Ending flexible tenancies – a reminder – NearlyLegal

Posted February 25th, 2015 in costs, forfeiture, housing, landlord & tenant, news by sally

‘We don’t usually (indeed ever) repost previous material on NL. But I’m making an exception for this one, because I think it is timely. Flexible tenancies have been in existence for a while in some boroughs and I would expect that it is round about now that possession proceedings for a fault based grounds (rather than the end of the term and non-renewal of the flexible tenancy) would be starting to happen. I haven’t seen any yet, but my local boroughs don’t have flexible tenancies.’

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NearlyLegal, 24th February 2015

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Landlords shunning foreigners because of their accents, after new rules preventing illegal migrants from renting – The Independent

‘Landlords are preparing to turn away tenants just because they have a foreign accent, as a consequence of new rules making it an offence to let rooms to illegal migrants.’

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The Independent, 15th February 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Lord Justice Lewison and the Return of English – NearlyLegal

Posted February 10th, 2015 in appeals, housing, judges, landlord & tenant, legislation, news by sally

‘I recently found myself reading and writing about the Court of Appeal judgement in Edwards v Kurasamy (our report here). Doing so made me think about the recent spate of judgements given by Lewison LJ that have touched on the private rental sector. I am thinking here of Spencer v Taylor (which we analysed here), Charalambous v Ng, and now Edwards v Kumarasamy. (our report). All of these are cases that touch primarily on the Private Rented Sector and all of them feature leading judgements by Lewison LJ. These are not of course the only big PRS cases to come from the CoA recently so I am not suggesting that Lewison LJ is the only CoA judge dealing with the PRS (see McDonald v McDonald for example) but he does seem to be getting a healthy majority right now.’

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NearlyLegal, 9th February 2015

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Proposed changes to S.21 – NearlyLegal

Posted February 9th, 2015 in bills, housing, landlord & tenant, news, notification, rent, repossession by sally

‘As well as the clauses introducing the retaliatory eviction proposals, the Government’s proposed amendments to the Deregulation Bill would make some other changes to s.21. The effects would be:

No s.21 notice can be served within the first 4 months of the shorthold tenancy, thus ending the all too widespread practice of serving a s.21 at the time the tenancy agreement is signed (though I’d still say that was probably caught by the deposit rules). The proposals also make clear that possession proceedings cannot be begun before 6 months from the start of the tenancy (that disposes of an idea some bright spark landlords had, that it was OK to start proceedings before 6 months so long as the possession order was made after the 6 month date).’

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NearlyLegal, 8th February 2015

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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The revenge of retaliatory eviction law – NearlyLegal

Posted February 6th, 2015 in bills, landlord & tenant, news, repossession by sally

‘After the Teather ‘revenge eviction’ member’s bill was talked out by a couple of Tory MPs, (Chope and Davis), the question was would the proposals survive in another form before the election.’

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NearlyLegal, 5th February 2015

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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When notice is not required to succeed in an injury claim against a landlord – Zenith PI Blog

Posted February 5th, 2015 in appeals, landlord & tenant, news, notification, personal injuries by sally

‘The Appellant, (Edwards) rented a 2nd floor flat by way of an assured short hold tenancy from the Respondent (Kumarasamy). The Respondent was not the owner of the block of flats but had a long lease of the particular flat let to the Appellant. The Appellant suffered injury when he tripped over an uneven paving stone in the pathway ,between the front door of the block and the communal bins. The Respondent had received no notice of the defect prior to the accident. This was accepted.’

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Zenith PI Blog, 4th February 2015

Source: www.zenithpi.wordpress.com

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Landlords to be banned from letting draughtiest homes – The Guardian

Posted February 5th, 2015 in energy, environmental protection, landlord & tenant, news, regulations by sally

‘Landlords will be banned from renting out England and Wales’ draughtiest homes from 2018 in a bid to cut energy bills and carbon emissions. The new regulations are expected to help around a million tenants who are paying as much as £1,000 a year more than the average annual bill of £1,265 because of poorly insulated homes.’

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The Guardian, 5th February 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Edwards v Kumarasamy – WLR Daily

Posted February 3rd, 2015 in appeals, covenants, landlord & tenant, law reports, repairs by tracey

Edwards v Kumarasamy; [2015] EWCA Civ 20; [2015] WLR (D) 40

‘A tenant was not required to give notice of a defect to a landlord for the latter to be liable under section 11(1A) of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 for injury or loss to the tenant resulting from the failure of the landlord to keep in repair any part of the building in which the landlord had an interest.’

WLR Daily, 28th January 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Unnoticed – NearlyLegal

Posted January 29th, 2015 in appeals, easements, housing, landlord & tenant, news, repairs by sally

‘Mr Edwards rented a second floor flat from Mr Kumarasamy. Mr K was the leaseholder of that flat, but did not own any other part of the property. Mr K’s lease granted him “the right to use on foot the entrance hall, lift and staircases giving access to the flat; the right to use an access road and parking space and the right to use the Bin Store (which is part of the Communal Areas as defined) and other facilities provided by the landlord. Regulations forming part of the lease in fact require all domestic rubbish to be placed in the Bin Store.”’

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NearlyLegal, 28th January 2015

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Judge allows hotel companies to reassign leases without losing benefit of associated guarantees – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 21st, 2015 in assignment, guarantees, hotels, landlord & tenant, leases, news, third parties by sally

‘A High Court judge has approved arrangements allowing companies within the Hilton group to reassign leases between themselves without the landlord losing the benefit of a guarantee granted by the parent company.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 20th January 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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Disrepair damages update – NearlyLegal

Posted January 21st, 2015 in damages, landlord & tenant, leases, legal aid, news, repairs by sally

‘Armes v Wheel Property Co Ltd, Clerkenwell and Shoreditch County Court, 17 May 2013
Claimant had been the protected tenant of a two bed flat in a Victorian terrace conversion for 30 years. Current rent was £191 per week.’

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NearlyLegal, 18th January 2015

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Private renters’ rights are stuck in the dark ages, Citizens Advice warns – The Guardian

‘Currently landlords obligated to repair fundamental fault in property – but can evict tenants if they pursue rights to repair.’

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The Guardian, 13th January 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Commercial property: dilapidations liability – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted January 12th, 2015 in damages, dilapidations, landlord & tenant, leases, news, repairs by sally

‘As the average lease length decreases, a review of dilapidations liability by the Court of Appeal is timely. Dilapidations are the repair works which have not been undertaken by the tenant, in breach of the terms of the lease.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 12th January 2015

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Hot, hot, hot – NearlyLegal

Posted January 12th, 2015 in appeals, benefits, housing, landlord & tenant, local government, news, tribunals by sally

‘Here is an interesting First Tier Tribunal bedroom tax appeal decision from Bexleyheath. [Decision notice]. It is a decision made after the Fife Upper Tribunal decision, but upholds the tenant’s appeal on the basis, in part, that the room is inadequately sized to be a bedroom, as well as being just too damn hot.’

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NearlyLegal, 11th January 2015

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Disabled tenants to challenge bedroom tax in supreme court – The Guardian

‘A legal case to be heard at the supreme court will decide whether the government’s housing benefit regulations – the bedroom tax – discriminates unfairly against disabled adults. The ruling could have consequences for hundreds of thousands of people.’

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The Guardian, 10th January 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Service Charge Disputes in the First Tier Tribunal – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted January 6th, 2015 in evidence, landlord & tenant, news, service charges, tribunals by sally

‘Over many years of representing landlords (usually by their appointed property management company) in leasehold service charge disputes before the Tribunals, various themes have developed. One of them is my frustration, in the majority of cases, at the quality of evidence with which I must present my client’s case. It actually isn’t that difficult to get your best evidence before the Tribunals and secure the best possible recovery. Especially with the benefit of hindsight!’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 17th December 2014

Source: www.hardwickec.co.uk

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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10 – NearlyLegal

‘This was a judicial review of LB Enfield’s plans for borough wide additional HMO licensing and selective licensing of all PRS properties. It did not go well for Enfield, who appear to have not quite grasped the consultation requirements.’

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NearlyLegal, 3rd January 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Ng and another v Charalambous and another – WLR Daily

Posted December 19th, 2014 in deposits, housing, landlord & tenant, law reports, repossession by sally

Ng and another v Charalambous and another [2014] EWCA Civ 1604; [2014] WLR (D) 540

‘Section 213 of the Housing Act 2004, as amended, which provided that any tenancy deposit paid to a person in connection with a shorthold tenancy in existence on 6 April 2012 had to be dealt with in accordance with an authorised scheme, was concerned not with the date at which the deposit was received but with the date on which the tenancy was in effect. Where such a deposit was not held in an authorised scheme, having been received before the relevant date, the sanctions for non-compliance in section 215(1) nevertheless applied so as to preclude the landlord from serving on the tenant a valid notice stating that possession was required under section 21 of the Housing Act 1988.’

WLR Daily, 16th December 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Suspending belief – Nearly Legal

Posted December 15th, 2014 in appeals, equity, land registration, landlord & tenant, mortgages, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘We have dealt with the basic facts in Scott v Southern Pacific Mortgages Ltd [2014] UKSC 52 when considering its previous incarnations (Cooke v Mortgage Business [2012] EWCA Civ 17 and Re North East Property Buyers Ltd [2010] EWHC 2991 (Ch)). In summary, the basic question for the Supreme Court was this: where a seller has agreed, prior to the contract of sale, that the buyer will grant the seller a tenancy after the sale, does the seller have that right so as not only to bind the buyer but also the buyer’s lender? I think, when framed as a question like that, the answer seems obvious. Call me a weak-kneed liberal, but all the equity (colloquially speaking) is in favour of the seller. They have entered in to the transaction on that basis and would not have entered in to the transaction otherwise. We all make bad deals which the law doesn’t get us out of, but the equity isn’t really in our favour: why should the law get us out of a bad deal?’

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Nearly Legal, 14th December 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Conscious Re-coupling and Succession – Nearly Legal

‘In R (Turley) v LB Wandsworth , the Claimant was the partner of the late Mr Doyle, who was the secure tenant of a property at Battersea Park Rd, London, SW8 from 1995 until his death on 17/3/2012. Mr D and Ms T had 4 children together and they lived at the property throughout, apart from a critically important period of separation between December 2010 and January 2012.

Ms T applied to succeed to the secure tenancy but the council decided that because she had not resided at the property for the 12 months immediately preceding Mr D’s death, she did not qualify to succeed. Ms T brought judicial review proceedings against that decision.’

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Nearly Legal, 14th December 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk/blog/

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