Councils could be owed “hundreds of millions of pounds” in business rates following Supreme Court ruling – Local Government Lawyer

Posted May 19th, 2021 in appeals, leases, local government, news, rates, statutory interpretation by sally

‘Local authorities could be in line for hundreds of millions of pounds in business rates following last week’s landmark Supreme Court ruling, the solicitor who acted for the appellant councils has claimed.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 17th May 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

New Judgment: Commissioners for Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs v Tooth [2021] UKSC 17 – UKSC Blog

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed this appeal concerning issues surrounding the Taxes Management Act 1970.’

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UKSC Blog, 14th May 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

New Judgment: R (on the application of Fylde Coast Farms Ltd (formerly Oyston Estates Ltd)) v Fylde Borough Council [2021] UKSC 18 – UKSC Blog

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed this appeal concerning the interpretation of section 61N of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990.’

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UKSC Blog, 14th May 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

Council wins Supreme Court appeal over claim of £1.2m from heirs of school benefactor – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Supreme Court has allowed Oxfordshire County Council’s appeal in a case in which a family said the sale of school land worth £1.2m, which was gifted to the council by their late family member, was unlawful.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 23rd April 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Florence Powell and Stephanie Needleman: How radical an instrument is Section 3 of the Human Rights Act 1998? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The operation of the Human Rights Act 1998 (the “HRA”) is currently being reviewed by the Government’s Independent Human Rights Act Review (the “Review”). One of the Review’s key themes is “the impact of the HRA on the relationship between the judiciary, the executive and the legislature”. In respect of this theme, the Terms of Reference ask how s.3 has operated and whether it should be amended or repealed.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 24th March 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Litigation funding agreements are not DBAs, Court of Appeal judges confirm – Litigation Futures

‘Agreements with third-party litigation funders are not damages-based agreements (DBAs), three Court of Appeal judges – albeit sitting in the Divisional Court – have decided.’

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Litigation Futures, 8th March 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

“You have reached your destination…”; Uber v. Aslam – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘On 19 February 2021 the Supreme Court delivered its judgment in the long running dispute between Uber and its drivers.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 26th February 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Section 119 Highways Act 1980 – criteria for the diversion of a footpath, bridleway or restricted byway – Pallant Chambers

Posted March 5th, 2021 in appeals, chambers articles, news, planning, roads, statutory interpretation by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has upheld the High Court’s decision in the case of The Open Spaces Society v Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs [2020] EWHC 1085 Admin (05 May 2020) as to the correct criteria to be applied when considering applications to divert a footpath, bridleway or restricted byway under section 119 of the Highways Act 1980. The judgment confirms that in carrying out the test of expediency under section 119(6) of the Act, the decision making is not confined to determining the matter solely on the basis of the criteria under section 119(6)(a),(b), and (c). Provided that those criteria are specifically considered, then the decision maker can take account of a broad range of matters in reaching a conclusion, even if those matters have already been considered under other requirements of section 119 of the Act.’

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Pallant Chambers, 26th February 2021

Source: www.pallantchambers.co.uk

Supreme Court to hear appeal next week over timing of judicial review challenges to neighbourhood development orders – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Supreme Court will next week consider whether section 61N of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, which deals with legal challenges to neighbourhood development orders, should be interpreted to mean that the appellant’s application for judicial review was made out of time.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 2nd March 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

The pitfalls of relying on s21 during the pandemic – St Ives Chambers

‘Master Dagnall gave judgment in the case of Corp of Trinity House of Deptford Strond v (1) Dequincy Prescott (2) Clodagh Byrne on 11 February 2021 [2021] EWHC 283 (QB) which considered several issues regarding the pandemic and possession proceedings which are worthy of note as the stay on evictions has again been extended.’

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St Ives Chambers, February 2021

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

Does judicial review of delegated legislation under the Human Rights Act 1998 unduly interfere with executive law-making?- UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The relationship between delegated legislation and the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA) is seemingly becoming a more contentious constitutional issue. Professor Richard Ekins published, as part of the Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project, an agenda for constitutional reform under the title of Protecting the Constitution. Amongst an extensive set of reform suggestions, Ekins proposes that the relationship between human rights, the courts, and delegated legislation ought to be recast.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 22nd February 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Deprivation of liberty, family members and what s4B does (and doesn’t) say – Local Government Lawyer

‘A judge recently considered very strong objections levelled by a family member to the idea that they were depriving their adult child of their liberty. She also helpfully clarified the current (limited) scope of s.4B MCA 2005, writes Alex Ruck Keene.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 19th February 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Directors’ duties to disclose conflicts of interest: Fairford Water Ski Club v Cohoon & Craig Cohoon Watersports [2021] EWCA Civ 143 – Guildhall Chambers

‘On 9 February 2021, the Court of Appeal unanimously allowed Mr Cohoon and Craig Cohoon Watersports’ (“Watersports”) appeal against the decision of His Honour Judge Russen QC at first instance ([2020] EWHC 290 (Comm)).’

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Guildhall Chambers, 15th February 2021

Source: www.guildhallchambers.co.uk

R v R [2021] EWCA Crim 35 – Broadway House Chambers

Posted February 18th, 2021 in human rights, news, notification, statutory interpretation, terrorism by sally

‘Stephen Wood QC considers this important recent case concerning the notification requirements imposed upon Defendants, following conviction for terrorism offences.’

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Broadway House Chambers, 17th February 2021

Source: broadwayhouse.co.uk

Drafting an information for breach of an enforcement notice: Ceredigion CC v Robinson & others – 5SAH

‘An allegation of an offence in an information or charge must describe the offence in ordinary language and make it clear what the prosecutor alleges. Amendments to section 179 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (TCPA 1990) mean that it is no longer necessary, when prosecuting a defendant for non-compliance with an enforcement notice, to aver within the information the date upon which the period of compliance expired. The court held that the exact moment at which the compliance period expired was no longer of critical or defining importance. It is a necessary inference within an information that the date upon which the offence is said to have been committed, occurred after the period of compliance had expired. The prosecutor would still need to prove as a fact that the date for compliance had expired, but this fact was not essential to enable the defendant to understand what the prosecutor was alleging.’

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5SAH, 16th February 2021

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Ronan Cormacain: Queen’s Consent and the Crown’s exemption from lockdown rules – are we all in this together? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘There have been recent revelations about the use of the Queen’s consent procedure in relation to Government Bills. At the heart of the issue is the role of the Queen and the Prince of Wales, in vetting Acts of Parliament before they are made. With that background, this paper examines the applicability of some of the coronavirus lockdown rules to Crown land. My conclusion is that the Crown has special and unjustified privileges in the both the content of legislation and the procedure for making it.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 15th February 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Is it a single dwelling? Determination of breach not required where shop converted to multiple flats in breach of lease – Hardwicke Chambers

‘David Peachey was recently successful in Zash Properties Limited v Landau Medical Consultancy Limited (County Court, HHJ Johns QC), which dealt with the conversion of a shop into two studio flats in breach of lease. The case raises interesting points about whether a determination of breach is required prior to the service of s.146 notices in respect of headleases of multiple dwellings, and whether it is reasonable for a landlord to refuse consent for change of use from commercial to residential use because of the statutory rights applicable to residential long leases.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Divisional Court finds Mental Health Act assessments require physical attendance and cannot be undertaken remotely – Local Government Lawyer

‘The phrases “personally seen” in s. 11(5) of the Mental Health Act 1983 and “personally examined” in s. 12(1) require the physical attendance of the person in question on the patient, the Divisional Court has clarified.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 25th January 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Fishbourne Developments Limited v Stephens – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘On 16 December 2020 the Court of Appeal handed down judgment in the case of Fishbourne Development Limited v Stephens. The case concerned the interpretation of an option agreement to acquire a farm comprising fields and farm buildings. Arguments in the case were centred around the meaning of the phrase “any development of the Property” within the option agreement, which was contained within the definition of “Planning Permission”.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

“Wrongful Life” Revisited – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In Evie Toombes v. Dr. Philip Mitchell [2020] EWHC 3506 the High Court has given renewed consideration to claims for, so called, “wrongful life”. Can a disabled person ever claim damages on the basis that they would not have been born but for the defendant’s negligence? The Court answered that question with a resounding “yes”.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st January 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com