Government to ease requirements on publicity and consultation in latest measures to help planning system operate during COVID-19 – Local Government Lawyer

Posted May 15th, 2020 in consultations, coronavirus, easements, housing, local government, news, planning by sally

‘The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government has announced further, temporary measures to make it easier to operate the planning system during the coronavirus outbreak.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 13th May 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Government legal move risks councils ‘downing tools’ on support for disabled children – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The Department for Education has taken two key steps to relieve councils of duties related to children with special educational needs (SEN) during the Covid-19 crisis.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 1st May 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

The Coronavirus Act 2020 – Adult social care and assessing needs – Landmark Chambers

‘The social care provisions are at section 15 and Schedule 12 to the Coronavirus Act 2020 (“the Act”). They came into force in England on the 31March 2020 (on the 1st April, in Wales).’

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Landmark Chambers, 16th April 2020

Source: www.landmarkchambers.co.uk

The Coronavirus Act 2020 and Adult Social Care – 4-5 Gray’s Inn Square

‘This note is intended to assist local authorities when considering their Care Act 2014 duties following the Coronavirus Act 2020 (“The Act”) coming into force on 3 March 2020[1]. The Secretary of state issued Guidance on 01 April 2020. The Act contains provision for “easements” of Care Act 2014 duties during the emergency.’

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4-5 Gray's Inn Square, 7th April 2020

Source: www.4-5.co.uk

A Procedural Roadmap for Easement Claims – St Ives Chambers

Posted April 17th, 2020 in chambers articles, easements, news by sally

‘Easement disputes are a staple of real property practice. Some can be of very high value, particularly where the existence of an easement has an impact on a development. Many, however, arise out of neighbour disputes. Despite having a more modest value, these claims are no less important to the parties involved and indeed can be no less complex. As with all neighbour disputes, costs have a tendency to spiral.’

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St Ives Chambers, 8th April 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

Overriding interest trumped by overreaching – Radcliffe Chambers

Posted April 16th, 2020 in chambers articles, easements, mortgages, news, sale of land by sally

‘It was in City of London Building Society v Flegg that the House of Lords notably considered the position of overriding interests and those interests said to overreach them in the context of a mortgage of a property occupied by a third party. The courts had reason to revisit this area of the law much more recently in Baker v Craggs when the owner of the dominant tenement of an easement claimed that his interest overreached the overriding interest of the owner of the servient tenement. Now, in an ex tempore judgment given on the 19th March 2020, Jeremy Hyam QC, sitting as a Recorder in the County Court at Bristol, has adjudicated upon a similar issue in the case of Knight v Fernley in which the unregistered purchaser of a property who had gone into actual occupation of it claimed that her interest overrode that of a later transferee of the very same land.’

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Radcliffe Chambers, 31st March 2020

Source: radcliffechambers.com

Coronavirus (COVID-19)—Changes to the Care Act 2014 – 39 Essex Chambers

‘Siân Davies, barrister at 39 Essex Chambers, discusses the Care Act easements, provided for under the Coronavirus Act 2020. She examines the guidance for local authorities on when it is appropriate to use the Care Act easements, emphasises the information that should be given to those being assessed and debates what changes to safeguarding policies may occur during the relaxation period. She also analyses the relationship between the Care Act easements guidance and the Hospital Discharge Service Requirements.’

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39 Essex Chambers, 7th April 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Articles 3 and 8 in the Time of Coronavirus: A New Case With Implications for Local Authorities Using the Care Act ‘Easements’ – Coronavirus: Guidance for Lawyers and Businesses

‘The Care Act ‘easements’ were brought into force on 31 March 2020. Per the statutory guidance, local authorities may take a decision to apply the new and much higher threshold for receiving care. That threshold states that a person is not entitled to receive care and support from a local authority as a matter of right unless it is necessary to prevent a breach of the person’s human rights – most likely to be Articles 2, 3 or 8 of the European Convention. Arianne Kelly looks at the first case on the subject.’

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Coronavirus: Guidance for Lawyers and Businesses, 14th April 2020

Source: lawinthetimeofcorona.wordpress.com

Government issues guidance on how local authorities can use Care Act ‘easements’ – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Department of Health & Social Care has published guidance setting out local authorities can use the new ‘easements’ under the Coronavirus Act 2020 that mean they no longer need to meet certain duties under the Care Act.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 1st April 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

The rocky route to compensation – No. 5 Chambers

Posted July 3rd, 2019 in arbitration, compensation, easements, news by sally

‘To what extent, if any, can the payment of compensation be avoided in the case of parallel pipelines? Where there is a single pipeline laid across or under another’s land, either under a deed of easement or a lease, then it is common to include provision for the payment of compensation if it prevents the landowner, for example, from extracting mineral. It is also very common for the Mining Code to be incorporated into the deed of easement or lease, as the case may be. There are currently many infrastructure projects being developed across the country, many of which will follow this industry-standard approach to dealing with mineral resources. That approach, however, will need to be considered carefully by landowners in light of the experiences outlined below.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 28th June 2019

