Impact of Brexit on legal services “a cause for concern”, justice committee says – Legal Futures

‘The justice select committee has described the impact of Brexit on legal services as “a cause for concern, but not hyberbole”, in a report published today.’

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Legal Futures, 22nd March 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Arbitrator justified in making losing party pay £2m cost of third-party funding, High Court rules – Litigation Futures

Posted October 6th, 2016 in arbitration, costs, international courts, news, third parties by tracey

‘A defendant whose conduct forced the claimant to seek third-party funding to take its case to arbitration has to pay the £2m owed to the funder following the claim’s success, the High Court has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 3rd October 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Paying the Price of Love: Costs in Hague Cases – Family Law Week

Posted September 27th, 2016 in child abduction, civil procedure rules, costs, international courts, news, treaties by sally

‘Sarah Lucy Cooper, barrister of Thomas More Chambers, considers the circumstances in which a respondent might secure a costs order against an applicant in Hague Convention abduction proceedings.’

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Family Law Week, 21st September 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Sheryn Omeri considers the Chilcot Report and its implications for Blair and victims of war in Iraq – Cloisters

‘At 11am on 6 July 2016, the report of the 7-year-long Iraq Inquiry was released.’

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Cloisters, 11th July 2016

Source: www.cloisters.com

Britain will still be bound by international courts under any serious trade deal, MPs warned – The Independent

‘Britain would still be bound by the judgments of international courts under any serious international free trade agreement with other countries, a leading legal academic has warned MPs.’

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The Independent, 5th July 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Outrage as war crimes prosecutors say Tony Blair will not be investigated over Chilcot’s Iraq war report – but British soldiers could be – Daily Telegraph

‘Prosecutors at the International Criminal Court will examine the Chilcot report for evidence of abuse and torture by British soldiers but have already ruled out putting Tony Blair on trial for war crimes.’

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Daily Telegraph, 2nd July 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

If the Chilcot report finds the Iraq invasion violated the UN Charter, what are the consequences? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted June 28th, 2016 in inquiries, international courts, Iraq, news, reports, treaties, United Nations, war by sally

‘The Chilcot report, when published next month, will surely criticise some of those responsible for launching the Iraq war on 20 March 2003 and for the suffering and damage which it caused. Lawyers are certainly already mulling over the prospect of litigation, criminal as well as civil.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 27th June 2016

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

What sort of justice do survivors of sexual war crimes want? – The Guardian

‘Convicting perpetrators of sexual violence in conflict is a milestone but we also need to enable survivors to build their future.’

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The Guardian, 12th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

UK likely to ratify Unified Patent Court after EU referendum – OUT-LAW.com

Posted February 25th, 2016 in courts, intellectual property, international courts, news, patents, referendums by sally

‘UK law makers are not likely to ratify the creation of a new Unified Patent Court (UPC) until after the UK public votes on whether the country should remain a member of the EU, the UK government has confirmed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 24th February 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

The Unified Patent Court’s approach to interim injunctions will influence businesses’ patent strategies in Europe, say experts – OUT-LAW.com

‘The ease with which businesses will be able to win interim injunctions to defend against rivals’ infringements of their patents will be influential in determining whether companies engage with the new Unified Patent Court (UPC).’

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OUT-LAW.com, 22nd February 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

Resolving disputes over arbitration jurisdiction ‘good case management’ by English courts, experts say – OUT-LAW.com

‘By stepping in to resolve a dispute over the tribunal’s jurisdiction rather than leave the question to the tribunal, the English courts have in fact reinforced their commitment to support this form of dispute resolution.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 1st December 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

Greece drops option of legal action in British Museum Parthenon marbles row – The Guardian

Posted May 14th, 2015 in artistic works, international courts, news by tracey

‘Greece has ruled out taking legal action in its battle to reclaim the Parthenon marbles from Britain. The unexpected move abruptly ends the legal battle in one of the world’s most bitter cultural disputes.’

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The Guardian, 13th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

ICC to examine claims that British troops carried out war crimes in Iraq – The Guardian

‘Allegations that British troops were responsible for a series of war crimes after the invasion of Iraq are to be examined by the international criminal court (ICC) at The Hague, the specialist tribunal has announced.’

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The Guardian, 13th May 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Chagos Islands dispute: court to rule on UK sovereignty claim – The Guardian

‘Britain’s sovereignty over the Chagos Islands and America’s lease for the Diego Garcia military base could be thrown into doubt by an international court hearing due to open in Istanbul on Tuesday.’

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The Guardian, 21st April 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Pressure grows for inquiry into UK role in Iraq ‘war crimes’ – The Independent

‘Legal experts from around the world are to join calls for an investigation into whether British politicians and senior military figures should be prosecuted for alleged war crimes in Iraq.’

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The Independent, 12th January 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Ethics in International Arbitration: The Big Debate – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted November 21st, 2013 in arbitration, international courts, legal representation, news by sally

“International arbitration has something of a reputation as the ‘Wild West’ of the law; a land where personalities are at least as important (or perhaps more so) than procedural rules, and legal representatives can be viewed by their clients as hired guns.”

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 21st November 2013

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

Legal Process as a Tool to Rewrite History – Law, Politics and History – Gresham College Lecture

Posted February 14th, 2013 in international courts, international relations, news, war, war crimes by sally

“Trials at the ICTY concerned political violence and criminality that resulted from disintegration of a federation from which seven new successors states were formed. That process has been defined as a ‘clash of state projects’, where violence happened in areas claimed by two or more parties, or an aspiring state. The war crimes trials at the ICTY that resulted from overlapping territorial claims in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo produced a huge record of trial evidence. Problems in the very small state of Kosovo may be seen as the beginning of the violent process of disintegration, now known loosely as the Balkan wars of the 1990s. The conflict in Kosovo of 1998-9 may be seen as the end of those wars. Kosovo now seeks global recognition as an independent state but faces opposition both as to its international legal entitlements and as to how its history in the conflict should be viewed.”

Transcript

Lecture by Professor Sir Geoffrey Nice QC

Gresham College, 13th February 2013

Source: www.gresham.ac.uk

The end of Slobodan Milošević – Gresham College Lecture

Posted October 5th, 2012 in crimes against humanity, genocide, international courts, lectures, war crimes by tracey

“Slobodan Milošević died a few months before the end of his trial.  There were no closing arguments and there was no judgment by the judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia – the ICTY. Sir Geoffrey Nice had been preparing closing arguments as the case proceeded and will explain what some of them were.”

Transcript

Lecture by Sir Geoffrey Nice

Gresham College, 2nd October 2012

Source: www.gresham.ac.uk

International Criminal Tribunals: Experiments? Works in progress? Institutions that are here for good, or maybe not? – Gresham College Lecture

Posted September 13th, 2012 in crime, international courts, jurisdiction, lectures by tracey

“In the last twenty years several international courts have been established to try crimes committed in armed conflicts. Public expectation of what these courts may achieve is high; but are the courts living up to that expectation? Is the public expectation realistic and part of a liberal tradition; may it be seen as ‘judicial romantic’, according to courts capabilities they can never have? Are the courts always bound to be tainted by political influence that makes it probable they will ultimately fail? What sense can be made of the permanent International Criminal Court – the ICC – when Russia, China and the USA decline to accept its jurisdiction for their own citizens but can, as permanent members of the Security Council of the UN, refer individuals from other non-member states to the ICC for trial? And would it matter if the ICC failed? Has enough already been done to chart a way ahead that will allow the law a proper role in the service of countries, or communities in countries, at war? In any event, are war crimes trials the best partner of politics in the search for peace? Are there times when it may be better to let history go in the interests of a better safer future? This is a part of Sir Geoffrey Nice’s 2012/13 series of lectures as Gresham Professor of Law.”

Transcript

Lecture by Sir Geoffrey Nice

Gresham College, 12th September 2012

Source: www.gresham.ac.uk

Britain looking at filter system for Europe’s human rights court – Daily Telegraph

Posted December 21st, 2011 in human rights, international courts, news, Supreme Court by tracey

“The Justice Secretary said officials were working on a joint proposal with the Swiss that would ‘pave the way’ on what claims would be allowed to go to Strasbourg.”

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Daily Telegraph, 21st December 2011

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk