Versloot Dredging BV and another v HDI Gerling Industrie Versicherung AG – WLR Daily

Posted October 22nd, 2014 in appeals, fraud, insurance, law reports, proportionality by sally

Versloot Dredging BV and another v HDI Gerling Industrie Versicherung AG [2014] EWCA Civ 1349; [2014] WLR (D) 433

‘The rule that a fraudulent insurance claim deprived the insured of any right to recover anything applied also to fraudulent devices, namely, the making of statements which were known by the insured to be untrue or which were made recklessly, not caring whether they were true or false, in support of a claim honestly believed by him to be good both as to liability and amount.’

WLR Daily, 16th October 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Strack v European Commission – WLR Daily

Posted October 7th, 2014 in documents, EC law, freedom of information, law reports, proportionality by sally

Strack v European Commission (Case C‑127/13 P) ECLI:EU:C:2014:2250; [2014] WLR (D) 40

‘An institution of the European Union could, in exceptional circumstances, refuse access to certain documents on the ground that the workload relating to their disclosure would be disproportionate as compared to the objectives set by the application for access to those documents. However, reliance on the principle of proportionality could not allow the time-limits laid down by Parliament and Council Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 of 30 May 2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission documents (OJ 2001 L145, p 43) to be changed without creating a situation of legal uncertainty.’

WLR Daily, 2nd October 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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European Convention on Human Rights: What has it ever done for us? – The Independent

‘As the Tories attempt to dilute the treaty’s authority in the UK, James Cusick takes a look at the difference it has made.’

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The Independent, 3rd October 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Judges at odds over relationship between budgeting and indemnity costs – Litigation Futures

Posted September 1st, 2014 in budgets, costs, indemnities, judges, news, pilot schemes, proportionality by sally

The High Court is at odds over the relationship between budgeting and indemnity costs, after one judge expressly disagreed with the view of another that the costs management order (CMO) should also be the starting point for an assessment of indemnity costs.

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Litigation Futures, 1st September 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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In re P (A Child) (Adoption: Step-Parent’s Application) – WLR Daily

Posted August 22nd, 2014 in adoption, children, consent, human rights, law reports, proportionality by tracey

In re P (A Child) (Adoption: Step-Parent’s Application); [2014] EWCA Civ 1174; [2014] WLR (D) 381

‘In an adoption application, the key to the approach both to evaluating the needs of a child’s welfare throughout his or her life and to dispensing with parental consent was proportionality. Although the same statutory provisions in respect of welfare and consent, namely sections 1 and 52 of the Adoption and Children Act 2002, applied to an application to adopt by a step-parent, a distinction was to be drawn between adoption in the context of compulsory and permanent placement outside the family against the wishes of the child’s parents, and a step-parent adoption where the child was remaining in the care of one or other of his parents.’

WLR Daily, 15th August 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Supreme Court agrees to hear case on eviction and disability discrimination – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Supreme Court has issued a last-minute order to prevent the eviction of a disabled social housing tenant.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 6th August 2014

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

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DRIP – Data Retention Regulations come into force – Panopticon

‘The introduction of the controversial draft Data Retention Regulations 2014 has already been discussed by my colleague Robin Hopkins in his excellent post last month. The Regulations now have the force of law, having come into force on 31 July 2014 – see the Regulations here. In his post, Robin made the point that, following the judgment in Digital Rights Ireland, there were two methods for curtailing the infringement of privacy rights presupposed by the existing communications data retention (CDR) regime: either cut back on the data retention requirements provided for under the legislation, so as generally to limit the potential for interference with privacy rights, or introduce more robust safeguards with a view to ensuring that any interference with privacy rights is proportionate and otherwise justified. The Government, which has evidently opted for the latter approach in the new Regulations, will now need to persuade a somewhat sceptical public that the safeguards which have been adopted in the legislation strike the right balance as between the protection of privacy rights on the one hand and the imperative to support criminal law enforcement functions on the other.’

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Panopticon, 5th August 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Arguably Serious – Aster Communities Ltd v Akerman-Livingstone – NearlyLegal

‘Aster Communities Ltd (formerly Flourish homes Ltd) v Akerman-Livingstone [2014] EWCA Civ 1081 (30 July 2014) is an extraordinary decision that will – if allowed to stand – have a significant impact on the day-to-day management of possession claims in the county court.’

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NearlyLegal, 5th August 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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No appeal over Rolf Harris sex offences sentence – BBC News

‘Rolf Harris’s sex offences sentence will not be referred to the Court of Appeal, despite 150 complaints over its “leniency”, the attorney general’s office has said.’

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BBC News, 30th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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McDonald and others v McDonald – WLR Daily

Posted July 25th, 2014 in housing, human rights, law reports, mortgages, proportionality, repossession by tracey

McDonald and others v McDonald: [2014] EWCA Civ 1049; [2014] WLR (D) 336

‘Where a private landlord sought a possession order under section 21(4) of the Housing Act 1988 the tenant could not resist the making of the order on the ground that it would be disproportionate under article 8.2 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.’

WLR Daily, 24th July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Minimum income rules for immigrants do not breach human rights – Appeal Court – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Provisions in the Immigration Rules which impose income requirements on individuals living in the United Kingdom, who wish to bring their non-European Economic Area citizen spouses to live with them, are not a disproportionate interference with their right to family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The Court of Appeal has also underlined the important (but often misunderstood) point that there is no legal requirement that the Immigration Rules should provide that the best interests of the child should be determinative. Section 55 of the Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009 is not a “trump card” to be played whenever the interests of a child arise. ‘

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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In re D (Children) (CAFCASS: Safeguarding Checks) – WLR Daily

In re D (Children) (CAFCASS: Safeguarding Checks); [2014] EWHC 2376 (Fam); [2014] WLR (D) 312

‘Whether, in private family law proceedings, safeguarding inquiries should be conducted about third parties, such as partners, would depend on the precise circumstances of the various relationships. In practice, it would be expected that co-operation for such inquiries would generally be sought in respect of partners of the parties and if such a partner did not give his or her consent, an application to the court would usually be made by CAFCASS in its discretion.’

WLR Daily, 20th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

 

 

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Regina (MM (Lebanon)) v Secretary of State for the Home Department; Regina (Majid) v Same; Regina (Javed) v Same – WLR Daily

Posted July 15th, 2014 in appeals, families, human rights, immigration, law reports, proportionality by tracey

Regina (MM (Lebanon)) v Secretary of State for the Home Department; Regina (Majid) v Same; Regina (Javed) v Same; [2014] EWCA Civ 985; [2014] WLR (D) 308

‘When applied to either recognised refugees or British citizens, Appendix FM of the Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules (HC 395), as inserted, which prevented entry clearance being granted to a party to a marriage where the income of the sponsor did meet the minimum threshold, was not a disproportionate interference with the right to respect for family life under article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.’

WLR Daily 11th July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Mitchell: conjoined appeals – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Practitioners will be conscious of the ridiculous practice that ensued in the lower courts following the ‘guidance’ dispensed by the Court of Appeal in Mitchell v News Group Newspapers [2013] EWCA Civ 1537 as to the operation and application of rule 3.9 of the Civil Procedure Rules – Relief from Sanction.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 14th July 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Expert welcomes Court of Appeal’s “more nuanced approach” to granting relief from ‘Mitchell’ sanctions – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 8th, 2014 in appeals, civil procedure rules, courts, news, proportionality, sanctions by tracey

‘Courts should be much more ready to grant relief from sanctions for failure to comply with court orders, practice directions and rules after the Court of Appeal found that the current approach had been “misunderstood and is being misapplied by some courts”, an expert has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th July 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Court of Appeal takes some of the blame for “misunderstood and misapplied” Mitchell ruling – Litigation Futures

‘The Mitchell ruling has been “misunderstood and is being misapplied by some courts”, the Master of the Rolls said today in issuing more detailed guidance on how it should be used – while also recognising that some of the language used in Mitchell may have contributed to the problems.’

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Litigation Futures, 4th July 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Court of Appeal sets out 3-stage test for applications for relief from sanctions – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Court of Appeal’s ruling today [4 July] in three linked appeals relating to its its earlier judgment in Mitchell will make civil litigation less adversarial and more co-operative, the Law Society has predicted.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 4th July 2014

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

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Mitchell-Game, Set and Match? – NearlyLegal

‘The eagerly awaited Court of Appeal judgement in Denton & others v TH White Ltd & others was handed down on Friday. Dyson LJ provides a careful methodology on the approach to applications for relief from sanctions under CPR 3.9, with the aim to set to rights the fall-out from the landmark decision of Mitchell v News Group Newspapers Ltd’

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NearlyLegal, 6th July 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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In re B (A Child) (Wrongful Removal: Order to Secure Return of Child) – WLR Daily

In re B (A Child) (Wrongful Removal: Order to Secure Return of Child): [2014] EWCA Civ 843; [2014] WLR (D) 283

‘Although there was no doubt that there were circumstances in which the High Court, in exercise of its inherent jurisdiction, could properly make an order requiring someone to lodge their passport with the court or with some suitable custodian it was not permissible to make such an order to compel a third party without parental responsibility, or any other form of power or control over the child, to take steps to secure the return of an abducted child. Furthermore, where the subject of the order was not yet 17 it was simply wrong as a matter of principle to attach a penal notice to the order since a child could not be imprisoned or detained for contempt.’

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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UK Supreme Court: forcing disclosure of minor or spent convictions not “necessary or proportionate” – OUT-LAW.com

‘Requiring applicants for those jobs which require enhanced criminal record checks to disclose all spent convictions no matter how historic or minor is an unnecessary and disproportionate interference with their human rights, the UK’s Supreme Court has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 25th June 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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