry [2010] UKPC 3) of a live-in carer paying no rent (Jennings v Rice [2002] EWCA 159) and of a son-in-law paying no rent to his parents-in-law after the death of his wife (Sledmore v Dalby (1996) 72 P & CR 196). In the latter case the benefit was sufficient wholly to extinguish the equity.’

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Pump Court Chambers, 20th November 2020

Source: www.pumpcourtchambers.com

Ex-headteacher jailed for murder of estranged wife and lover – The Guardian

Posted October 2nd, 2020 in families, imprisonment, married persons, murder, news, sentencing by tracey

‘A former headteacher has been jailed for a minimum of 31 years for murdering his estranged wife and her lover on New Year’s Day.’

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The Guardian, 1st October 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Marriage discrimination: Gould v St Johns Downshire Hill UKEAT/0002/20/BA – 3PB

‘The Claimant, Mr Gould, was a vicar of an evangelical Christian church, St Johns, Downshire Hill, in Hampstead, London (the Respondent). In August 2016, he was dismissed from his role. The reason given by the Respondent was an irretrievable breakdown in relations between the Claimant and the Trustees, the Leadership Team, certain members of staff and other members of the congregation. The Claimant alleged that the reason for his dismissal was the breakdown of his marriage in May 2015. He brought a claim to the ET, alleging direct marriage discrimination, and that his dismissal was for a discriminatory reason and procedurally unfair.’

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3PB, 1st July 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Wife who beat husband to death with a hammer permitted to inherit his estate: Challen v Challen [2020] EWHC 1330 (Ch) – New Square Chambers

‘On 15 August 2010 Sally Challen beat her husband to death with a hammer, wrapped him in a curtain before washing the dishes and driving home. She was convicted of murder on 23 June 2011 and sentenced to life imprisonment, but last year that conviction was quashed by the Court of Appeal. Before the retrial the Crown accepted a guilty plea to a lesser charge of Manslaughter by reason of diminished responsibility, and Mrs Challen was released, having already served her sentence. The Forfeiture rule prevented her inheriting her husband’s estate or taking their joint assets by succession, and in September 2019 she issued proceedings under the Forfeiture Act 1982 for relief.’

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New Square Chambers, June 2020

Source: www.newsquarechambers.co.uk

Indefinite Leave to Remain as a Bereaved Partner – Richmond Chambers

Posted June 2nd, 2020 in bereavement, coronavirus, immigration, married persons, news by sally

‘Daily reports of death during the Covid-19 pandemic has made many of us think about loved ones, how to protect them and the implications of life without them. If your leave to enter or remain is dependent on a relationship, what does happen if a partner passes away? The Immigration Rules in fact provide a route for indefinite leave to remain (ILR) as a bereaved partner. In this post we look at the requirements.’

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Richmond Chambers, 22nd May 2020

Source: immigrationbarrister.co.uk

Causing the death of another and the Forfeiture Rule: Amos v Mancini [2020] EWHC 1063 (Ch) – New Square Chambers

Posted May 29th, 2020 in dangerous driving, forfeiture, married persons, news, wills by sally

‘In January 2019 Mrs Amos, aged 74, was driving with her husband near their home in Llandeilo, when they collided with the car in front. Her husband later died from his injuries and Mrs Amos pleaded guilty to causing death by dangerous driving and was given a suspended prison sentence and disqualified from driving. The question arose whether she was prevented from benefitting under her husband’s will, or from receiving by survivorship his share of their home, which was owned as beneficial joint tenants.’

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New Square Chambers, 12th May 2020

Source: www.newsquarechambers.co.uk

Changes to Capital Gains Tax Reliefs When Spouses and Civil Partners Separate – Pump Court Chambers

‘Among all the other changes being made to people’s financial arrangements, firstly as a result of our anticipated Brexit, and then as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, and their concomitant impact on economies, both macro and micro, share values, savings rates and property values, it’s easy to forget that significant changes have also been made to personal tax arrangements. For those in marriages or civil partnerships who are separating, or for those who have already separated and are going through divorce or dissolution proceedings and their associated financial remedy proceedings, that includes changes to Capital Gains Tax.’

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Pump Court Chamber, 27th April 2020

Source: www.pumpcourtchambers.com

What is a ‘relationship akin to marriage’? – Richmond Chambers

‘Under the Immigration Rules, a person who is British or Settled in the UK can bring their unmarried partner to the UK. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘partner visa’ or ‘de facto visa’. This is an option that more couples are currently considering, partly due to the ongoing restrictions around the world on wedding ceremonies due to covid-19.’

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Richmond Chambers, 1st May 2020

Source: immigrationbarrister.co.uk

Implications of Coronavirus for UK Spouse Visas – Richmond Chambers

‘The Coronavirus and Covid-19 disease are causing a devastating effect across the world. The situation can be especially stressful for individuals who are separated from family members or for those who are worried that their partner may be separated from them if an application to remain in the UK is refused. In this post we will look at some of the key issues that individuals applying to remain with spouses and partners might need to consider in the coming months.’

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Richmond Chamber, 7th April 2020

Source: immigrationbarrister.co.uk

York House (Chelsea) Ltd v Edward Thompson (1) and Domitila Thompson (2) [2019] EWHC 2203 (Ch) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted March 17th, 2020 in gifts, landlord & tenant, leases, married persons, news by sally

‘A husband and wife who are the joint freeholders of a block of flats, granted a number of leases of various parts of that block to one or other of themselves. These were found to be disposals which were exempt from the provisions of part 1 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1987 (‘the 1987 Act’), either because these were gifts to family under s.4(2)(e) or disposals within a family under s.4(2)(h).’

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Tanfield Chambers, 25th February 2020

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

The Court of Appeal provides guidance on unexplained wealth orders in NCA v Hajiyeva – 5 SAH

‘Sarah Wood provides her Corporate Crime analysis for Lexis Nexis PSL in relation to recent case of NCA v Hajiyeva: Mrs Hajiyeva’s case attracted a great deal of publicity when the unexplained wealth order (UWO) was imposed upon her in February 2018. Known for her lavish spending in Harrods, her case caught the interest of the press—not least as it was the first UWO to have been obtained.’

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5 SAH, 25th February 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Wife’s guarantee to bank unenforceable due to husband’s undue influence (Syndicate Bank v Dansingani) – 4 New Square

‘Banking & Finance analysis: Ben Archer, barrister, at 4 New Square, examines a High Court decision that a guarantee given by the first defendant company director to secure the company’s liabilities to the claimant bank was enforceable but a similar guarantee given by the second defendant company director, who was the first defendant’s wife, was not enforceable as her execution of it had resulted from his undue influence.’

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4 New Square, 7th February 2020

Source: www.4newsquare.com

Jailed banker’s wife at centre of first McMafia order loses appeal to have case dismissed – The Independent

Posted February 7th, 2020 in appeals, banking, fraud, married persons, news, proceeds of crime by tracey

‘The wife of a jailed “fat cat banker” who splurged millions at Harrods has lost her appeal over the UK’s first so-called McMafia wealth order.’

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The Independent, 6th February 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Woman who spent £16m in Harrods says court order is ‘intrusive’ – The Guardian

‘A woman who spent £16m at Harrods has launched a legal challenge to try to overturn the UK’s first unexplained wealth order (UWO) that would force her to reveal the source of her fortune.’

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The Guardian, 12th December 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Islamist fighter’s wife Amaani Noor guilty of £34 terror donation – BBC News

Posted December 13th, 2019 in families, internet, Islam, marriage, married persons, news, terrorism by sally

‘A woman who married an Islamist fighter online has been convicted of funding terrorism.‎’

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BBC News, 12th December 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

What are ‘insurmountable obstacles’ to family life? – Richmond Chambers

Posted December 4th, 2019 in families, human rights, immigration, married persons, news by sally

‘What happens when an applicant for leave to remain in the UK as the partner of a British or settled person does not meet all of the requirements of the immigration rules? They may still be able to acquire leave to remain on the basis of their right to private and family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. This will be possible if they are able to show that they would face ‘insurmountable obstacles to family life continuing outside the UK with that partner’ as outlined in EX.1.(b) of the Immigration Rules.’

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Richmond Chambers, 29th November 2019

Source: immigrationbarrister.co.uk