Source: www.no5.com

“Being a good sport”. Supreme Court decision – Henderson Chambers

Posted December 12th, 2018 in easements, holidays, news, sport by sally

‘“Being a good sport”: the Supreme Court considers for the first time the extent to which the right to the use of sporting facilities may be conferred by way of easement. (Regency Villas Title Ltd & Ors v Diamond Resorts (Europe) Ltd & Ors [2018] UKSC 57)’

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Henderson Chambers, 15th November 2018

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Supreme Court: grant of recreational rights over land can be easement – OUT-LAW.com

Posted November 16th, 2018 in easements, holidays, news, sport by tracey

‘The right to free use of sporting and recreational facilities provided in a country club environment can be an easement, providing that certain conditions are met, the UK’s highest court has confirmed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 15th November 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Can a parking right be an easement? – Tanfield Chambers

Posted November 23rd, 2017 in easements, news, parking by sally

‘Parking is a hot topic! There have been an extraordinary number of cases involving parking disputes over the last few decades, almost certainly because the absence of a right to park can substantially reduce the value of both commercial and residential land.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 10th November 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Starham v Greene King – Falcon Chambers

‘In 2014, Starham bought a piece of land on the Harrow Road. Most of the land was being used as a beer garden by the Masons Arms pub, owned by Greene King. Starham claimed this use was a trespass. Greene King claimed it was entitled to use the land as a beer garden by virtue of a right created by a conveyance dated 24 August 1855 which it said was an easement or a restrictive covenant.’

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Falcon Chambers, November 2017

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Autumn Newsletter – Falcon Chambers

– Prescriptive easements – a glass half-full: out with the negative; in with the positive 10

– Keeping the Title Clean: Unwanted Notices and Restrictions 12

– Estoppel in Pre-Contractual Negotiations 15

– The Curse of the Freebie 17

– Voidable and no Mistake 20

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Falcon Chambers, November 2017

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Property Litigation Blog: The path from Figsbury Ring to Gore – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted August 22nd, 2017 in easements, news, rights of way by sally

‘Andrew Skelly, of Hardwicke Chambers, considers the courts’ approach to easements, particularly the use of rights of way where the dominant tenement owner acquires additional land.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 14th August 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

‘Bombastic’ pensioners could lose their home after £200,000 legal battle over shared gas meter – Daily Telegraph

Posted July 26th, 2017 in easements, news, utilities by sally

‘In elderly couple described as “troublemaking” and “bombastic” face giving up their home after losing a £200,000 legal fight to prevent neighbours accessing a shared utilities meter.’

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Daily Telegraph, 25th July 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Regency Villas v Diamond Resorts: “Sport is not a matter of ‘mere recreation or amusement’, it’s more important than that.” – Sports Law Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

Posted April 7th, 2017 in easements, news, sport by tracey

‘Anyone looking for a judicial discussion of the importance of sport in modern life might not immediately think of looking in a judgment on the law of easements. But that is what the Court of Appeal has given us in Regency Villas Title Ltd v Diamond Resorts (Europe) Ltd [2017] EWCA Civ 238, which concerns the grant of rights to use various sports and recreational facilities in a leisure complex.’

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Sports Law Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 7th April 2017

Source: www.sportslawbulletin.org

Getting Noticed – Nearly Legal

Posted July 15th, 2016 in easements, landlord & tenant, news, notification, repairs by tracey

‘The case of Edwards v Kumarasamy has now seen a final decision from the Supreme Court with the Court overturning the decision of the Court of Appeal in two key areas.’

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Nearly Legal, 14th July 2016

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Winterburn and another v Bennett and another – WLR Daily

Posted June 8th, 2016 in appeals, easements, law reports, parking, prescription, rights of way, tribunals by sally

Winterburn and another v Bennett and another [2016] EWCA Civ 482

‘The claimant owners of a fish and chip shop claimed as a result of use over a number of years to have acquired by prescription the right for themselves and others using their premises to park on land comprising part of a car park belonging to the defendants. The defendants’ premises, which were next to the car park, had been used as a club and users of those premises used the car park. The entrance to the car park was adjacent to the claimants’ shop. The claimants had operated the shop from about 1987 or 1988 until 2012. Throughout that time, their suppliers had up to nine times a week pulled off the road into the disputed part of the car park and parked there for long enough to make their deliveries, and their customers had parked on the disputed land while they bought their fish and chips. On the whole that use of part of the car park did not interfere with the s’ operations but over a seven-year period there were 12 to 15 occasions on which the defendants asserted ownership of the disputed land, and, expressly or impliedly, asserted that the claimants and their suppliers and customers had no right to park on it. At all times until 2007 there was a sign attached to the wall of the building on one side of the entranceway to the car park, erected on behalf of the defendants, stating “Private car park. For the use of Club patrons only. By order of the Committee”, and a similar sign in the window of the club premises. The claimants claimed that their right to park, acquired by prescription by “lost modern grant”, had been established by their 20 years’ uninterrupted user “as of right”, namely, without force, without secrecy and without permission. The First-tier Tribunal found that, although the two signs were clearly visible, they were insufficient to prevent the claimants from acquiring the claimed parking rights. The Upper Tribunal allowed the defendants’ appeal, reversing that finding.’

WLR Daily, 25th May 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk