Closed Material – London Review of Books

‘Nicholas Phillips on the problems posed by the use of secret evidence.’

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London Review of Books, 17th April 2014

Source: www.lrb.co.uk

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David Miranda challenge dismissed in High Court – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The High Court has rejected all the arguments supporting David Miranda’s application for judicial review of his detention at Heathrow Airport in August last year. In a highly readable and pungent judgment, Laws LJ has some robust things to say about the vaunting of journalistic interests over public security in the guise of Article 10, and the “mission creep” of requirements demanded by the courts for state action to be considered “proportionate”.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 19th February 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Incendiary Devices: The Snowden Files – The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man – London Review of Books

Posted February 13th, 2014 in intelligence services, internet, news, whistleblowers by sally

‘What matters more: the leaker, or the leak? Any one of the following, you’d think, might have been the news story of the year, or the decade: the revelation that America’s biggest spy agency, the NSA, has information on every phone call made in the continental United States as well as abroad; that it claims to have direct access to the servers of Google, Yahoo, Facebook and all the other major web companies; that GCHQ, the NSA’s British equivalent, is siphoning off the entire internet and storing some of it for thirty days; that online encryption has been subverted and nothing is safe from government spies. The drift of the stories – which were at their peak last summer, when the Guardian and others first got their hands on Edward Snowden’s documents – was that we’re all being watched all the time. Anything we do online, and any phone call we make, is potentially being analysed by the NSA and its friends. But, as Luke Harding discloses in his book on the Snowden affair, the most viewed story in the Guardian’s history wasn’t any of this: it wasn’t a piece of news at all. It was the 12-minute video, made by Laura Poitras and Glenn Greenwald, in which Snowden explained who he was and why he’d decided to reveal what he had.’

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London Review of Books, February 2014

Source: www.lrb.co.uk

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Barristers tell Parliament that some GCHQ mass surveillance is illegal – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Two barristers have advised a Parliamentary committee that some mass surveillance allegedly undertaken by the UK’s security services is probably illegal. Jemima Stratford QC and Tim Johnston’s advice (PDF) was commissioned by the chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Drones.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 29th January 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Regina (Noor Khan) v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs – WLR Daily

Regina (Noor Khan) v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [2014] EWCA Civ 24; [2013] WLR (D) 14

‘The English court would not adjudicate, either as a question of justiciability or as a matter of discretion, on a claim which sought to characterise the actions of United Kingdom officials passing on locational intelligence to officials of the United States of America for use in drone strikes as secondary criminal offences either under domestic criminal law or international humanitarian law, because such relief would necessarily entail a condemnation of the activities of a foreign sovereign state.’

WLR Daily, 20th January 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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CoA blocks CIA drones challenge – The Lawyer

Posted January 21st, 2014 in appeals, crime, intelligence services, murder, news, weapons by sally

‘The Court of Appeal (CoA) has thrown out a claim challenging the legality of British involvement in US drone strikes because any judgment would be a condemnation of US foreign policy.’

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The Lawyer, 21st January 2014

Source: www.thelawyer.com

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Home Office has ‘tailored plans’ for terror suspects as controls expire – The Guardian

‘Police and MI5 will put “tailored plans” in place to manage the risks posed by terror suspects when existing supervision measures expire later this month, the Home Office has insisted.’

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The Guardian, 18th January 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK ‘was inappropriately involved in rendition’ – BBC News

Posted December 19th, 2013 in inquiries, intelligence services, news, rendition, reports, select committees, terrorism by tracey

‘There is evidence Britain was inappropriately involved in the rendition and ill-treatment of terror suspects, an inquiry has revealed.’

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BBC News, 19th December 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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UK inquiry on rendition and torture to be handed to ISC – The Guardian

Posted December 19th, 2013 in inquiries, intelligence services, news, rendition, select committees, torture by tracey

‘The stalled official inquiry into the UK’s involvement in rendition and torture in the years after 9/11 is to be handed to the controversial intelligence and security committee (ISC), the government will announce on Thursday.’

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The Guardian, 18th December 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Mass Surveillance and Freedom of the Press: A Conversation with Glenn Greenwald – UCL

‘Last June, Glenn Greenwald broke the story of the mass surveillance government programs disclosed in the leaks by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. In August Mr. Greenwald’s partner, David Miranda, was detained by police at Heathrow Airport for 9 hours under schedule 7 to the Terrorism Act 2000. Mr. Greenwald has continued to release and comment on similar leaks since then and recently announced his departure from the Guardian to launch a new journalism venture with eBay co-founder Pierre Omidyar.

Our moderator led a conversation with Mr. Greenwald via Skype on the range of legal and political questions raised by his recent efforts. These include the lack of safeguards on government surveillance programs, the individual’s right to privacy, the freedom of the press to publish such information and any alleged threats these exposures pose to national security.’

Video

UCL, November 2013

Source: www.ucl.ac.uk

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National Security trumps disclosure of Litvinenko secret documents, rules High Court – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs v Assistant Deputy Coroner for Inner North London [2013] EWHC 3724 (Admin). The Foreign Secretary successfully appealed against an order for disclosure of secret documents to the Inquest for the death of former KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 5th December 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Litvinenko, courts and secrecy – BBC News

‘The government has successfully won a court order blocking the release of secret information in relation to the death of the former KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko. Alexander Litvinenko fell ill after a meeting with former KGB contacts in London in 2006. It is the latest legal twist in what is becoming an ever-more complicated legal fight between his widow, the proposed coroner and ministers over what should or should not be made public about the nature of his death.’

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BBC News, 27th November 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Alexander Litvinenko inquest: high court halts lifting of secrecy order – The Guardian

Posted November 27th, 2013 in closed material, coroners, disclosure, inquests, intelligence services, murder, news, Russia by tracey

‘The government has won a high court order to prevent the partial lifting of a secrecy order affecting the proposed inquest into the death of former KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko.’

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The Guardian, 27th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Watchdog demands GCHQ report on NSA’s UK data storage – The Guardian

‘The watchdog tasked with scrutinising the work of Britain’s intelligence agencies is to demand an urgent report from GCHQ about revelations that the phone, internet and email records of British citizens have been analysed and stored by America’s National Security Agency.’

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The Guardian, 21st November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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CF v Security Service and others; Mohamed v Foreign and Commonwealth Office and others – WLR Daily

CF v Security Service and others; Mohamed v Foreign and Commonwealth Office and others [2013] EWHC 3402 (QB); [2013] WLR (D) 439

“A court could make a declaration under section 6 of the Justice and Security Act 2013 permitting a closed material application to be made to the court before a public interest immunity claim had been made or determined.”

WLR Daily, 7th November 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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The real question about the terror suspect who fled in a burqa: did MI5 bring him here illegally? – The Guardian

Posted November 14th, 2013 in fugitive offenders, intelligence services, news, rendition, torture by tracey

“Mohammed Ahmed Mohamed’s escape was an embarrassment. The alleged torture and rendition that came before it might just be a major scandal.”

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The Guardian, 13th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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MI6 spy found dead in bag probably locked himself inside, Met says – The Guardian

Posted November 13th, 2013 in accidents, inquests, intelligence services, news by tracey

“The MI6 spy found dead in a bag three years ago probably locked himself in the holdall and died as a result of a tragic accident, Scotland Yard has said.”

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The Guardian, 13th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK objects to attempt by Council of Europe to examine online spying – The Guardian

“Britain is delaying the publication of a declaration on internet freedom by the 47 members of Europe’s human rights watchdog after objecting to a probe into the gathering of ‘vast amounts of electronic data’ by intelligence agencies.”

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The Guardian, 8th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK spy chiefs to face MPs over mass surveillance – The Guardian

Posted November 7th, 2013 in intelligence services, investigatory powers, news, select committees by tracey

“The three heads of the British intelligence agencies are to make an unprecedented public televised appearance in front of the intelligence and security committee of MPs where they will seek to justify the scale of their surveillance activities.”

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The Guardian, 7th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Investigatory Powers Tribunal – BBC Law in Action

“Law in Action speaks exclusively to Mr Justice Burton, president of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal – a judicial body, independent of the government, which considers complaints brought against the intelligence services, the police, military and local authorities. It specifically investigates whether surveillance has been conducted in a lawful manner.”

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BBC Law in Action, 5th November 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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