Simon Halliday, Jed Meers, and Joe Tomlinson: Public Attitudes on Compliance with COVID-19 Lockdown Restrictions – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In March 2020, the government introduced a set of restrictions to ‘lockdown’ the UK in response to the COVID-19 pandemic (The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020; The Health Protection (Coronavirus Restrictions) (Wales) Regulations 2020; The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2020). These lockdown restrictions form the central plank of a wide range of government interventions, which to date include the 359-page Coronavirus Act 2020, 61 statutory instruments (emerging from 46 different parent acts), and an even greater amount of policy and guidance. The central purpose of the lockdown restrictions is to protect public health, by both containing the rate of infection and protecting NHS capacity to treat the influx of COVID-19 patients. There has been a lively legal debate about the restrictions—described as ‘almost certainly the most severe restrictions on liberty ever imposed.’ In addition to the legal debate, however, we also need a socio-legal analysis. An examination of how the public understand and experience the lockdown, and the significance of these perceptions for compliance, is essential to developing a clear picture of how the lockdown restrictions are working. Understanding the role of law in society, and not only in strict ‘legal’ terms, has rarely been so important.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 8th May 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Court of Appeal rejects challenge over lawfulness of PD51Z staying possession proceedings: report – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Court of Appeal has upheld the lawfulness of Practice Direction 51Z, the Housing Law Practitioners Association (HLPA) has reported.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 12th May 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

“Repugnant to Ordinary Notions of Fairness”? The Crime of Leaving Your House – The 36 Group

‘On a sunny afternoon in April 2020, a couple sit on the grass in Finsbury Park, North London. A police officer approaches them. A month later, they plead Not Guilty at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court to an offence of Leaving/Being Outside Home Without Reasonable Excuse, contrary to Regulations 9(1) and 6(1) of the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020 (as amended). Two months later, they attend court again for trial.’

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The 36 Group, 24th April 2020

Source: 36group.co.uk

Judge questions coronavirus case against ‘homeless’ London man – The Guardian

‘A judge has questioned the Crown Prosecution Service’s decision to charge a man who said he was homeless with allegedly breaching coronavirus regulations by leaving “the place where he was living”.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Coronavirus Act 2020: Does it permit mandatory vaccinations? – Garden Court Chambers

‘There are multiple human rights and civil liberties implications both globally and domestically arising from the response to COVID-19 and the current crisis. Some of them are very real and concerning. Others are scaremongering and simply not true.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 1st May 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

C19 Possession Proceedings: Current Guidance – Thomas More Chambers

‘On 18 March 2020, it was announced by the government that there would be a ban on evictions for a three-month period (with effect from 27 March 2020), this has presented numerous questions to both landlords, occupiers and owners alike. Set out below is the current position in relation to action arising out of residential property occupation (commercial leases and agreements are subject to different legislative regimes).The information within this article is correct as at 26 April 2020, you are strongly advised to obtain independent legal advice if you are unsure as to your rights and obligations.’

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Thomas More Chambers, 28th April 2020

Source: www.thomasmore.co.uk

What are the data privacy considerations of Contact Tracing Apps? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Coronavirus presents a serious threat to society, legitimising the collection of public health data under Article 9:2 (g) of GDPR regulations, which allows the processing of such data if “necessary for reasons of substantial public interest”. Some of this collection will take the form of contact tracing apps, which have been used in containing the spread of coronavirus in countries such as Singapore.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 1st May 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Nyasha Weinberg: Parliament must legislate on the government’s plans for contact tracing apps – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘ Today the Joint Committee on Human Rights will take evidence from the Information Commissioner, academics and the CEO of NHSX on the risks to the right to privacy (Article 8 ECHR) if a contact tracing app is introduced to track and slow the spread of the coronavirus. This is helpful scrutiny of the government’s plans. Yet if the government goes ahead with its proposed contact-tracing application it is essential that the processing of large amounts of personal data by the state, even if done in the public interest, needs a clear legal basis in the form of specific legislation.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 4th May 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Children’s Commissioner for England calls for revocation of “unnecessary” regulations relaxing children’s social care protections – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, has sharply criticised the government’s relaxation of regulations relating to children’s social care, saying she does not believe that they are necessary except in one limited case.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 1st May 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Furloughed from work? It pays to know your rights – The Guardian

Posted May 4th, 2020 in company law, coronavirus, emergency powers, employment, news, remuneration by sally

‘The rules of the government’s job retention scheme are complex. We put your questions to an employment specialist to cut through the confusion.’

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The Guardian, 3rd May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Make bedside oral wills legal during pandemic, UK campaigners urge – The Guardian

‘Oral wills should be made legal during the coronavirus pandemic in the same way that they are permitted in times of war, say campaigners.’

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The Guardian, 2nd May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020, and a little bit of history. – Transparency Project

‘The regulations make changes to the duties that local authorities have with regards to safeguarding children. These are temporary changes and the regulations give a date in September 2020 for them to lapse. This date can be extended, reviewed or simply removed. They were simply made by virtue of the Coronavirus Act 2020. Parliament did not need to approve them first.’

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Transparency Project, 3rd May 2020

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

UK government faces legal challenge to lockdown from businessman – The Guardian

‘The government is facing a challenge to the legality of the coronavirus lockdown by a wealthy businessman who fears it will kill more people than it saves.’

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The Guardian, 1st May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Frederick Cowell: Lifting the Lockdown: The Human Rights Issues – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The Coronavirus Act 2020, which was passed in less than three days by Parliament, does not contain the restrictions governing the lockdown in England. These are contained in the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (the Regulations) passed under the Public Health (Control of Diseases) Act 1984. Devolved governments have pursued similar strategies in this respect. As Professor Jeff King has argued on this blog, s.45 of the 1984 Act can be ‘construed literally to confer powers to impose the lockdown’ because it allows for restrictions on ‘persons, things or premises in the event’ of a threat to public health. Like all secondary legislation, following s.3 of the Human Rights Act 1998 this needs to be compatible with the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Yet, as this post sets out, some difficult rights trade-offs and restrictions may come from lifting lockdown restrictions requiring us to revaluate what we consider as normal in terms of balancing rights and liberties.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 1st May 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Making Sense of the Amended Lockdown Law – UK Human Rights Blog

‘As has been widely reported, the ‘lockdown’ imposed by the UK Government to tackle the continuing pandemic is governed in the main by the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020 (SI 2020/350) (the Original Regulations).’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 1st May 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Coronavirus and Clinical Negligence – Coronavirus: Guidance for Lawyers and Businesses

‘Nigel Poole QC considers the question: how will the Coronavirus pandemic affect clinical negligence litigation in England and Wales?’

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Coronavirus: Guidance for Lawyers and Businesses, 30th April 2020

Source: lawinthetimeofcorona.wordpress.com

Coronavirus: More than 9,000 fines for lockdown breaches – BBC News

‘More than 9,000 fines have been issued in England and Wales for breaching coronavirus lockdown restrictions.’

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BBC News, 30th April 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Call for employment tribunals to have more power to protect workers – The Guardian

‘Employment tribunals should be given powers to make awards of up to £100,000 for breach of contract and to deal with disputes where staff are still in work, the Law Commission has recommended.’

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The Guardian, 29th April 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Coronavirus Q&A: Changes to housing eviction notices – Law Society’s Gazette

‘In these rapidly changing and arguably unsettling times, the government has moved to create legislation to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 29th April 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Appeal judges to rule on legality of Covid-19 practice direction – Litigation Futures

‘The Court of Appeal is to rule on Thursday on the power of the Master of the Rolls (MR) to make an emergency practice direction in response to Covid-19.’

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Litigation Futures, 29th April 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com