Judge refuses to withdraw Julian Assange arrest warrant – The Guardian

Posted February 14th, 2018 in bail, embassies, news, public interest, sexual offences, warrants by michael

“Handing down her judgment at Westminster magistrates court, the senior district judge Emma Arbuthnot said she was not persuaded by the argument from Assange’s legal team that it was not in the public interest to pursue him for skipping bail.”

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The Guardian, 13th February 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Britain rejects request to grant Julian Assange diplomatic status amid reports of Ecuadorean citizenship – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 11th, 2018 in asylum, citizenship, diplomats, embassies, extradition, news by tracey

‘The Foreign Office turned down a request from the Ecuadorian government to grant Julian Assange diplomatic status, amid reports the WikiLeaks founder may have received citizenship from the Andean country.’

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Daily Telegraph, 11th January 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Welsh woman ‘imprisoned by father’ for ‘kissing a guy’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted July 28th, 2016 in embassies, false imprisonment, foreign jurisdictions, human rights, news by tracey

‘A 21-year-old Welsh woman who says she has been imprisoned by her father in Saudi Arabia because she “kissed a guy” has asked a British High Court judge for help.’

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Daily Telegraph, 28th July 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Julian Assange: UN panel calls on UK and Sweden to end ‘arbitrary detention’ and compensate WikiLeaks founder – The Independent

Posted February 5th, 2016 in detention, embassies, extradition, freedom of movement, news, United Nations by tracey

‘Julian Assange must be freed from “arbitrary detention” by the UK and Sweden, the United Nations has ruled.’

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The Independent, 5th February 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Julian Assange: Scotland Yard ends 24-hour guard on Ecuadorian embassy – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 13th, 2015 in costs, embassies, extradition, news, police, proportionality by tracey

‘Police officers have stopped guarding the embassy in London where the Wikileaks founder took refuge, saying it is no longer “proportionate.” ‘

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Daily Telegraph, 12th October 2015

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Benkharbouche v Embassy of the Republic of Sudan (Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and others intervening); Janah v Libya (Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and others intervening) – WLR Daily

Benkharbouche v Embassy of the Republic of Sudan (Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and others intervening); Janah v Libya (Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and others intervening) [2015] EWCA Civ 33; [2015] WLR (D) 83

‘Domestic workers employed as members of the service staff of foreign diplomatic missions in the United Kingdom were entitled to bring proceedings asserting their employment rights against the employer state, in claims including unfair dismissal and breach of working time provisions, and such claims were not barred by the doctrine of state immunity pursuant to provisions in the State Immunity Act 1978.’

WLR Daily, 5th February 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Court of Appeal strikes down state immunity rules that prevent embassy employees seeking justice – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted February 16th, 2015 in appeals, EC law, embassies, employment, human rights, immunity, news by sally

‘This judgment concerned the conjoined appeals of Ms. Benkharbouche and Ms. Janah which arose from employment law claims brought against, respectively, the Sudanese and Libyan embassies. Certain of their claims, such as those for unfair dismissal, were founded on domestic law. Others, such as those under the Working Time Regulations 1998, fell within the scope of EU law. All were met with pleas of state immunity under the State Immunity Act 1978.’

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UK Human Rights Blog,

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Regina (Tajik) v City of Westminster Magistrates’ Court and another – WLR Daily

Posted December 5th, 2012 in appeals, delay, diplomats, embassies, extradition, human rights, law reports, time limits by sally

Regina (Tajik) v City of Westminster Magistrates’ Court and another [2012] EWHC 3347 (Admin); [2012] WLR (D) 361

“While there was nothing in section 118 of the Extradition Act 2003 to delay its operation pending the Secretary of State’s consideration of medical evidence after the conclusion of extradition statutory process, continued extra-statutory consideration of a case by the Secretary of State could be valid subject to the court’s judgment as to whether reasonable cause had been shown for delay following the conclusion of the appeal process.”

WLR Daily, 27th November 2012

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

British judges refuse to extradite former Iranian diplomat to US – Daily Telegraph

Posted November 28th, 2012 in delay, diplomats, embassies, extradition, Iran, news by sally

“A former high-ranking Iranian diplomat has won a High Court battle in his attempt to avoid extradition to the US.”

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Daily Telegraph, 27th November 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Lawcast 219: Carl Gardner on the Assange asylum issues – Charon QC

Posted August 20th, 2012 in asylum, embassies, extradition, podcasts, sexual offences, warrants by sally

“Today I am talking to Carl Gardner, ex government lawyer and author of The Head of Legal blog, about the Assange Asylum issue.”

Podcast

Charon QC, 17th August 2012

Source: www.charonqc.wordpress.com

“Charon QC” is the blogging pseudonym of Mike Semple Piggot, editor of insitelaw newswire.

Can police enter an embassy? A guide – The Guardian

Posted August 17th, 2012 in asylum, embassies, extradition, international law, news, police by sally

“The Foreign Office says it can revoke an embassy’s diplomatic status but Ecuador claims this is only if there is a public threat.”

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The Guardian, 16th August 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Julian Assange: can the UK withdraw diplomatic status from the Ecuadorian embassy? – Head of Legal

Posted August 16th, 2012 in asylum, embassies, extradition, news by sally

“The latest twist in the Julian Assange case, as we await Ecuador’s decision on granting him asylum (a decision which would not, as I’ve written before, in itself allow protection from arrest if he steps outside the embassy), is that people are wondering whether the UK can simply strip the embassy of its diplomatic status, so allowing police officers to enter it.”

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Head of Legal, 15th August 2012

Source: www.headoflegal.com