Getting late legal advice not a ground for set aside of possession order – Nearly Legal

Posted July 13th, 2020 in appeals, housing, landlord & tenant, legal representation, news, repossession by sally

‘This was Mr Sangha’s appeal of a refusal of his application to set aside a possession order against his property by a lender who had a charge on the property against a bridging loan which was not repaid. The back story is somewhat complicated, involving commercial properties, loans and leases, but not relevant to the grounds of the decision, so anyone interested can read the judgment.’

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Nearly Legal, 12th July 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Court of Appeal on: tilted balance, settlement boundaries and standard method – No. 5 Chambers

Posted July 10th, 2020 in appeals, boundaries, chambers articles, local government, news, planning by sally

‘Oxton Farm had unsuccessfully sought judicial review of the decision of Harrogate Borough Council (the Council) to grant outline planning permission for 21 new homes and a village shop in Bickerton, North Yorkshire in September 2018 and appealed the judgment of the High Court to the Court of Appeal.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 8th July 2020

Source: www.no5.com

Supreme Court hands down judgment in Villiers v Villiers – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘Charles and Emma Villiers married in 1994. They moved to Scotland the following year and lived there throughout their married life. The couple separated in 2012, when the wife and the parties’ daughter left the former matrimonial home and moved to England, where the wife continues to reside. Mrs Villiers issued a divorce petition in July 2013 on the basis of her habitual residence for 12 months preceding the presentation of the petition.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 1st July 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Court of Appeal Re-examines Test for Causation Under Section 15 of the Equality Act 2010 – Old Square Chambers

‘The Court of Appeal has delivered judgment in the case of Robinson v Department for Work and Pensions [2020] EWCA Civ 859, a decision which confirms that it is insufficient for a Claimant to argue, on a claim under section 15 of the Equality Act 2010, that “but for” their disability they would not have been put in a situation that led to unfavourable treatment. Rather, the focus needs to be on the reasons for the treatment itself. In so finding, the Court has approved of the obiter comments of Underhill LJ in Dunn v Secretary of State for Justice [2019] IRLR 298.’

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Old Square Chambers, 7th July 2020

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

Negligence claim over divorce assets ruled to be time-barred – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted July 10th, 2020 in appeals, damages, divorce, law firms, negligence, news, time limits by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has upheld a law firm’s case that a £125,000 professional negligence claim against a firm for its handling of a divorce was issued too late. In Holt v Holley & Steer Solicitors (a firm), judges held that any alleged cause of action happened in the lead-up to divorce proceedings being finalised, and this was the starting point for the six-year limitation period.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 8th July 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Rectification of the Land Register – 39 Essex Chambers

‘The Court of Appeal in Dhillon v Barclays Bank Plc and the Chief Land Registrar [2020] EWCA Civ 619 has recently given judgment in an important case involving the rectification of the Land Register. It has given new guidance on the test of ‘exceptional circumstances’ in Schedule 4 of the Land Registration Act 2002. It has also repeated a warning to practitioners that pleadings should clearly identify the issues to be resolved.’

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39 Essex Chambers, 1st July 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Marriage discrimination: Gould v St Johns Downshire Hill UKEAT/0002/20/BA – 3PB

‘The Claimant, Mr Gould, was a vicar of an evangelical Christian church, St Johns, Downshire Hill, in Hampstead, London (the Respondent). In August 2016, he was dismissed from his role. The reason given by the Respondent was an irretrievable breakdown in relations between the Claimant and the Trustees, the Leadership Team, certain members of staff and other members of the congregation. The Claimant alleged that the reason for his dismissal was the breakdown of his marriage in May 2015. He brought a claim to the ET, alleging direct marriage discrimination, and that his dismissal was for a discriminatory reason and procedurally unfair.’

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3PB, 1st July 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

One size fits all? – No. 5 Chambers

‘The recent judgment of the Court of Appeal in Re LC (A Child) (Placement Order) [2020] EWCA Civ 787 should serve as a reminder to practitioners in the field of Children Law that each case has to be considered on its peculiar facts and by reference, where applicable, to the welfare checklist in section 1 of the Children Act 1989 or the enhanced welfare checklist contained in section 1 of the Adoption and Children Act 2002.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 30th June 2020

Source: www.no5.com

Guidance from the EAT as to the calculation of a week’s pay and profitability bonuses: Econ Engineering Limited (Appellant) v Mr P Dixon and Others (Respondent) – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘For sums to be included in the calculation of a week’s pay by reference to S.221(2) Employment Rights Act (ERA) 1996, completion of normal working hours must be both a necessary and a sufficient condition for the entitlement to the relevant payment.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 6th July 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Hastings Borough Council v Turner [2020] UKUT 184 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

‘A property which was converted into flats before the Building Regulations 1991 came into force, which otherwise falls within the meaning of an HMO set out in Section 254(1)(e) of the Housing Act 2004, will be an HMO unless those regulations are now complied with. When appealing the issue of an HMO license in the FTT, the burden of proof is on the applicant to establish that the property is now compliant with the Buildings Regulations 1991.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 30th June 2020

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

The Even Longer Arm of PD51Z: An Update – Guildhall Chambers

‘In the conjoined cases, the tenant (TFS Stores Limited) was the same, but the landlord was different. The tenant will be better known to many as The Fragrance Shop, and the cases at first instance focused on whether the leases in the actions were excluded from the 1954 Act protections. According to HHJ Davis-White QC, they were, and possession orders were made in respect of 5 of the 6 premises caught up in proceedings.’

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Guildhall Chambers, 6th July 2020

Source: www.guildhallchambers.co.uk

Villiers v Villiers – Blackstone Chambers

‘This appeal concerned the jurisdiction of an English court to make a maintenance order in favour of the wife (“W”) pursuant to s.27 of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 (“MCA”) in circumstances where the parties lived for most of their marriage in Scotland and the divorce proceedings issued by the husband (“H”) were conducted in Scotland.’

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Blackstone Chambers, 1st July 2020

Source: www.blackstonechambers.com

The Criminal Procedure Rules – Not Just for Decoration by Paul Canfield – Broadway House Chambers

‘The recent case of R v Smith [2020] EWCA Crim 777 highlighted just how important the Criminal Procedure Rules are, and how, despite the pressures that practitioners face, they must be complied with to deal with any disputes surrounding evidence or procedure that may arise.’

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Broadway House Chambers, 29th June 2020

Source: broadwayhouse.co.uk

Court of Appeal upholds “unparalleled” Housing (Wales) Act 2014 eviction rules – Local Government Lawyer

Posted July 10th, 2020 in appeals, housing, landlord & tenant, licensing, news, notification, repossession, Wales by sally

‘Welsh law means that a landlord who is unlicensed cannot lawfully serve an eviction notice on tenants, the Court of Appeal has found.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 9th July 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Landmark Supreme Court Judgment on Interchange Fees – Monckton Chambers

Posted July 10th, 2020 in appeals, banking, chambers articles, competition, fees, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘On 17 June 2020, the Supreme Court (Lords Reed, Hodge, Lloyd-Jones, Sales and Hamblen) handed down a landmark judgment on whether certain fees which are paid by merchants to banks under the Visa and Mastercard payment card schemes breach competition law. The judgment finally settles years of litigation in the UK courts, and deep divisions in the rulings which had been given in the lower courts and tribunals. It is also the first judgment of the Supreme Court dealing with the Court of Appeal’s powers of remittal.’

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Monckton Chambers, July 2020

Source: www.monckton.com

Is COVID-19 a Barder Event? Considering the enforceability of financial settlements in light of COVID-19 – Thomas More Chambers

‘The potential short and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis upon the global and national economy are now well-known. Financial remedy practitioners have been anticipating a number of queries from clients potentially seeking to make an application to set aside their concluded financial settlements, because of the effect current events have had or may have upon their finances. Questions therefore arise about whether or not the effects of COVID-19 are capable of being treated as a Barder Event by the family courts, and thus to act as a basis to revisit final financial remedy orders.’

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Thomas More Chambers, 6th July 2020

Source: www.thomasmore.co.uk

Trecarrell House Ltd v Rouncefield [2020] EWCA Civ 760 – Tanfield Chambers

‘The Court of Appeal held that the failure to serve a gas safety certificate on a tenant before the tenant took up occupation of the demised premises was not fatal to the landlord’s later ability to serve a section 21 notice.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 30th July 2020

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

London Borough of Hackney v Okoro [2020] EWCA Civ 681 – Tanfield Chambers

‘If possession proceedings were initially “brought” under CPR Part 55, and are not caught by one of the exceptions set out in CPR PD 51Z Para.2A, then the automatic stay imposed by the practice direction takes effect.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 30th June 2020

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Triplerose Limited v Beattie and Beattie [2020] UKUT 180 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

‘A lease that contains a covenant against use other than as a private dwellinghouse is breached where the tenant opts to let the property out on short term lets through sites such as Airbnb and Booking.com. However, where the tenant still makes regular use of the property as a residence in and around those bookings, the tenant will not be in breach of a separate covenant not to carry on a business from the property (as distinct from a covenant not to use the property for a business).’

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Tanfield Chambers, 30th June 2020

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Watchdog challenges ruling on lethal force by UK firearms officers – The Guardian

‘A police watchdog has begun an appeal after failing to bring misconduct proceedings against a specialist firearms officer who shot and killed a man while trying to foil an attempt to snatch two prisoners from a prison van.’

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The Guardian, 7th July 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com