President’s Guidance on the International Child Abduction and Contact Unit (ICACU) and its role – Judiciary of England and Wales

‘Sir James Munby, President of the Family Division issued guidance on the International Child Abduction and Contact Unit on 10 November 2014.’

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Judiciary of England and Wales, 19th November 2014

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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EU court rules UK government must clean up dangerous air pollution – The Guardian

Posted November 20th, 2014 in EC law, environmental protection, news, pollution by tracey

‘The government will be forced to urgently clean up illegal air pollution in British cities following a ruling on Wednesday in the European court of justice. It is likely to see many diesel cars and heavy goods vehicles restricted from city centres within a few years.’

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The Guardian, 19th November 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Bankers’ bonus cap: UK to get signal in battle with EU – BBC News

Posted November 20th, 2014 in banking, EC law, news, remuneration by tracey

‘The UK government is due to receive an indication on whether its battle to overturn an EU law on bankers’ pay is likely to succeed. A legal adviser at the European Court of Justice will give his opinion of the government’s objections to the law.’

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BBC news, 19th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Software patents – the lines of communication are no clearer – Technology Law Update

Posted November 19th, 2014 in appeals, computer programs, EC law, news, patents by sally

‘Patents for computer programmes are not patentable in Europe. That seems like a simple statement. But a recent high level decision shows that it is far from simple to apply.’

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Technology Law Update, 18th November 2014

Source: www.technology-law-blog.co.uk

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L v M (R and another intervening) – WLR Daily

Posted November 18th, 2014 in children, custody, EC law, jurisdiction, law reports by sally

L v M (R and another intervening) (Case C-656/13) EU:C:2014:2364; [2014] WLR (D) 480

‘Article 12(3) of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 allowed, for the purposes of proceedings in matters of parental responsibility, the jurisdiction of a court of a member state which was not that of the child’s habitual residence to be established even where no other proceedings were pending before the court chosen. Article 12(3)(b) meant that it could not be considered that the jurisdiction of the court seised by one party of proceedings in matters of parental responsibility had been “accepted expressly or otherwise in an unequivocal manner by all the parties to the proceedings” where the defendant in those proceedings subsequently brought a second set of proceedings before the same court and, on taking the first step required of him in the first proceedings, pleaded the lack of jurisdiction of that court.’

WLR Daily, 12th November 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Dano v Jobcenter Leipzig – WLR Daily

Posted November 18th, 2014 in benefits, EC law, freedom of movement, law reports, social security by sally

Dano v Jobcenter Leipzig (Case C-333/13) EU:C:2014:2358; [2014] WLR (D) 477

‘Article 24(1) of Parliament and Council Directive 2004/38/EC, in conjunction with article 7(1)(b), and article 4 of Regulation No 883/2004 (as amended by Regulation No 1244/2010) allowed legislation of a member state under which nationals of other member states were excluded from entitlement to certain “special non-contributory cash benefits” within the meaning of article 70(2) of Regulation No 883/2004, although those benefits were granted to nationals of the host member state who were in the same situation, in so far as those nationals of other member states did not have a right of residence under Directive 2004/38 in the host member state.’

WLR Daily, 11th November 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Cartiera dell’Adda SpA v CEM Ambiente SpA – WLR Daily

Cartiera dell’Adda SpA v CEM Ambiente SpA (Case C-42/13) EU:C:2014:2345; [2014] WLR (D) 468

‘Article 45 of Parliament and Council Directive 2004/18/EC of 31 March 2004 on the co-ordination of procedures for the award of public works contracts, public supply contracts and public service contracts (as amended by Commission Regulation (EC) No 1177/2009 of 30 November 2009), read in conjunction with article 2 of the Directive, and the principle of equal treatment and the obligation of transparency did not preclude the exclusion of an economic operator from a procurement procedure on the ground that the operator had failed to comply with the requirement laid down in the contract documentation to annex to his bid, on pain of exclusion, a statement that the person designated as the operator’s technical director had not been the subject of criminal proceedings or a conviction, even where, at a date after the expiry of the deadline for submitting bids, such a statement had been provided to the contracting authority or it was shown that the person in question was identified as the technical director in error.’

WLR Daily, 6th November 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Österreichischer Gewerkschaftsbund v Verband Österreichischer Banken und Bankiers – WLR Daily

Posted November 18th, 2014 in children, collective agreements, EC law, law reports, part-time work by sally

Österreichischer Gewerkschaftsbund v Verband Österreichischer Banken und Bankiers (Case C-476/12) ECLI:EU:C:2014:2332; [2014] WLR (D) 467

‘The principle pro rata temporis applied to the calculation of the amount of a dependent child allowance paid by an employer to a part-time worker pursuant to a collective agreement pursuant to clause 4.2 of the Framework Agreement on part-time work.’

WLR Daily, 5th November 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Status: The Court of Appeal’s Decision in Halawi v World Duty Free [2014] EWCA CIV 1387 – Littleton Chambers

Posted November 17th, 2014 in appeals, EC law, employment, news, religious discrimination, substitution by sally

‘Fashions are a feature of so much in life, and employment law is no exception, where for the moment at least: Status is in vogue. In recent years the appellate courts have considered a range of relationships, and been asked to answer the question: what is the legal characterisation of the claimant’s relationship with the respondent? The question is put more specifically in each case; was the claimant an employee, a worker, an office holder, or truly self-employed as an independent provider of services? But this is merely to particularise the general question: what is the claimant’s status?’

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Littleton Chambers, 31st October 2014

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

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Colm O’Cinneide and Kate Malleson: Are quotas for judicial appointments lawful under EU law? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In April 2014 Sadiq Khan, Shadow Secretary of State for Justice, asked Karon Monaghan QC and Geoffrey Bindman QC to review the options for a future Labour Government to improve diversity in the judiciary. On November 6th their report, entitled “Judicial Diversity: Accelerating change”, was published. Starting from the premise that “[t]he near absence of women and Black, Asian and minority ethnic judges in the senior judiciary is no longer tolerable”, it proposes a range of recommendations designed to speed up the glacial pace of change. Perhaps the most controversial of these is for the introduction of a quota system for women and BAME candidates. The report reviews the use of quotas in other UK institutions as well as their use in judicial appointments processes around the world, before addressing the question of whether such quotas would be lawful under EU law. This is a key question: EU law casts a long shadow in this context, as the Monaghan and Bindman report makes clear, given that any legislation enacted in Westminster to give effect to a quota system in the process of judicial appointments must conform to the requirements of EU law.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 12th November 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Judges dismiss legal challenge to EU arrest warrant – BBC News

Posted November 17th, 2014 in EC law, extradition, judicial review, news, warrants by sally

‘A legal challenge to try to prevent the UK continuing to comply with the European Arrest Warrant has failed.’

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BBC News, 14th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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EU court moves against ‘benefits tourism’ in landmark ruling – The Independent

Posted November 12th, 2014 in benefits, EC law, immigration, news, taxation by tracey

‘The European Court of Justice has issued a historic ruling against Romanian woman living in Germany that could set a major precedent blocking so-called “benefits tourism” across the continent.’

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The Independent, 11th November 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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European Arrest Warrant: Judges urge UK support – BBC News

Posted November 6th, 2014 in EC law, extradition, judges, legal profession, news, warrants by sally

‘The UK risks becoming a “safe haven” for foreign criminals if it votes to opt out of the European Arrest Warrant (EAW) system, senior judges have said.’

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BBC News, 6th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Court of Appeal applies rare 19th century tort in granting injunction – RPC Privacy Blog

Posted November 5th, 2014 in appeals, EC law, injunctions, mental health, news, publishing by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has granted an injunction against the publication of a well-known performing artist’s book to protect the rights of his son, not on the basis of misuse of private information but because publication would be likely to cause psychological harm to the son.’

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RPC Privacy Blog, 4th November 2014

Source: www.rpc.co.uk

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Orphan Works Licensing – NIPC Law

Posted November 3rd, 2014 in artistic works, copyright, EC law, intellectual property, licensing, news by sally

‘One of the consequences of extending the term of copyright in many types of copyright has been a massive increase in the number of works in which copyright subsists whose owners cannot be identified or found. Such works are known as “orphan works” and HM government claims that there are some 91 million of them in the UK alone. Because their owners cannot be traced orphan works cannot lawfully be reproduced even for preservation. Consequently, works recorded on such media as celluloid film and magnetic tape may be lost for ever. Much of that work is culturally important and some of it is of considerable scientific interest such as patient records in studies of malaria. In Digital Opportunity: A Review of Intellectual Property and Growth Professor Hargreaves described the problem of orphan works as “the starkest failure of the copyright framework to adapt.”‘

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NIPC Law, 3rd November 2014

Source: www.nipclaw.blogspot.co.uk

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IPO launches new ‘orphan works’ licensing system – OUT-LAW.com

Posted November 3rd, 2014 in artistic works, copyright, EC law, intellectual property, licensing, news by sally

‘Businesses wishing to make use of copyrighted works that have no known rights holder can now obtain a licence allowing them to use the material without infringing UK copyright laws under a new licensing system launched by the Intellectual Property Office (IPO).’

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OUT-LAW.com, 31st October 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Modern slavery bill is ‘lost opportunity’, says human trafficking adviser – The Guardian

‘The government’s modern slavery bill is a “lost opportunity,” the home secretary’s former special envoy for human trafficking has warned. Anthony Steen, who advised on the legislation and chairs the Human Trafficking Foundation, said the bill, which will be debated in parliament on Tuesday for its third reading, had “yawning gaps”, and failed to focus on the needs of victims of trafficking in the UK.’

Full story

The Guardian, 3rd November 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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High Court tests the limits of confidentiality in EC infringement decisions – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

Posted October 30th, 2014 in airlines, confidentiality, disclosure, EC law, judgments, news, price fixing by sally

‘The European Commission came in for some stern criticism from the High Court this week, in a case which looks set to test the boundaries of confidentiality in EC infringement decisions: see Emerald Supplies v BA [2014] EWHC 3515 (Ch).’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 30th October 2014

Source: www.competitionbulletin.com

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Haeger & Schmidt GmbH v Mutuelles du Mans assurances IARD (MMA IARD) and others – WLR Daily

Posted October 28th, 2014 in carriage of goods, conflict of laws, EC law, law reports, treaties by sally

Haeger & Schmidt GmbH v Mutuelles du Mans assurances IARD (MMA IARD) and others (Case C-305/13) ECLI:EU:C:2014:2320; [2014] WLR (D) 441

‘The last sentence of article 4(4) of the Convention on the Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations (Rome Convention) applied to a commission contract for the carriage of goods solely when the main purpose of the contract consisted in the actual transport of the goods concerned, which was for the referring court to verify. Where the law applicable to a contract for the carriage of goods could not be fixed under the second sentence of article 4(4), it had to be determined in accordance with the general rule laid down in article 4(1) that the law governing the contract was that of the country with which it was most closely connected. Where it was argued that a contract had a closer connection with a country other than that the law of which was designated by the presumption laid down in article 4(2), the national court had to compare the connections existing between that contract and the country whose law was designated by the presumption and the other country concerned. In so doing, the national court had to take account of the circumstances as a whole, including the existence of other contracts connected with the contract in question.’

WLR Daily, 23rd October 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Flos putting us all through the Mill – NIPC Law

Posted October 22nd, 2014 in copyright, EC law, intellectual property, Italy, news by sally

‘In 1962 Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni designed a floor lamp with a marble base and a curved lead to a bowl shaped reflector. Those lamps, known as the Arco lamp and you can see a picture of one of those lamps in Achille Castiglioni’s studio in Quick History: The Arco Lamp in Apartment Therapy. Original Arco lamps retail for £1,373 but it is possible to buy a reproduction for a fraction of that price as the Prime Minister’s wife did recently (see “Samantha Cameron counts the cost of her repro lamp” 3 Oct 2011 The Guardian).’

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NIPC Law, 17th October 2014

Source: www.nipclaw.blogspot.co.uk

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