Pets and divorce – who keeps the family pet? – Family Law

Posted December 4th, 2017 in animals, custody, dispute resolution, divorce, news by sally

‘For many couples pets are an integral part of family life. But when relationships break down, it is not uncommon for arguments to arise about who gets to keep the family pet. So how do these disputes get resolved and what are the rules?’

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Family Law, 1st December 2017

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Article 15 transfer requests – what happens next? (FE v MR and Others) – Family Law

Posted November 20th, 2017 in children, contact orders, custody, divorce, EC law, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘Family analysis: Analysing a case where the Family Court submitted a ‘highly unusual’ request under Article 15 of Brussels II bis to the Spanish court for it to transfer jurisdiction to the courts of England and Wales, Chris Stevenson, barrister at Fourteen, questions how such cases will be approached in a post-Brexit world.’

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Family Law, 17th November 2017

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Divorcing parents who poison children against their former partner could lose custody – The Independent

Posted November 20th, 2017 in contact orders, custody, divorce, news by tracey

‘Divorcing parents could lose custody or be denied contact with their children if they attempt to poison them against their former partner, under the rules of a new pilot scheme.
The “groundbreaking” initiative, being trialled by the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (Cafcass), is designed to tackle the problem officially known as “parental alienation” where one parent turns a child against the other so they do not want to see them.’

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The Independent, 19th November 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Surrogate mother who changed her mind must hand baby to gay couple, court rules – Daily Telegraph

Posted November 20th, 2017 in custody, news, surrogacy by tracey

‘A surrogate mother has lost custody of her child after a court ruled he would be better placed with the gay couple who arranged for her to have the baby.’

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Daily Telegraph, 17th November 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Met Police holding children in custody for too long, says prison watchdog – The Independent

Posted November 9th, 2017 in children, custody, London, news, police, young offenders by tracey

‘Children are being held for too long in police custody once they are charged with an offence, the prison watchdog has warned. A report by HM Inspectorate of Prisons and HM Inspectorate of Constabulary found that too many children in north and north-east London were being kept in cells overnight and even at weekends, despite a statutory duty for authorities to provide them with alternative accommodation.’

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The Independent, 8th November 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Divorce and children – is shared care a right or responsibility? – Family Law

Posted October 9th, 2017 in children, custody, divorce, families, news, parental responsibility, parental rights by sally

‘‘I know my rights’ – With that statement a family lawyer will naturally turn to s 2A of the Children Act 1989 and the presumption of parental involvement.
‘Parents do not have rights, they have responsibilities’ – Arguably one is now considering the court’s overriding objective and paramount consideration as set out in s 1 of the Children Act 1989 which highlights the welfare of any child.’

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Family Law, 5th October 2017

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Family court changes to protect children ‘lifesaving’ – BBC News

Posted October 2nd, 2017 in children, contact orders, custody, domestic violence, family courts, homicide, news by sally

‘New family court guidance to protect children from violent parents during custody disputes is “lifesaving,” domestic violence campaigners say.’

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BBC News, 29th September 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Best Interests and Transfers of Proceedings under Article 15 Brussels II Revised in a Public Law Context – Where are we now? – Family Law Week

Posted August 10th, 2017 in children, custody, EC law, news, Supreme Court, transfer of proceedings, treaties by tracey

‘Maria Wright, PhD Student at the University of Bristol, addresses how courts must now approach Article 15 transfers of public law proceedings in the light of CJEU and Supreme Court judgments.’

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Family Law Week, 9th August 2017

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Judge writes to teenager to explain why he can’t live with his father – Daily Telegraph

Posted July 28th, 2017 in children, custody, judges, news by tracey

‘Judge writes to teenager to explain why he can’t live with his father.’

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Daily Telegraph, 27th July 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

F v L (Child Arrangements Order: Relocation) – WLR Daily

Posted June 15th, 2017 in appeals, children, custody, domestic violence, law reports by sally

F v L (Child Arrangements Order: Relocation)[2017] EWHC 1377 (Fam)

‘The mother, an Italian national, sought a child arrangements order (“CAO”) under section 8 of the Children Act 1989, as amended, in respect of the child, aged five, and permission to relocate with him to Italy, alleging serious domestic abuse by the father. The Italian father opposed the application for relocation and cross-applied for a shared care CAO. Despite the recommendation in the report prepared by the CAFCASS officer that the child’s main carer be his mother and that she should be given permission to relocate to Italy, the trial judge decided not to consider or make any finding in respect of the abuse allegations, refused the mother’s application to relocate and ordered the continuance of the shared care regime. The mother appealed on the grounds, inter alia, that the trial judge had made a fundamental procedural error in failing to resolve the issue of the future care of the child prior to considering the application for relocation and had failed to make findings on the abuse allegations.’

WLR Daily, 9th June 2017

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Parents film children to win custody battles in bitter divorce cases – Daily Telegraph

Posted April 10th, 2017 in children, custody, divorce, evidence, news, video recordings by sally

‘Desperate parents are increasingly resorting to filming or recording their children in an attempt to win custody in bitter divorce cases, lawyers have said.’

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Daily Telegraph, 8th April 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

How is the PLO working? What is its impact on court process and outcome? – Family Law Week

‘The last five years have brought important reforms to care proceedings. The Judiciary made proposals for modernising family justice with a focus on strong judicial leadership, judicial continuity and better case management.2 The Family Justice Review3 recommended that the duration of care proceedings should be limited to 26 weeks, that fewer experts should be instructed in proceedings and there should be more limited scrutiny of the care plan, with the court considering only the plan for permanency (care by the parents(s), placement in the extended family, long-term fostering, or adoption) and not matters such as services for the child and contact arrangements. The Review’s recommendations were enacted in the Children and Families Act 2014, supplemented by new procedural rules (the PLO 2014) and implemented on April 22, 2014. This date also marked the opening of the Family Court, replacing the triple jurisdiction of the Family Proceedings Court, the County Court and the High Court. ‘

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Family Law Week, 17th February 2017

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

‘Conned trying to get my children back’ – BBC News

Posted February 13th, 2017 in custody, family courts, fees, Law Society, McKenzie friends, news by sally

‘Two parents fighting legal battles for custody of their children paid thousands of pounds to a company providing “McKenzie friends” – people with no legal training who assist in court. But they were badly let down.’

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BBC News, 13th February 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Syria couple win legal fight for care of children – BBC News

Posted December 12th, 2016 in children, custody, family courts, judgments, news, proscribed organisations, terrorism by sally

‘A Muslim couple arrested over fears that they were heading to Syria for “extremist activities” have won a court fight for the care of their children.’

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BBC News, 11th December 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Parents fear transgender children will be taken away after court ruling – The Guardian

Posted November 22nd, 2016 in care orders, custody, families, news, transsexuals by sally

‘Parents of transgender children fear their ex-partners will sue them for custody of their children after the high court ruled that a seven-year-old child who identified as transgender should be removed from the care of their mother.’

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The Guardian, 22nd November 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Around half of child prisoners now feel unsafe after large rise – The Independent

Posted November 16th, 2016 in child abuse, custody, news, race discrimination, reports, young offenders by sally

‘The number of children held in youth prisons who feel unsafe has risen significantly in recent years, an official report has warned.’

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The Independent, 15th November 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Ban use of police cells for people in mental health crisis, MPs told – The Guardian

Posted November 16th, 2016 in bills, custody, detention, mental health, news, police by sally

‘People suffering a mental health crisis should never be held in police cells as they find it terrifying and become even more unwell, ministers will be told.’

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The Guardian, 16th November 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

U v U – WLR Daily

Posted November 8th, 2016 in appeals, children, custody, family courts, law reports by sally

U v U

‘The parents of four children, two girls now aged 16 and 14 and two boys aged 12 and 6 years old, were married in Afghanistan in 1999 and came to the United Kingdom in 2000. They were all now British citizens. From 2011 the family experienced growing disagreement between the parents, and in 2012 the father married a second woman in secret which his wife did not know about until 2014. Following a number of incidents that year in which the police had sometimes been involved the father changed the locks to the marital home, the upshot being that the mother went to alternative accommodation with the three eldest children and the youngest boy stayed with the father and his second wife. By September 2014 the relationship between the parents had broken down. Proceedings in the case had been conducted before a High Court judge over some 14 hearings. At the first main fact-finding hearing in early 2015 in respect of child placement arrangements the judge made adverse findings against the mother including that she had caused the three older children emotional harm by her negative comments and outbursts against the father, that none of the mother’s allegations against the father justified ceasing contact between them and their father, and that the judge’s concern was to restore their relationship despite the mother’s resistance to contact between them and the father. The appointment of an expert psychiatrist from a well-known child health clinic was agreed between the parties to make an assessment of the family and also to offer therapy. The expert was able to achieve meetings between the three older children and the father, but unsupervised contact between the youngest child and the mother was not achieved until early 2016. At the latter contact session with the mother the child’s fringe was found to have been cut in a rough and ready manner. Each party blamed the other for the incident. It also emerged that the father had concealed a device on the child which recorded the conversation between the mother and the child. That showed that the mother had asked whether there was a new baby in the father’s house. At the welfare hearing in March 2016 the judge had four full reports from the expert who was also present and had made some recommendations, there was no CAFCASS officer’s report, the judge made further adverse findings against the mother including that she had cut the child’s hair, that she had assaulted the father and was unlikely to change her attitude towards him or that she would promote a positive relationship between the father and the three older children, that none of her allegations against the father had been proved, that at an earlier stage he had found that the three children had had an enjoyable holiday with the father in Barcelona but that they now refused to live with him because of the emotional harm caused by the mother’s attitude, and he concluded that the father was committed to the children, that the second wife was a force for good, that he was minded to order that all the children should live with the father but in the event only the older boy was ordered to reside with the father and the boy’s younger brother, noting that such an arrangement was contrary to the ordinary course for siblings to be in the same household. The mother appealed, contending that the welfare analysis was insufficient, that the older children’s wishes and feelings had not been properly considered and that a guardian should be appointed for their separate representation’

WLR Daily, 20th October 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

McPhee v The Queen – WLR Daily

McPhee v The Queen [2016] UKPC 29

‘The defendant, a 17-year-old from Nassau, was arrested on a neighbouring island of The Bahamas on suspicion of murder following an armed robbery. He gave his mother’s phone number in Nassau to the police but no contact with her was established and no lawyer was called. After more than 31 hours in custody, during which time the custody log showed he had been taken from his cell several times but without any record made of his being questioned, a church minister in his mid-seventies was asked to come to the police station to witness the defendant make a statement. The minister did not speak to the defendant alone nor offer him any advice, but observed that the defendant was hungry and gave the police money to buy him a meal, after which the defendant made a written statement under caution confessing to the murder. Apart from the confession the only evidence against the defendant was that of another defendant who became a prosecution witness during the trial. At trial, the defendant claimed that his statement had been made following torture and so was not admissible. The judge rejected the claim of torture but did not consider whether the taking of the defendant from his cells had been for the purpose of informal interrogation, or whether the minister could properly be said to have been acting as an “appropriate adult” for the witnessing of a juvenile’s confession, and allowed the confession to go before the jury. The defendant was convicted of murder. The conviction was upheld by the Court of Appeal of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The defendant appealed to the Privy Council on the grounds, inter alia, that the confession should have been excluded under section 20 of the Bahamas Evidence Act as being unreliable, by reason of the defendant having been subjected to unrecorded questioning in the absence of a lawyer or appropriate adult and in any event should have been excluded as unfair under section 178 of the Bahamas Evidence Act.’

WLR Daily, 24th October 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Archer v Titchener: what would a family court decide? – Family Law Week

Posted September 30th, 2016 in change of name, children, custody, domestic violence, news, parental responsibility by tracey

‘Jennifer Kotilaine, Pauline Troy, Emma Romer and Eilidh Gardner, all barristers at 42 Bedford Row, consider the family law implications for the Archer family following Helen’s much-publicised acquittal in the criminal court.’

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Family law Week, 21st September 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk