Bloombery v ZXC – the Supreme Court decides – Panopticon

‘The central question for the Supreme Court in Bloombery v ZXC [2022] UKSC 5 was, as Lords Hamblen and Stephens put it (with Lord Reeds, Lloyd-Jones and Sales agreeing): “whether, in general, a person under criminal investigation has, prior to being charged, a reasonable expectation of privacy in respect of information relating to that investigation”. The short answer was “yes”.’

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Panopticon, 21st February 2022

Source: panopticonblog.com

New Judgment: Bloomberg LP v ZXC [2022] UKSC 5 – UKSC Blog

‘The Respondent is a US citizen. He and his employer were the subject of a criminal investigation by a UK Legal Enforcement Body. During that investigation, the UKLEB sent a confidential Letter of Request to the authorities of a foreign state seeking, among other things, information and documents relating to the Respondent. The Letter expressly requested that its existence and contents remain confidential.’

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UKSC Blog, 16th February 2022

Source: ukscblog.com

Bloomberg loses landmark UK supreme court case on privacy – The Guardian

Posted February 17th, 2022 in media, news, privacy, Supreme Court by sally

‘The supreme court has ruled against Bloomberg News in a landmark privacy case that will make it harder for British media outlets to publish information about individuals subject to criminal investigations.’

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The Guardian, 16th February 2022

Source: www.theguardian.com

Human rights reform would leave former SC justice ‘very confused’ – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted February 10th, 2022 in human rights, news, precedent, Supreme Court by sally

‘Reforming human rights legislation to give priority consideration to domestic law could create uncertainty, a former Supreme Court justice has warned.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 9th February 2022

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Donnchadh Greene and Gabriel Tan: Statutory Interpretation and Citizenship: D4 v SSHD and PRCBC v SSHD – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘This piece considers two recent decisions – one by the Court of Appeal (“CA”): D4 v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2022] EWCA Civ 33, and the other by the Supreme Court (“SC”): R (The Project for the Registration of Children as British Citizens) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2022] UKSC 3 (“PRCBC”). At a general level, the cases raised similar issues: both involved challenges to delegation legislation on grounds that they were ultra vires; both related to citizenship – D4 about its deprivation, PRCBC about its conferral. This piece seeks to draw some threads from the two cases about statutory interpretation and the common law in the context of citizenship.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 9th February 2022

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Supreme Court dismisses protestors’ appeal over PKK flag conviction – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Pwr v Director of Public Prosecutions [2022] UKSC 2. On 26 January 2022 the Supreme Court ruled that s.13(1) Terrorism Act 2000 (“TA 2000 “) is a strict liability offence and that, whilst it does interfere with Art.10 ECHR (freedom of expression), the interference is lawful, necessary and proportionate.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 3rd February 2022

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

New Judgment: Public Prosecutors Office of the Athens Court of Appeal v O’Connor [2022] UKSC 4 – UKSC Blog

‘The Respondent was ordered to be extradited to Greece for the purposes of conducting a criminal prosecution against him. On that day, the Respondent’s solicitor stated orally in court that an appeal would be lodged against the extradition order, and on 16 December 2015, the notice of application for leave to appeal was filed with the Court. However, due to an oversight, the solicitor failed to serve the notice on the Crown Solicitor’s Office (on behalf of Greece) until about three weeks later.’

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UKSC Blog, 3rd February 2022

Source: ukscblog.com

Supreme Court throws out legal challenge against £1,012 child citizenship fee – The Independent

‘The Supreme Court has thrown out a legal challenge against the government’s £1,000 child citizenship fee, which campaigners argue many children cannot afford.’

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The Independent, 2nd February 2022

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Case Comment: Lloyd v Google LLC [2021] UKSC 50 – UKSC Blog

‘In this post, Kenny Henderson and Alex Askew of CMS comment on the Supreme Court’s decision in Lloyd v Google LLC [2021] UKSC 50, which concerned whether a representative data protection action seeking damages for loss of control of personal data could be brought on behalf of large numbers of unidentifiable class members.’

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UKSC Blog, 31st January 2022

Source: ukscblog.com

Julian Assange wins first stage of attempt to appeal against extradition – The Guardian

Posted January 26th, 2022 in appeals, extradition, freedom of expression, news, spying, Supreme Court by sally

‘The WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will be able to go to the supreme court in the UK to challenge a decision allowing him to be extradited to the US to face espionage charges.’

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The Guardian, 24th January 2022

Source: www.theguardian.com

Supreme Court invited to consider secondary victim claims – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Paul & Ors v The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust [2022] EWCA Civ 12 (13 January 2022). The Court of Appeal dismissed a set of claims for psychiatric injury on the basis of prior binding authority, but indicated that the issue is suitable for consideration by the Supreme Court.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 20th January 2022

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Settled by Settlers – Nearly Legal

Posted January 17th, 2022 in appeals, housing, landlord & tenant, leases, news, service charges, Supreme Court by tracey

‘FirstPort Property Services Ltd v Settlers Court RTM Co Ltd [2022] UKSC 1 is a big deal in the world of residential leasehold property disputes. Whilst I can’t say that the result is particuarly surprising, I imagine it has sent lawyers, RTM company directors and the Law Commission into a bit of a spin.’

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Nearly Legal, 15th January 2022

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

The ‘right to manage’ and shared estate facilities – Local Government Lawyer

Posted January 13th, 2022 in easements, landlord & tenant, leases, news, service charges, Supreme Court by tracey

‘In a key ruling on the “right to manage” and wider estate facilities, the Supreme Court has overturned the Court of Appeal’s ruling in Gala Unity. Simon Allison and Kimberley Ziya consider the implications.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 12th January 2022

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Lewis Graham: Going beyond, and going against, the Strasbourg Court – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted January 11th, 2022 in gender, human rights, interpretation, news, passports, Supreme Court, treaties by tracey

‘Section 2 of the Human Rights Act (HRA) requires that domestic courts “take into account” relevant Strasbourg case law when dealing with substantive claims under that Act. The classic authority on the application of this provision remains – for now – that of Lord Bingham: courts should “keep pace with the Strasbourg jurisprudence as it evolves over time: no more but certainly no less”.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 11th January 2022

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Supreme Court to hear case on planning conditions and dedication of highways – Local Government Lawyer

Posted January 11th, 2022 in appeals, local government, news, planning, road safety, roads, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Supreme Court has given Swindon Borough Council permission to appeal in a case about whether a planning condition can require the dedication of a highway.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 10th January 2022

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

One date to rule them all: McQuillan, McGuigan and McKenna [2021] UKSC 55 – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted January 10th, 2022 in appeals, human rights, news, Northern Ireland, Supreme Court, torture by tracey

‘In one of its final decisions of 2021, McQuillan, McGuigan and McKenna, the UK Supreme Court addressed challenges to the effectiveness of police investigations into events which took place during the Northern Ireland conflict. The European Court has long maintained that the right to life (Article 2 ECHR) and the prohibition upon torture and inhuman and degrading treatment (Article 3 ECHR) carry with them positive obligations on the state to conduct effective investigations. These “legacy” cases not only draw the Courts into debates over some of the most contentious aspects of the Northern Ireland conflict, in particular the involvement of state agents in killings and the infliction of serious harms upon individuals, but they also pose questions about how human rights law applied in the context of Northern Ireland as a jurisdiction before the enactment of the Human Rights Act 1998.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th January 2022

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Climate lawyer loses supreme court appeal over Heathrow leak – The Guardian

‘A lawyer and climate campaigner who leaked the result of a supreme court ruling on the Heathrow airport expansion has lost an appeal against a contempt of court finding.’

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The Guardian, 20th December 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

New Judgment: Her Majesty’s Attorney General v Crosland [2021] UKSC 58 – UKSC Blog

‘The court unanimously dismissed this appeal concerning whether the Supreme Court was wrong to decide that the appellant’s disclosure of the result of the Heathrow appeal, in breach of an embargo on the Court’s judgment, constituted a contempt of court. Furthermore, did the Court then wrongly impose a fine of £5,000 on the appellant, and wrongly order him to pay the respondent’s costs in the sum of £15,000?’

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UKSC Blog, 20th December 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

New Judgment: R (on the application of Elan-Cane) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2021] UKSC 56 – UKSC Blog

Posted December 16th, 2021 in gender, government departments, human rights, news, passports, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court unanimously dismissed this appeal concerning whether the Court of Appeal was wrong in its conclusion that Her Majesty’s Passport Office’s policy does not unjustifiably breach articles 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights (“ECHR”).The policy in question holds that (i) an applicant for a passport must declare their gender/sex as being either male or female and (ii) a passport will only be issued bearing a male (“M”) or female (“F”) indicator in the gender/sex field on the face of the passport and will not be issued with an “unspecified” (“X”) gender marker.’

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UKSC Blog, 15th December 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

Gender-neutral passports: Campaigner Christie Elan-Cane loses Supreme Court case – BBC News

Posted December 15th, 2021 in appeals, gender, government departments, human rights, news, passports, Supreme Court by tracey

‘A campaigner has lost a Supreme Court case challenging the government’s refusal to issue gender neutral passports.’

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BBC News, 15th December 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk