Improving UK Competitiveness, Strengthening the Rule of Law – Ministry of Justice

‘Dominic Raab addressed guests at the Policy Exchange in London for the launch of the Linklaters report ‘The Rule of Law: everyone has a part to play’.’

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Ministry of Justice, 7th December 2017

Source: www.gov.uk

The data protection bill is yet another legal threat to UK press freedom – The Guardian

‘Proposals to allow the information commissioner to assess journalists’ use of private information before publication could let the powerful off the hook.’

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The Guardian, 3rd December 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Equal Civil Partnerships: Implications of Strasbourg’s latest ruling for Steinfeld and Keidan – Helen Fenwick & Andy Hayward – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Equal civil partnerships divide opinions. For their proponents, access to such a status, and the legal benefits that follow, allows couples critical of marriage – whether same or different-sex – the ability to express their relationship through (in their view) a more appropriate, modern and egalitarian legal institution. Opponents question such a need in light of the availability of civil marriage, which has over centuries evolved and may not now necessarily be perceived as embodying the patriarchal or heteronormative values that its critics challenge. Calls for allowing different-sex as well as same-sex couples to enter civil partnerships in England and Wales have grown louder recently following the failed Equal Love case (Ferguson v UK), the production of several Private Members Bills and the on-going litigation in Steinfeld and Keidan v Secretary of State for Education, due to be heard by the Supreme Court in Spring 2018. The desire, however, for different-sex civil partnerships is not limited to this jurisdiction, and was recently explored for the first time by the Strasbourg court in Ratzenböck and Seydl v Austria. After exploring the background to this legal challenge, this post will critically analyse the reasoning of the Strasbourg Court and assess its implications for the challenge in Steinfeld.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st November 2017

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Rule of law in UK at risk after Brexit, says former supreme court president – The Guardian

‘The legal implications of leaving the EU have not been thought through, could overwhelm the supreme court and endanger the independence of the British judiciary, four senior retired judges have warned.’

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The Guardian, 21st November 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

No British judge on world court for first time in its 71-year history – The Guardian

Posted November 21st, 2017 in international courts, international relations, news, United Nations by sally

‘The UK will not have a judge on the bench of the international court of justice for the first time in its 71-year history after the British candidate withdrew following an acrimonious competition.’

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The Guardian, 20th November 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

‘Violent’ Somali criminal wins £80k payout for being unlawfully detained for 445 days – Daily Telegraph

‘A “prolific and violent offender” has won £78,500 damages from the Home Office for being unlawfully detained.’

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Daily Telegraph, 10th November 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Prisoners Will Finally Be Given The Vote, Say Reports – Rights Info

‘A limited number of prisoners will be allowed to vote ending the UK’s total ban on prisoners voting, according to reports.’

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Rights Info, 29th October 2017

Source: rightsinfo.org

Government reportedly planning to allow some UK prisoners to vote – The Guardian

‘The UK government is reportedly to scrap its blanket ban on prisoners being allowed to vote, 12 years after the European court of human rights ruled that it was unlawful.’

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The Guardian, 29th October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Bridge is not a sport and can’t have tax break, says European Court of Justice – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 27th, 2017 in EC law, international courts, news, sport, statutory interpretation, VAT by sally

‘Bridge is not a sport, European Union judges ruled today, in a decision that dealt a blow to British clubs’ hopes of a VAT tax break.’

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Daily Telegraph, 26th October 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Conscientious objection again: Adyan v Armenia – Law & Religion UK

‘In Adyan and Ors v Armenia [2017] ECHR 882, four Jehovah’s Witnesses had been convicted and imprisoned for refusing to perform either military or alternative civilian service.’

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Law & Religion UK, 16th October 2017

Source: www.lawandreligionuk.com

Brexit and Data Protection – Panopticon

Posted August 25th, 2017 in data protection, EC law, international courts, news, parliamentary papers by sally

‘Data protection lawyers and specialists have long been used to their area of expertise being treated as a rather mould-infested and irritating area of the law, like champerty but with more Schedules. Amongst other things, Brexit seems to have caused a bit of an upsurge in interest in how cross-border data flows are going to be managed in the brave new world. (Panopticon has seen articles in the last few months mentioning the GDPR and data protection after Brexit in the LRB and Private Eye, which is a bit like unexpectedly finding your girlfriend on page 3 of the Sun and the New Left Review on the same day.) HM Government have also recognised the importance of the issue, and have today published their position paper entitled ‘The exchange and protection of personal data’.It is fair to say that the 15 pages that you print off are not ram-packed (to use Mr Corbyn’s famed train-based term) with unexpected surprises, or indeed a huge amount of detail. There will doubtless be complaints about this, but to be fair, what the UK would like from the EU in the data protection is hardly rocket science. It spends a good deal of space explaining the importance of ensuring good levels of data protection, and enabling cross-border data flows, whilst also making quite an effort to emphasise how keen the UK has been, and still is, on being at the forefront of data protection. It even suggests that the DPA 1998 implemented the Directive beyond the minimum required; perfectly fairly it points out that the DPA didn’t have to cover law enforcement data processing but chose to do so, and surely our European friends will not be so impolite as to note, for example, the need for the Court of Appeal to strike down bits of the DPA as not properly implementing the Directive in Vidal-Hall…’

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Panopticon, 24th August 2017

Source: panopticonblog.com

Parks police dismissal does not engage article 8 – UK Police Law Blog

‘The recent case of Vining & Ors v London Borough of Wandsworth [2017] EWCA Civ 1092 represents an attempt to circumvent restrictions on certain types of officers from enjoying employment law rights – in a claim of unfair dismissal and for a protective award in respect of an alleged failure in collective consultation relating to their redundancies.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 15th August 2017

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Why a computer could help you get a fair trial – The Guardian

‘Recent research suggests that AI could make a valuable contribution to the judicial process.’

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The Guardian, 13th August 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

EU citizenship: all at sea? – New Law Journal

‘Jonathan Kingham explores the UK’s ‘offer’ on residency for EU citizens.’

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New Law Journal, 21st July 2017

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Council victorious in appeal over sex shop licensing fees – OUT-LAW.com

‘Westminster City Council can recover “reasonable” licensing fees and enforcement costs charged to various sex shops in Soho, London, even though these fees were later found to be in breach of an EU directive, the UK’s highest court has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 21st July 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Digital pirates – on a sinking ship? – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted July 19th, 2017 in copyright, EC law, international courts, internet, judgments, news, piracy by sally

‘On 14 June 2017, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) handed down its long-awaited judgment in Stichting Brein v Ziggo BV (C-610/15), concerning the activities of controversial file-sharing platform The Pirate Bay (TPB).’

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Law Society's Gazette, 17th July 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Implementation of ECHR judgments – have we reached a crisis point?- Lucy Moxham – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Last month, the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law and Leicester Law School convened a public event that asked an expert panel to consider these issues. Speakers included Merris Amos (Queen Mary University London); Dr Ed Bates (Leicester Law School); Eleanor Hourigan (Deputy Permanent Representative, UK Delegation to the Council of Europe); Nuala Mole (The AIRE Centre); and Prof Philip Leach (EHRAC, Middlesex University London and the European Implementation Network). Murray Hunt (Legal Adviser to the UK Joint Committee on Human Rights and incoming Director of the Bingham Centre) chaired the event.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th July 2017

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Dispute Resolution Post-Exit – Henderson Chambers

‘Both sides to the negotiations have already taken positions on the mechanisms for dispute settlement under the arrangements for the UK’s withdrawal from, and its future relationship with, the EU. As with other aspects of the negotiations, we have to hope that more flexibility will be shown on this issue, once the hard bargaining begins, than has seemed evident in the preparatory stage.’

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Henderson Chambers, 24th June 2017

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

How do citizens’ rights affect Brexit negotiations? – The Guardian

‘Protections for 1.2m Britons on continent and 3.5m Europeans in UK should be easy to settle in theory, but there are obstacles.’

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The Guardian, 23rd June 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

European Court of Justice ruling could open floodgates for spurious vaccination claims – Daily Telegraph

‘The European Court of Justice has been accused of undermining Britain’s vaccination programme after ruling that patients can sue for illnesses they believe were caused by jabs, even when there is no scientific evidence.’

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Daily Telegraph, 22nd June 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk