Landlords win appeals over “unfair” FTT proceedings where – in absence of hearing – criminal offences found to have been committed – Local Government Lawyer

‘Three private landlords have won appeals at the Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) over whether the criminal standard of proof was met in rent disputes at the First Tier Tribunal (FTT).’

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Local Government Lawyer, 25th February 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Reflections on Maughan: disclosure in inquests – Henderson Chambers

‘Inquests are not adversarial proceedings. However, the Supreme Court decision in Maughan (lowering the standard of proof for an inquest conclusion of ‘unlawful killing’ to the balance of probabilities) has left practitioners concerned about the ability of the coronial process to protect Interested Persons (“IPs”) from the serious reputational damage such a conclusion will inevitably cause. This article looks at one critical part of the process, namely disclosure.’

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Henderson Chambers, 19th January 2021

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Standard of Proof and the Chief Coroner’s Law Sheet No.6 – Maughan and Beyond – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘On 13th January 2021, the new Chief Coroner, HHJ Teague QC, published Law Sheet No.6. This new guidance comes exactly two months after the Supreme Court gave judgment on 13th November 2020 in the case of R (on the application of Thomas Maughan) v. HM Senior Coroner for Oxfordshire [2020] UKSC 46 where it ruled by majority that all conclusions in coronial inquests, whether short form or narrative, are to be determined on the civil standard of proof: the balance of probabilities.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 19th January 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Legal Professional Privilege: Breach of a Company Director’s Duties and the Iniquity Exception in Practice – Exchange Chambers

‘LPP has been described as “a fundamental condition on which the administration of justice as a whole rests” (R v Derby Magistrates’ Court, Ex p B [1996] AC 487, 507). In the last few years there has been a significant amount of litigation relating to documents subject to LPP (see for instance Sports Direct International plc v Financial Reporting Council [2020] EWCA Civ 177 and Addlesee v Dentons Europe LLP [2019] EWCA Civ 1600). This is perhaps not surprising given how valuable and sensitive such documents will be in any litigation or investigation by a regulator. Each of these cases tests the boundaries of LPP. The recent decision of Tom Leech QC sitting as a judge of the High Court in Barrowfen is one such decision and particularly important for those who advise directors or are bringing or defending a claim against directors. Barrowfen is an important decision on the iniquity exception in the context of allegations of breaches by a director of his statutory duties under the Companies Act 2006.’

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Exchange Chambers, 4th January 2021

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

A duty of care – what does the new standard of proof in inquests mean? – 5SAH

‘On the 11th of July 2016 a prisoner Mr James Maughan was found dead in his prison cell having hanged himself. The investigation into the factual circumstances surrounding his death found that he had a history of mental health issues and had previously made threats of self-harm. The evening before his death he had been in an agitated state.’

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5SAH, 7th January 2021

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Suicide and the burden of proof – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted December 1st, 2020 in burden of proof, coroners, inquests, news, standard of proof, suicide by sally

‘Although suicide was decriminalised more than 60 years ago, it was still always necessary to meet the criminal standard of proof when reaching a finding that someone had taken their own life. But this month, in a departure from this common understanding, the Supreme Court in R (Maughan) v HM Coroner for Oxfordshire [2020] UKSC 46 found that the ‘degree of conclusivity’ required was, in fact, the civil standard – the balance of probabilities.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 30th November 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Supreme Court reduces standard of proof for suicide and unlawful killing in inquest conclusions – Park Square Barristers

‘The Supreme Court has on 13 November 2020 handed down the judgment in this case concerning the appropriate standard of proof for conclusions at inquests.’

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Park Square Barristers, 13th November 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

More Likely Than Not: The Civil Standard of Proof Applies to All Short-Form and Narrative Conclusions at Inquests – Ropewalk Chambers

Posted November 19th, 2020 in coroners, inquests, news, standard of proof, suicide, Supreme Court, verdicts by sally

‘By a majority of three to two, the Supreme Court has held that the standard of proof for findings of suicide and unlawful killing at an inquest is the balance of probabilities: R (Maughan) v Her Majesty’s Senior Coroner for Oxfordshire [2020]
UKSC 46.’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 16th November 2020

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Supreme Court lowers standard of proof for inquests – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted November 17th, 2020 in coroners, inquests, news, standard of proof, suicide, Supreme Court, verdicts by sally

‘The Supreme Court has today lowered the standard of proof for all conclusions in inquest proceedings, including unlawful killing and suicide, in a decision that could have wide-reaching implications for the recording of deaths in England and Wales.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 13th November 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

New Judgment: R (on the application of Maughan) v Her Majesty’s Senior Coroner for Oxfordshire [2020] UKSC 46 – UKSC Blog

‘By a majority the Supreme Court has dismissed this appeal concerning the standard of proof, or degree of conclusivity, required for the determination of the result of an inquest into a death where the question is whether the deceased committed suicide.’

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UKSC Blog, 13th November 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Maughan: Suicide and Unlawful Killing Conclusions in Inquests – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Supreme Court has now issued its judgment in this important case for Coroners and inquests dealing with the standard of proof to be applied where the death might have been caused by suicide or unlawful killing.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 13th November 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Use of force by police: what is the standard for determining misconduct? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal has delivered a judgment in R (Officer W80) v Director General of the Independent Officer for Police Conduct [2020] EWCA Civ 1301 regarding the applicable conduct standard and provisions governing police in cases of use of force.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 28th October 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Rapper Ceon Broughton wins appeal against manslaughter conviction following festival death of Louella Fletcher-Michie – Garden Court Chambers

‘Ceon Broughton, a rapper jailed over the death of his partner Louella Fletcher-Michie from a drug overdose at Bestival has won his appeal against his manslaughter conviction. Broughton’s conviction in 2019 and seven-year prison sentence for manslaughter was quashed on 18 August 2020 by the Court of Appeal. The appeal was heard before The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales Lord Burnett, Mr Justice Sweeney and Mr Justice Murray.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 18th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

‘Lawful object’ – Section 4(1) of the Explosive Substances Act 1883 – KCH Garden Sq

‘On the 11 March 2020 the Supreme Court gave their judgment in the case of R v Copeland [2020] UKSC 8. This case concerned the interpretation of the Explosive Substances Act 1883 (‘the Act’), section 4(1). This provides that anyone who makes or has in their possession explosive substances is liable to prosecution unless they can show it was ‘for a lawful object’. Specifically, the Court considered the meaning of what constituted ‘a lawful object’ and the case is likely to be of some interest to those involved in counter-terrorism matters.’

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KCH Garden Sq, August 2020

Source: kchgardensquare.co.uk

Court overturns man’s conviction for girlfriend’s Bestival drug death – The Guardian

‘The rapper Ceon Broughton has had his conviction for the manslaughter of his girlfriend overturned by the court of appeal.’

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The Guardian, 18th August 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Depp libel trial reveals problems of proof in domestic violence cases – The Guardian

‘Despite being a libel case, Depp v News Group Newspapers Ltd & Another felt more like a criminal trial at the Old Bailey, or a domestic violence hearing in the family courts.’

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The Guardian, 28th July 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Case Comment: Sainsbury’s Supermarkets Ltd v Visa Europe Services LLC and others [2020] UKSC 24 – UKSC Blog

‘In this case comment, David Bridge, Kenny Henderson, Jessica Foley, Devina Shah and Imtiyaz Chowdhury who all work within the Dispute Resolution team at CMS, comment on the decision handed down earlier this month by the UK Supreme Court in this matter of Sainsbury’s Supermarkets Ltd v Visa Europe Services LLC and others [2020] UKSC 24.’

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UKSC Blog, 30th June 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Rights & Wrongs? Standard of proof in dishonesty cases considered by the Court of Appeal – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted May 12th, 2020 in banking, conspiracy, fraud, illegality, news, standard of proof by sally

‘The standard of proof in dishonesty cases: simple to state, difficult to apply. In Bank St Petersburg PJSC v Arkhangelsky [2020] EWCA Civ 408 the difficulty led the Court of Appeal to reverse an experienced High Court judge’s dismissal of a counterclaim. The matter was remitted after a 46 day trial spread over 6 months in 2016, 22 months waiting for a 388 page judgment and nearly 2 years waiting for the Court of Appeal decision on 18 March 2020. Jack Dillon and Amy Held consider the implications.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 10th May 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Case Preview: R (Maughan) v Her Majesty’s Senior Coroner for Oxfordshire – UKSC Blog

‘This case concerns the standard of proof applicable in inquest proceedings in cases of alleged suicide. It raises important and fundamental questions concerning the conduct of inquests, and will be of particular significance to bereaved families where the deceased is alleged to have committed suicide while in the care or custody of the state. The Supreme Court may also consider the position in relation to findings of unlawful killing.’

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UKSC Blog, 7th February 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Green light for civil standard of proof at SDT – Legal Futures

‘The Legal Services Board (LSB) has approved the change in the standard of proof used by the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) to the civil standard.’

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Legal Futures, 29th July 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk