You don’t just walk away – NearlyLegal

Posted April 22nd, 2014 in costs, housing, landlord & tenant, leases, news, tribunals by sally

‘R (Twelve Baytree Ltd) v Rent Assessment Committee [2014] EWHC 1129 (Admin) is that rare beast – a judicial review of the LVT (as it was; FTT(PC) as it is now). It concerns how you withdraw a Right to Manage claim. I confess, when I first heard about this case, I had thought it would be more interesting than it has turned out to be.’

Full story

NearlyLegal, 20th April 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Comments Off

Fiddler under the roof – NearlyLegal

Posted April 22nd, 2014 in appeals, damages, housing, injunctions, leases, news by sally

‘A Court of Appeal case on the problems with the edges of demises and reserved rights of access, involving, in this case, a land grab above a ceiling and a demand to access the flat above.’

Full story

NearlyLegal, 20th April 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Comments Off

Supreme Court to hear case on EU migrants and temporary inability to work – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Supreme Court has agreed to hear an EU national’s appeal over a ruling that he was not eligible for housing assistance from a local authority as his inability to work was not temporary.’

Full story

Local Government Lawyer, 14th April 2014

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Comments Off

Eve’s Law: addresses of domestic violence victims must be kept secret – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘In busy working environments it is easy to make mistakes but some mistakes are more costly than others. An inadvertent disclosure of a domestic violence victim’s safe address to their abuser, for instance, could cost someone their life. Now signed by 87 MPs, Early Day Motion 900 so called “Eve’s Law” is calling for the greater protection of safe addresses.’

Full story

Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 14th April 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

Comments Off

Disrepair – counterclaims after possession order – NearlyLegal

Posted April 10th, 2014 in appeals, civil procedure rules, housing, news, repossession, setting aside by sally

‘Conventionally, we’ve thought that a counterclaim would have to be raised before a possession order, or the complex and fraught option of applying to set aside the possession order would have to be followed, even assuming there was actually any basis for such an application. But there appears to be a solid argument based on Court of Appeal precedent to suggest otherwise.’

Full story

NearlyLegal, 9th April 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Comments Off

Room for manoeuvre – Hardwicke Chambers

‘In R (on the application of MA & Ors) v The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (Respondent) and The Equality and Human Rights Commission (Intervener) [2014] EWCA 13 the Court of Appeal has rejected appeals against the dismissal of claims for a judicial review of the so-called “bedroom tax”, bringing to an end – for the time being at least – months of speculation about the lawfulness of arguably the most controversial aspect of the Government’s welfare reform programme.’

Full story

Hardwicke Chambers, 12th March 2014

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Comments Off

Article 8 – A chink in the landlord’s armour? A look at Southend on Sea BC v Armour – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted April 8th, 2014 in appeals, ASBOs, housing, local government, news, repossession by sally

‘Mr Armour lived with his 14 year old daughter in a flat owned by Southend under an introductory tenancy. Mr Armour was accused of anti-social behaviour, including verbally abusing neighbours and contractors, and turning on the electricity when contractors were working causing one to suffer an electric shock.’

Full story

Hardwicke Chambers, 13th March 2014

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Comments Off

Not adding up – NearlyLegal

Posted April 8th, 2014 in appeals, homelessness, housing, local government, news, rent by sally

‘As the number of people becoming homeless from private sector accommodation continues to rise, and as private sector accommodation is used for discharge of duty and temporary accommodation by Councils, the issue of affordability becomes more and more important. Both intentional homeless decisions and suitability decisions can rest on affordability.’

Full story

NearlyLegal, 7th April 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Comments Off

Court of Appeal upholds quashing of Arsenal tower permission – OUT-LAW.com

Posted April 2nd, 2014 in appeals, housing, local government, news, planning by sally

‘A High Court decision to quash planning permission for a 25-storey student tower near Arsenal’s football stadium in north London’s Upper Holloway has been upheld in the Court of Appeal.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 1st April 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

Comments Off

Deprivation of liberty – time to rip up the DOLS regime and start again – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘The dust is now beginning to settle, slightly, after the earthquake that was the decision of the Supreme Court in the conjoined appeals of Cheshire West and P and Q, which extends the criteria for determining whether living arrangements made for mentally incapacitated individuals amount to a deprivation of liberty.’

Full story

Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 25th March 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

Comments Off

Planning Practice Guidance: An Overview – No. 5 Chambers

Posted March 26th, 2014 in environmental protection, housing, local government, news, planning by sally

‘On 6 March Nick Boles announced the launch of the new Planning Practice Guidance (‘PPG’). The guidance has been in draft ‘Beta’ format since 28 August 2013. It follows a review of planning policy guidance undertaken by Lord Taylor of Goss Moor which began in October 2012. This note is intended to provide a brief overview of the guidance and some of its key features.’

Full story

No. 5 Chambers, 10th March 2014

Source: www.no5.com

Comments Off

Supreme Court set to hear latest in series of village green cases – Local Government Lawyer

Posted March 26th, 2014 in appeals, commons, housing, local government, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The latest in a series of village green cases to reach the Supreme Court will be heard next week by a five-judge panel led by Lord Neuberger.’

Full story

Local Government Lawyer, 25th March 2014

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Comments Off

P (by his litigation friend the Official Solicitor) (Appellant) v Cheshire West and Chester Council and another (Respondents); P and Q (by their litigation friend, the Official Solicitor) (Appellants) v Surrey County Council (Respondent) – Supreme Court

P (by his litigation friend the Official Solicitor) (Appellant) v Cheshire West and Chester Council and another (Respondents); P and Q (by their litigation friend, the Official Solicitor) (Appellants) v Surrey County Council (Respondent) [2014] UKSC 19 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 19th March 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

Comments Off

Surrey County Council v P and others (Equality and Human Rights Commission and others intervening); Cheshire West and Chester Council v P and another (Same intervening) – WLR Daily

Surrey County Council v P and others (Equality and Human Rights Commission and others intervening); Cheshire West and Chester Council v P and another (Same intervening) [2014] UKSC 19; [2014] WLR (D) 140

‘Mentally incapacitated persons had the same rights to liberty as everyone else, and if their living arrangements would amount to a deprivation of liberty of a capacitous person they were also a deprivation of liberty of the incapacitated person, who was therefore entitled to periodic independent checks to ensure that the deprivation of liberty remained justified in his or her best interests.’

WLR Daily, 19th March 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Comments Off

Deprivation of Liberty Defined by the Supreme Court: a difference of views concerning deprivation of liberty of disabled persons – Garden Court Chambers Blog

‘Tim Baldwin comments on today’s Supreme Court judgment regarding the deprivation of liberty of people with disabilities.

This note concerns the case of P (by his litigation friend the Official Solicitor) (Appellant) v Cheshire West and Chester Council and another (Respondents); P and Q (by their litigation friend, the Official Solicitor)(Appellants) v Surrey County Council (Respondent) [2014] UKSC 19 handed down on the 19 March 2014.’

Full story

Garden Court Chambers Blog, 19th March 2014

Source: www.gclaw.wordpress.com

Comments Off

Room use and Uratemp – NearlyLegal

Posted March 18th, 2014 in appeals, benefits, disabled persons, housing, news, social security by tracey

‘A successful FTT bedroom tax appeal in Birkenhead has raised some new questions over ‘room use’ as an argument.’

Full story

NearlyLegal, 17th March 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Comments Off

Why the human rights challenge to the ‘bedroom tax’ failed – Garden Court Chambers Blog

Posted March 18th, 2014 in appeals, benefits, disabled persons, housing, human rights, news, social security by tracey

‘Desmond Rutledge examines why the Court of Appeal in MA and Others refused to apply the reasoning in Burnip to disabled adults in the social sector who need an extra bedroom.’

Full story

Garden Court Chambers, 17th March 2014

Source: www.gclaw.wordpress.com

Comments Off

Chancel repair liability: The ancient law that could hit house prices – BBC News

Posted March 13th, 2014 in Church of England, housing, news, repairs by tracey

‘An ancient law which can force homeowners to pay for their local church’s repairs is blighting properties and depressing house sales, say campaigners. But what is chancel repair liability and what is the best way to deal with it?.’

Full story

BBC News, 13th March 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off

Regina (Alansi) v Newham London Borough Council – WLR Daily

Regina (Alansi) v Newham London Borough Council: [2013] EWHC 3722 (Admin);   [2014] WLR (D)  117

‘The court’s approach to the interpretation of statements made by public bodies that were said to give rise to a legitimate expectation required it, inter alia, to ascertain the meaning which the authority’s statements would reasonably convey to the claimant in the light of all the background knowledge which he/she had in the situation in which she was at the time that the statements were made.’

WLR Daily, 27th November 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Comments Off

Mohamoud v Birmingham City Council – WLR Daily

Posted March 12th, 2014 in appeals, homelessness, housing, law reports, local government, statutory duty by tracey

Mohamoud v Birmingham City Council: [2014] EWCA Civ 227;   [2014] WLR (D)  119

‘The principle that a person conducting a review of a local housing authority’s decision as to what (if any) duty to provide accommodation it owed under section 193 of the Housing Act 1996 to an applicant could look at new matters to determine whether there was a “deficiency” in the decision for the purposes of regulation 8(2) of the Allocation of Housing and Homelessness (Review Procedures) Regulations 1999 was not confined to points which the applicant could not have taken at the outset.’

WLR Daily, 7th March 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Comments Off