Airlines told to stop delaying flight compensation claims – Daily Telegraph

Posted February 27th, 2015 in airlines, compensation, delay, news by tracey

‘Airlines have been told by a judge in a test case that they cannot keep passengers waiting for compensation for delayed flights. The decision will affect tens of thousands of people demanding compensation for flight delays, according to solicitors representing Kim Allen, the passenger in today’s case.’

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Daily Telegraph, 26th February 2015

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Website operators can prohibit ‘screen scraping’ of unprotected data via terms and conditions, says EU court in Ryanair case – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 16th, 2015 in airlines, database right, EC law, electronic commerce, internet, news by sally

‘Online aggregators that engage in ‘screen scraping’ face a threat to their business models following a ruling by the EU’s highest court, an expert has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 15th January 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

Jihadis who travel to Syria could be barred from UK return for two years – The Guardian

‘Suspected jihadis, including teenagers, who travel to Syria will be prevented from returning to Britain for two years and only allowed to re-enter if they consent to face trial, home detention, regular police monitoring or go on a deradicalisation course. The plan, agreed after months of internal Whitehall talks, has been cleared by government law officers and devised to minimise legal claims that the British government will be rendering citizens stateless by barring them from the UK.’

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The Guardian, 14th November 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

High Court tests the limits of confidentiality in EC infringement decisions – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

Posted October 30th, 2014 in airlines, confidentiality, disclosure, EC law, judgments, news, price fixing by sally

‘The European Commission came in for some stern criticism from the High Court this week, in a case which looks set to test the boundaries of confidentiality in EC infringement decisions: see Emerald Supplies v BA [2014] EWHC 3515 (Ch).’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 30th October 2014

Source: www.competitionbulletin.com

Skyscanner: CAT quashes commitments in the online booking sector – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

‘In a judgment handed down on Friday, the Competition Appeal Tribunal has quashed the Office of Fair Trading’s decision to accept commitments in the online hotel booking sector. As the first case to consider such commitments, Skyscanner Ltd v CMA [2014] CAT 16 contains some helpful guidance, albeit that Skyscanner’s success actually hinged on a fairly narrow point of regulatory law.’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 28th September 2014

Source: www.competitionbulletin.com

Dawson v Thomson Airways Ltd – WLR Daily

Posted June 25th, 2014 in airlines, carriage by air, compensation, delay, EC law, law reports, limitations by sally

Dawson v Thomson Airways Ltd [2014] EWCA Civ 845; [2014] WLR (D) 279

‘The limitation period applicable to a claim brought in England for compensation for cancellation or delay under articles 5 and 7 of Parliament and Council Regulation (EC) No 261/2004 was the six-year period prescribed by section 9 of the Limitation Act 1980.’

WLR Daily, 19th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Court of Appeal rules against second airline on flight delays – Law society’s Gazette

Posted June 20th, 2014 in airlines, appeals, compensation, delay, limitations, news by tracey

‘The aviation industry has suffered another court defeat after an appeal judge ruled claims can be made up to six years after a flight delay.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 20th June 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Legal challenge to controversial herring gull cull dismissed by judge – The Guardian

‘A controversial cull of thousands of gulls in the UK will go ahead after a legal challenge by conservationists failed.’

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The Guardian, 21st May 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Delayed flights may cost airlines billions after test case rulings – The Guardian

Posted April 28th, 2014 in airlines, appeals, compensation, delay, news by sally

‘Airline passengers could be entitled to billions of pounds’ worth of compensation, depending on the outcome of two flight delay cases at the court of appeal next month.’

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The Guardian, 26th April 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Passengers face higher fares as landing charges rise – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 4th, 2013 in airlines, news by sally

“Passengers face higher fares after the Civil Aviation Authority rejected pleas from airlines for landing charges to be cut over the next five years.”

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Daily Telegraph, 3rd October 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Mail reaches out-of-court settlement with Ryanair over safety story – The Guardian

Posted September 13th, 2013 in airlines, defamation, health & safety, media, news by tracey

“Airline sued newspaper for libel after it claimed some pilots were concerned that a fuel policy may have put passengers at risk.”

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The Guardian, 12th September 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Fox v British Airways plc – WLR Daily

Fox v British Airways plc [2013] EWCA Civ 972; [2013] WLR (D) 330

“Where a claimant could establish liability for unfair dismissal and disability discrimination in respect of his son who had been a member of a company pension scheme and who died shortly after dismissal by the company for medical incapacity, the son’s estate would be entitled to compensation in a sum equivalent to the full amount of the death in service benefit that would have been payable under the scheme if the son had remained in employment at the date of his death.”

WLR Daily, 31st July 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd v Zodiac Seats UK Ltd (formerly Contour Aerospace Ltd) – WLR Daily

Posted July 5th, 2013 in airlines, damages, EC law, estoppel, law reports, patents, Supreme Court by tracey

Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd v Zodiac Seats UK Ltd (formerly Contour Aerospace Ltd):[2013] UKSC 46;   [2013] WLR (D)  265

“Where judgment was given in an English court that a patent, whether English or European, was valid and infringed, and the patent was subsequently retrospectively revoked or amended, whether in England or at the European Patent Office, the defendant was entitled to rely on the fact of the revocation or amendment on an inquiry as to damages in respect of the unamended patent.”

WLR Daily, 3rd July 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Damages for infringement should be calculated on basis of amended not original patents, rules Supreme Court – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 5th, 2013 in airlines, appeals, damages, news, patents, Supreme Court by tracey

“The UK Supreme Court has ruled that companies found to have infringed patents can rely on the subsequent amendment of patent claims to exonerate them from liability for damages.”

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th July 2013

Source: www.out-law.com

Airline compensation: law firm flies to aid of delayed passengers – The Guardian

“A Cheshire solicitors has recovered more than £300,000 for 700 passengers with their no-win no-fee service.”

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The Guardian, 15th June 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Strasbourg judgment: Eweida and others v UK – Head of Legal

“Nadia Eweida has succeeded in her claim that the UK breached her right to manifest her religion under article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Readers may remember that she worked for British Airways, and refused to abide by its uniform policy, insisting on wearing a cross visible to customers. By a majority of five to two (the dissenters including the Court’s British former President, Sir Nicolas Bratza), the judges of the European Court of Human Rights found that the English court that dismissed her religious discrimination and human rights claim at national level, the Court of Appeal, gave too much weight to BA’s corporate aims and not enough to Ms Eweida’s desire to manifest her religion by wearing her cross. In consequence, the UK breached its ‘positive obligation’ to protect her right to manifest her religion.”

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Head of Legal, 15th January 2013

Source: www.headoflegal.com

Strasbourg rules against UK on BA crucifix issue, but rejects three other religious rights challenges – UK Human Rights Blog

“The Strasbourg Court has today [15 January] come up with something of a mixed message in relation to religion at work. They have voted that there is a right to manifest individual faith by wearing religious adornments but not by objecting to practices that are protected by anti-discrimination legislation.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 15th January 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Landmark victory for BA employee over right to wear a cross at work – The Guardian

“After seven years of legal appeals and accusations that Christians are being persecuted for their beliefs, the European court of human rights has ruled that a British Airways check-in operator should not have been prevented from wearing a cross at work.”

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The Guardian, 15th January 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

BA worker’s rights were infringed by cross ban, European court rules – The Guardian

“A British Airways check-in worker’s right to express her religion was unfairly restricted when she was prevented from wearing a cross at work, the European court of human rights (ECHR) has ruled.”

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The Guardian, 15th January 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

British Airways plc v Williams and others – WLR Daily

Posted October 19th, 2012 in airlines, EC law, holiday pay, law reports, remuneration, working time by sally

British Airways plc v Williams and others [2012] UKSC 43; [2012] WLR (D) 277

“Where a group of airline pilots’ claimed that their paid annual leave (as required by a European Aviation Directive) should include their regular supplementary allowances as well as their basic pay and, on a reference by the Supreme Court, the Court of Justice of the European Union had interpreted the Directive as requiring pay for annual leave to correspond to normal remuneration, assessed as being the average over a representative period of all remuneration save that intended exclusively to cover costs, the absence of a detailed domestic legislative scheme implementing the Directive’s requirements as to paid annual leave did not preclude an employment tribunal from making such an assessment.”

WLR Daily, 17th October 2012

Source: www.iclr.co.uk