UK Trade Remedies Authority begins operating – OUT-LAW.com

‘A new regulator, with powers to investigate and address unfair trade practices and subsidies, has begun operating in the UK.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 2nd June 2021

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Food brands challenge deforestation rules in UK environment bill – The Guardian

Posted May 25th, 2021 in bills, environmental protection, fines, food, international trade, news, trees by sally

‘Trade associations representing leading food suppliers have questioned the need for new regulations to protect forests overseas, which will come before parliament in the environment bill on Wednesday.’

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The Guardian, 25th May 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Proposals to allow electronic documents would revolutionise trade – Law Commission

‘The Law Commission has announced a consultation on proposals to allow for the legal recognition of electronic versions of documents such as bills of lading and bills of exchange. If implemented, the reforms could revolutionise global trade and bring the processes into the 21st Century. We are also considering reform of the legal treatment of cryptoassets and digital assets and today published a call for evidence as part of that process (see below).’

Full press release

Law Commission, 30th April 2021

Source: https://www.lawcom.gov.uk/proposals-to-allow-electronic-documents-would-revolutionise-trade/

Court hearing over UK’s £400m tank deal debt to Iran postponed – The Guardian

Posted April 20th, 2021 in debts, detention, international trade, Iran, news, sanctions, weapons by sally

‘A high court hearing designed to resolve the UK’s non-payment of a £400m debt to Iran has been postponed again, leaving the families of dual nationals detained in Iran distraught since they believe the debt is critical to their release of loved ones.’

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The Guardian, 19th April 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ep 141: A hundred days since Brexit – Law Pod UK

Posted April 20th, 2021 in brexit, international trade, news, podcasts by sally

‘In the latest episode of 2903cb, Professor Catherine Barnard of the University of Cambridge casts her mind back over the weeks and months since we left the EU. What is her verdict?’

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Law Pod UK, 19th April 2021

Source: audioboom.com

Brexit: EU launches legal action against UK over ‘serious’ Northern Ireland protocol breach – The Independent

Posted March 16th, 2021 in brexit, international trade, news, Northern Ireland, treaties by tracey

‘Brussels has launched legal action against the UK government after Boris Johnson announced he would renege on parts of the deal he signed last year.’

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The Independent, 15th March 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

The environmental implications of the Brexit deal – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Most UK people’s 2020 Christmas eves were cheered by the news that we had some sort of Brexit deal – here, in all its majesty. Given the deadline for no deal, some deal, however thin, was a good deal better than nothing, with the ill-tempered chaos between the UK and a major trading partner which would have followed from the latter.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 18th January 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

UK faces new legal challenge over arms sales to Saudi Arabia – The Guardian

Posted October 27th, 2020 in international trade, judicial review, licensing, news, Saudi Arabia, weapons by sally

‘Campaigners have filed for a judicial review of the UK government’s decision to renew arms sales to Saudi Arabia.’

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The Guardian, 27th October 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Jeff King and Stephen Tierney: The House of Lords Constitution Committee reports on the United Kingdom Internal Market Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The United Kingdom Internal Market Bill is something of an imperfect storm, provoking the ire both of the devolved authorities who consider it an unacceptable circumscription of devolved competence and those aghast that the Bill empowers ministers to act contrary to the UK’s international obligations. Today the Constitution Committee reports on the measure and doesn’t pull its punches. Its highly critical analysis is informed by several evidence sessions involving academics, legal experts and prominent parliamentarians including the Lord Chancellor.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th October 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Brexit: EU launches legal action against UK for breaching withdrawal agreement – The Guardian

‘The EU has launched legal action against the UK after Boris Johnson failed to respond to Brussels’ demand that he drop legislation that would overwrite the withdrawal agreement and break international law.’

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The Guardian, 1st October 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

The importance of the Economic Interest Test in the UK’s new Trade Remedies Regime – Brexit Law

Posted September 24th, 2020 in brexit, EC law, international trade, news, regulations by sally

‘The UK’s new trade remedies regime contained in the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018 (“2018 Act”) has an economic interest test which is different from that of any other jurisdiction. Some jurisdictions, e.g. US and Australia, have chosen not to have one at all. The test is designed to ensure that only remedies that are in the UK’s economic interests taken as a whole will be adopted.’

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Brexit Law, 24th September 2020

Source: brexit.law

EP 115: The Agriculture Bill: a revolution in farming or a lost opportunity? – Law Pod UK

Posted June 9th, 2020 in agriculture, international trade, news, podcasts by sally

‘Rosalind English talks to senior policy advisor to the campaign group Compassion in World Farming about food security and the danger of pathogens in intensive livestock rearing. Does the Agriculture Bill address these issues or will new trade deals mean cheap imported meat over responsible farming?’

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Law Pod UK, 8th June 2020

Source: audioboom.com

Ivory ban upheld by Court of Appeal – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The overarching complaint was that the evidence base was insufficient. The appellant’s criticisms of Jay J’s analysis can be summarised as follows:

(i) wrongful use of the precautionary principle and the acceptance of inadequate evidence to support the bans;

(ii) failure to take account of the failings in the Impact Assessment which preceded the Bill and the according of too much deference to Parliament; and

(iii) violation of the principle of respect for property and the wrongful failure to require a right to compensation.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 19th May 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

How to divine statutory purpose: the Israel/arms trade disinvestment case – UK Human Rights Blog

‘This case is about Government “Guidance” aimed at local authorities, banning some of those “ethical” objections to investment policies but allowing other objections. “Guidance” in quotes because the net effect of the Act and secondary legislation was to make the Guidance mandatory: see [10] of Lord Wilson’s judgment. In particular, the policy ban was to apply to (a) boycotts to foreign nations and (b) UK defence industries. The sharp focus of the former was Israel. No surprises that the Quakers and the Campaign against the Arms Trade should appear in support of the challenge to the latter.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 29th April 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Hawala: why it is used and what family practitioners should know about it – Family Law Week

‘Byron James, Partner and Head of Expatriate Law in Dubai, explains the challenges presented to family lawyers by the effective method of anonymous international money transfer system used around the world.; why and what family practitioners should know about it.’

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Family Law Week, 20th November 2019

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Brexit legal advice warns of UK being trapped by Irish backstop – The Guardian

‘Legal advice on the Brexit deal, published reluctantly after MPs found the government in contempt of parliament, warns the terms of the Irish backstop could trap the UK in “protracted and repeated rounds of negotiations” in the years ahead.’

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The Guardian, 5th December 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Deal or No-deal? Brexit and financial services – Technology Law Update

Posted August 24th, 2018 in brexit, EC law, financial regulation, international trade, news by sally

‘On Monday, the Department for Exiting the EU published a presentation explaining the UK Government’s vision for the future UK-EU partnership on financial services, seeking to establish the principles of autonomy, bilaterality and co-operation.’

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Technology Law Update, 23rd August 2018

Source: www.technology-law-blog.co.uk

Hard Brexit “could cost legal sector £3bn” – Legal Futures

Posted August 22nd, 2018 in international trade, legal profession, legal services, news by sally

‘A hard Brexit could cost the legal sector up to £3bn by 2025, the Law Society has estimated.’

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Legal Futures, 22nd August 2018

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Activists bring case at appeal court over UK arms sales to Saudis – The Guardian

‘Human rights campaigners have begun an attempt to overturn a high court judgment that allows the British government to continue to export arms to Saudi Arabia for use in Yemen.
The Campaign Against Arms Trade brought the case against Liam Fox, the international trade secretary, seeking permission to appeal against a decision last July that granting licences for the export of arms from the UK to Saudi Arabia was not unlawful. CAAT has warned that British weapons could be used to kill or injure Yemeni civilians.’

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The Guardian, 12th April 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Trade Bill – renegotiation and renewal of EU trade agreements after Brexit – in this new constitutional territory more Parliamentary scrutiny is urgently needed – Brexit Law

‘The lack of adequate Parliamentary scrutiny when the UK negotiates trade agreements (something it has not done in its own right for many years) has come to the attention of the House of Commons International Trade Committee. This is timely given the prospect of the UK negotiating the single most important trade agreement it is likely to negotiate for a long time – its future trade agreement with the EU. The context for the Committee’s concern is its inquiry into the Trade Bill. One of the issues which the Bill addresses is the domestic implementation in the UK of those EU trade agreements which are adapted for continued application by the UK after Brexit. The Committee has asked whether Parliamentary scrutiny of ministerial rules implementing these agreements is adequate, and, more broadly, whether scrutiny of the UK signing up to these and other trade agreements, is adequate.’

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Brexit Law, 6th December 2017

Source: brexit.law