Browning v Information Commissioner and Another – WLR Daily

Browning v Information Commissioner and Another [2014] EWCA Civ 1050;  [2014] WLR (D) 346

‘The First-tier Tribunal (General Regulatory Chamber) Rules 2009 permitted the tribunal when hearing an appeal against a decision of the Information Commissioner to adopt a closed material procedure in which a party and his legal representatives were excluded from the hearing or part of it.’

WLR Daily, 30th July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Greenwich Inc Ltd (in administration) v Dowling and others; Greenwich Inc Trading Ltd v Dowling and others – WLR Daily

Greenwich Inc Ltd (in administration) v Dowling and others; Greenwich Inc Trading Ltd v Dowling and others: [2014] EWHC 2451 (Ch); [2014] WLR (D) 334

‘If a consent order affected orders made by a judge it was advisable at first instance that any applications in respect of such an order should be made to a judge rather than a master. The court retained a general discretion whether before or after the parties had seen a draft judgment to continue to deliver a judgment where it was appropriate so to do. Even if the parties had effectively put an end to the dispute between themselves, that in itself could not stop the court from raising matters which concerned it.’

WLR Daily, 15th July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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In re D (Children) (CAFCASS: Safeguarding Checks) – WLR Daily

In re D (Children) (CAFCASS: Safeguarding Checks); [2014] EWHC 2376 (Fam); [2014] WLR (D) 312

‘Whether, in private family law proceedings, safeguarding inquiries should be conducted about third parties, such as partners, would depend on the precise circumstances of the various relationships. In practice, it would be expected that co-operation for such inquiries would generally be sought in respect of partners of the parties and if such a partner did not give his or her consent, an application to the court would usually be made by CAFCASS in its discretion.’

WLR Daily, 20th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

 

 

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Record number of data complaints made to ICO – BBC News

Posted July 16th, 2014 in appeals, complaints, data protection, disclosure, fines, news, nuisance, privacy, statistics by tracey

‘The UK’s information commissioner has called for better funding for the country’s data regulator amid a record number of cases.’

Full story

BBC News, 15th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Data sharing rules must be reformed – Law Commission

Posted July 14th, 2014 in data protection, disclosure, Law Commission, news, privacy by sally

‘The law that governs how public bodies share data must be modernised, simplified and clarified, according to the Law Commission. Law reform will help to create a principled and clear legal structure for protecting individual privacy and for the data sharing required by today’s public bodies and the people they serve.’

Full story

Law Commission, 11th July 2014

Source: www.lawcommission.justice.gov.uk

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High Court sets out new procedure to help families of asbestos victims access employment records – Litigation Futures

‘The High Court has set out a new procedure to help the families of workers who died from asbestos-related diseases trace their employment histories.’

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Litigation Futures, 11th July 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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High Court rules that identity of client is covered by privilege – Legal Futures

Posted July 11th, 2014 in anonymity, confidentiality, disclosure, internet, law firms, news, privilege by sally

‘The High Court has rejected a bid to force a law firm to disclose the identity of a former client who revealed confidential information in an anonymous blog.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 11th July 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Appeal judges to hear BSB “misleading conduct” case – Legal Futures

‘The Court of Appeal is to hear a disciplinary case which led to the Bar Standards Board being accused by Lord Justice Moses of “misleading conduct”.’

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Legal Futures, 10th July 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Met must respond to spy allegations in undercover police case, court rules – The Guardian

‘The Metropolitan police cannot use its policy of “neither confirm nor deny” in response to damages claims brought by women who claim they were tricked into forming relationships with undercover officers.’

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The Guardian, 2nd July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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You cannot be serious! Peers call ‘out’ on Government’s judicial review reforms – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Last night saw the House of Lords’ first reaction to the Government’s proposed changes to judicial review as the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill had its second reading. Already dissected at some length in this blog, the proposals have been roundly criticised by both the senior judiciary and the Joint Committee on Human Rights. Consultations responses, including from JUSTICE, expressed concern that the measures appear, by design or coincidence, to undermine the rule of law, inhibit transparency and shield the Government from judicial scrutiny. Two key concerns arise from the Government proposals: restricting access for individuals without substantial means and limiting the courts’ discretion to do justice in the public interest. Yesterday’s debate was robust and eloquent, with former Law Lords joined by bishops and backbenchers alike to condemn the new measures.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 1st July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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In re B (A Child) (Wrongful Removal: Order to Secure Return of Child) – WLR Daily

In re B (A Child) (Wrongful Removal: Order to Secure Return of Child): [2014] EWCA Civ 843; [2014] WLR (D) 283

‘Although there was no doubt that there were circumstances in which the High Court, in exercise of its inherent jurisdiction, could properly make an order requiring someone to lodge their passport with the court or with some suitable custodian it was not permissible to make such an order to compel a third party without parental responsibility, or any other form of power or control over the child, to take steps to secure the return of an abducted child. Furthermore, where the subject of the order was not yet 17 it was simply wrong as a matter of principle to attach a penal notice to the order since a child could not be imprisoned or detained for contempt.’

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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UK Supreme Court: forcing disclosure of minor or spent convictions not “necessary or proportionate” – OUT-LAW.com

‘Requiring applicants for those jobs which require enhanced criminal record checks to disclose all spent convictions no matter how historic or minor is an unnecessary and disproportionate interference with their human rights, the UK’s Supreme Court has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 25th June 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Regina (T) v Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police and others (Liberty and others intervening); Regina (B) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Same intervening) – WLR Daily

Regina (T) v Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police and others (Liberty and others intervening); Regina (B) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Same intervening) [2014] UKSC 35; [2014] WLR (D) 271

‘The provisions in Part V of the Police Act for the automatic release of a person’s convictions, cautions and warnings— regardless of their relevance or the length of time that had elapsed— when that person was required, by reason of articles 3 or 4 of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975, to obtain and disclose an enhanced criminal record certificate for the purpose of obtaining employment or some other position which involved working with children or other vulnerable groups of persons, did not meet the requirement of legality for the purposes of article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and so was incompatible with the person’s right to respect for their private life guaranteed by that article. Moreover, the provisions contravened article 8 in that they were not “necessary in a democratic society”, as required by article 8.2.’

WLR Daily, 18th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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High Court: provision of reference containing details of uncompleted disciplinary action was “unfair” use of personal data – OUT-LAW.com

‘Whether it is “fair” to share an individual’s personal data for lawful public policy reasons requires a careful balancing of the interests of that individual and the interests of others, including the public interests, the High Court in England has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 23rd June 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Regina (Nunn) v Chief Constable of Suffolk Constabulary – WLR Daily

Posted June 20th, 2014 in appeals, disclosure, evidence, forensic science, law reports, murder, Supreme Court by tracey

Regina (Nunn) v Chief Constable of Suffolk Constabulary: [2014] UKSC 37; [2014] WLR (D) 265

‘Where, after a defendant’s trial had ended in his conviction, material came to light which might cast doubt on the safety of the conviction, the prosecutors’ duty of disclosure required him to disclose that material to the defendant, unless there were good reason not to do so, and, where there was a real prospect that further inquiry might reveal such material, to make that inquiry. There was, however, no indefinitely continuing duty on police or prosecutors to respond to whatever inquiries the defendant might make for access to case materials to allow re-investigation.’

WLR Daily, 18th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Old and minor convictions and cautions need not be disclosed – Supreme Court – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously declared that government rules regarding the disclosure of spent convictions are unlawful and incompatible with Article 8 of the Convention.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 18th June 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Open justice and freedom of information – Browning in the Court of Appeal – Panopticon

‘The issue of just how open our justice system should be is an issue which is or should be of fundamental concern to all practising lawyers. If, as Jeremy Bentham once stated ‘publicity is the very soul of justice’ (cited by Lord Shaw in the leading case of Scott v Scott [1913] AC 477), then an open justice system is the corporeal expression of that soul. However, we now live in times where open justice is increasingly under threat. Indeed, as last week’s headlines reminded us all, matters have now got to a stage where some judges at least have been prepared to allow, not merely the deployment of a limited closed procedure to deal with certain aspects of a case, but a completely secret trial. It no doubt came as a relief to many that the Court of Appeal was not prepared to sanction such a comprehensive departure from the open justice principle: Guardian News v AB CD. However, the mere fact that the judiciary was prepared to contemplate such a procedure shows how far we have come since the days of Scott v Scott.’

Full story

Panopticon, 18th June 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Supreme Court rejects Kevin Nunn’s evidence release plea – BBC News

Posted June 18th, 2014 in appeals, disclosure, evidence, forensic science, murder, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘A man serving life in prison for murdering his ex-girlfriend has lost his fight to have forensic exhibits retested.’

Full story

BBC News, 18th June 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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R (on the application of Nunn) (Appellant) v Chief Constable of Suffolk Constabulary and another (Respondents) – Supreme Court

R (on the application of Nunn) (Appellant) v Chief Constable of Suffolk Constabulary and another (Respondents) [2014] UKSC 37 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 18th June 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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R (on the application of T and another) (Respondents) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Appellants) – Supreme Court

R (on the application of T and another) (Respondents) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Appellants) [2014] UKSC 35 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 18th June 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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