When is it unfair to conduct a hearing remotely? A look at Re P (A Child: Remote Hearing) [2020] EWFC 32 – St Philips Chambers

‘In the current climate the court and all parties are having to grapple with the thorny issue of the appropriateness for a family law hearing to proceed remotely; particularly concerning contested issues.’

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St Philips Chambers, 22nd April 2020

Source: st-philips.com

Have you unjustly refused to mediate – 33 Bedford Row

Posted April 22nd, 2020 in chambers articles, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘If a party is a signatory to a pre-existing dispute clause, that will normally be binding upon them save for specific circumstances outside the scope of this article. Our present focus is where disputants are not bound to mediate, but one side proposes mediation.’

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33 Bedford Row, April 2020

Source: www.33bedfordrow.co.uk

ADR – Compromise in COVID-19 Lockdown – Pump Court Chambers

Posted April 21st, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘With the courts shutting their doors to the majority of litigants following the outbreak of Coronavirus, now more than ever parties and their lawyers are turning their minds to alternative dispute resolution (ADR). From virtual mediations to remote ENEs and arbitrations, there are plenty of forms of ADR which can be conducted effectively during this crisis. ADR remains a powerful tool for concluding cases swiftly and at comparatively minimal cost which in this time of economic uncertainty is crucial. In this blog we would look at the different forms of ADR and how to they might continue to operate practically during the lockdown and social distancing measures associated with the pandemic.’

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Pump Court Chambers, 14th April 2020

Source: www.pumpcourtchambers.com

Covid-19 – Delayed appeals: arbitrate or mediate? – 33 Bedford Row

‘Many small to medium sized businesses will, thankfully, rarely be involved in litigation. As a result, they will have little experience of what is to follow once they commence a dispute resolution process regardless of the nature of that process. In many cases, disputes will be addressed via litigation[1]. In many instances the perceived wrong done by the other side will drive the dispute forward. It is only perhaps when some of the initial expectation of a quick positive trial outcome fades, whilst the pre-trial process winds on, that parties will wonder ‘should this have gone on for so long’ and/or ‘was there a quicker way to do this?’ Nevertheless, once litigation is commenced it takes on an energy of its own and many parties are able to see the case through to an initial judgment. Matters may thereafter get more complex as (further) fatigue potentially sets in.’

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33 Bedford Row, 10th April 2020

Source: www.33bedfordrow.co.uk

Family Law Arbitration: Is it for me? – Pump Court Chambers

Posted April 20th, 2020 in arbitration, chambers articles, dispute resolution, families, news by sally

‘On 22nd February 2012 a new method of alternative dispute resolution was launched to assist parties to resolve their family problems: arbitration. Arbitration in Family Law developed at around the time when the scope of legal aid was being restricted as a result of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 and the Regulations made pursuant to that Act.’

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Pump Court Chambers, 8th April 2020

Source: www.pumpcourtchambers.com

High Court judges order indemnity costs over ADR failures – Litigation Futures

‘The courts are getting harder on parties who fail to follow directions to try alternative dispute resolution (ADR), with judges imposing indemnity costs in two cases in recent weeks.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th April 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Present & Post Covid-19 Rent Review disputes & ADR – 33 Bedford Row

‘At the best of times there are disputes between commercial landlords and retailers in England and Wales. Over the last month the effect of the Covid 19 public health crisis has laid waste to the high street. Most shops cannot now open, and the ones that can must implement stringent social distancing measures. All pubs, restaurants, cinemas and so on are closed. Where there is no footfall there is no spending by customers and no income generated to pay rent. No one at the time of writing knows exactly when this position will change. The present scenario presents an unattractive vista for commercial landlords. Nothing operates in a vacuum; the rent these landlords were expecting will be income for investors who may own a small retail building and have no other source of income. Large pension funds, who often invest in the high street, will continue to have the normal financial obligations to the members of their fund. Some landlords will be reliant on their commercial rental income to service a loan secured on the building they rent out.’

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33 Bedford Row, 9th April 2020

Source: www.33bedfordrow.co.uk

ADR – Compromise in COVID-19 Lockdown – Pump Court Chambers

Posted April 17th, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘With the courts shutting their doors to the majority of litigants following the outbreak of Coronavirus, now more than ever parties and their lawyers are turning their minds to alternative dispute resolution (ADR). From virtual mediations to remote ENEs and arbitrations, there are plenty of forms of ADR which can be conducted effectively during this crisis. ADR remains a powerful tool for concluding cases swiftly and at comparatively minimal cost which in this time of economic uncertainty is crucial. In this blog we would look at the different forms of ADR and how to they might continue to operate practically during the lockdown and social distancing measures associated with the pandemic.’

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Pump Court Chambers, 14th April 2020

Source: www.pumpcourtchambers.com

COVID-19 impact on the UK Economy & ADR – 33 Bedford Row

Posted April 16th, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘In these unprecedented times, we are already seeing companies collapsing, Flybe ceased operating at the start of March stating that COVID-19 was the final nail in the coffin. Widespread media coverage in early April states that Debenham faces administration and clothing giant Arcadia is preparing to close a huge number of stores as the effect of the lockdown tears through the high street. The global pandemic could lead to a great depression and the adverse economic effects seem almost certain to outweigh the impact of the 2008/2009 world-wide recession. We will look at how COVID-19 may impact the UK economy in the coming months and how ADR may be used in order to address business disputes in an expeditious and cost-effective manner.’

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33 Bedford Row, 6th April 2020

Source: www.33bedfordrow.co.uk

Courting peril: the lessons in Ohpen Operations UK Ltd v Invesco Fund Managers Ltd – Falcon Chambers

Posted April 16th, 2020 in chambers articles, contracts, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘The recent judgment of Mrs Justice O’Farrell in Ohpen Operations UK Ltd v Invesco Fund Managers Ltd [2019] EWHC 2246 (TCC) provided a boost for anyone entering a contract who would prefer to utilise a pre-agreed dispute resolution process in the event of a future contractual disagreement. Specifically, the case provides valuable guidance on the court’s approach if asked to enforce a contractual dispute resolution clause providing for alternative dispute resolution (ADR).’

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Falcon Chambers, April 2020

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Mediation – a way forward? – Becket Chambers

Posted March 23rd, 2020 in chambers articles, civil justice, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘Why, you may be wondering, would a barrister with 28 years’ experience of civil litigation and the adversarial process want to talk about mediation? Surely the whole purpose of barristers, and indeed lawyers, is to let people have their day in court and to demolish the “other side”?’

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Becket Chambers, 2nd March 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

Workplace law – BBC Law in Action

Posted March 20th, 2020 in dispute resolution, employment, employment tribunals, news by sally

‘How good are employment tribunals at resolving disputes between employers and staff? Joshua Rozenberg has been finding out.’

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BBC Law in Action, 17th March 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

The role of judicial review applications in the CIL regime – Local Government Lawyer

Posted March 6th, 2020 in appeals, dispute resolution, judicial review, local government, news, planning by tracey

‘A recent decision of Mr Justice Swift in the Planning Court will have a significant impact on the manner in which a Community Infrastructure Levy (“CIL”) is challenged and the stance taken by authorities in rebutting such challenges, writes Christopher Cant.’

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Local Government Lawyer , 6th March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

MoJ: Three months is enough to prepare for whiplash reforms – Legal Futures

‘Three months should be enough time for personal injury law firms and defendant insurers to be ready for the whiplash reforms, the government official leading the work said yesterday.’

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Legal Futures, 3rd March 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Mediation: untangling knotty problems – Counsel

Posted February 21st, 2020 in barristers, civil justice, codes of practice, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘What’s the most voiced complaint about litigators, the Bar in particular, going into mediation? Some best practice points emerged from the recent Civil Mediation Council Conference – writes Rawdon Crozier.’

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Counsel, February 2020

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

Mostyn J. and ‘amicable’ divorces – St Ives Chambers

‘amicable (spelt with a little ‘a’) charged the parties £300 for helping with preparation of their divorce petition and application for decree nisi, and a further £300 for drafting a simple precedent-compliant cleanbreak order (which the parties had negotiated) together with accompanying Form A, D81, joint disclosure statement. Their letter forwarding the same to the court attracted the attention of the court and this application.’

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St Ives Chambers, February 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

Court of Appeal adopts dominant purpose test – Henderson Chambers

‘Copying in your lawyer or having them at a meeting, does not necessarily mean that legal advice privilege will apply – in a law-changing judgment, the Court of Appeal has adopted the dominant purpose test in relation to Legal Advice Privilege.’

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Henderson Chambers, 30th January 2020

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Appeal court confirms ‘dominant purpose’ test for legal advice privilege – OUT-LAW.com

‘The UK’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) could not claim legal advice privilege over email correspondence which was predominantly conducted for the purposes of seeking commercial views, rather than legal advice, the Court of Appeal has confirmed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th February 2020

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Legal advice must be “dominant purpose” for privilege to apply – Legal Futures

‘Legal advice privilege (LAP) only applies where documents were created with the “dominant purpose” of seeking or providing legal advice, appeal judges have ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 29th January 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The case for judicial early neutral evaluation – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted January 27th, 2020 in case management, civil procedure rules, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘Perhaps an overlooked provision of the CPR is rule 3.1(2)(m) which provides that the court may ‘take any other step or make any other order for the purpose of managing the case and furthering the overriding objective, including hearing an early neutral evaluation with the aim of helping the parties settle the case’.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 27th January 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk