Kidney failure patient forced to have dialysis – Daily Telegraph

“The man, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, had resisted dialysis and doctors believe that without it he will die within weeks. Managers at the hospital where he is being treated applied to the Court of Protection for legal permission to use proportionate restraint, if necessary, to force him to have the life saving treatment.”

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Daiy Telegraph, 29th May 2012

Source: www.telegrpah.co.uk

Doctors could be struck off for refusing to give unmarried women contraceptives – Daily Telegraph

“Doctors who refuse to give contraceptives to unmarried women or carry out sex change operations face being struck off under new guidelines.”

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Daily Telegraph, 23rd May 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

‘Living wills’ need to be completely clear, rules judge – Daily Telegraph

Posted May 2nd, 2012 in assisted suicide, Court of Protection, medical ethics, news, wills by sally

“‘Living wills’ that stipulate exactly how a person wants to die should be drawn up with absolute clarity, a judge has ruled after concluding a 67-year-old man with motor neurone disease had made a ‘valid decision’ to refuse treatment.”

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Daily Telegraph, 1st May 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Why the Abortion Act deserves to live – The Guardian

Posted April 11th, 2012 in abortion, medical ethics, news by sally

“The 1967 Act is a delicate compromise that has survived nearly half a century.”

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The Guardian, 10th April 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

X-ray trial on asylum seekers started without formal approval – The Guardian

Posted April 10th, 2012 in asylum, children, medical ethics, news by sally

“The UK Border Agency embarked on a controversial trial of using dental x-rays to establish the age of young asylum seekers without the formal approval of the NHS watchdog which ensures medical research is ethical, the Guardian can reveal.”

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The Guardian, 5th April 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

DNAR orders can be medico-legally lethal – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted December 15th, 2011 in hospital orders, medical ethics, news by sally

“Do not attempt resuscitation orders (DNAR orders), have been much in the news. There is concern about them being slapped on patients’ notes without adequate, or any, consultation with the patient or, if the patient is incapacitate, with the relatives or carers.”

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 14th December 2011

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

‘M’ and the law: a difficult case heard in the right court – The Guardian

Posted September 30th, 2011 in Court of Protection, euthanasia, medical ethics, medical treatment, news by tracey

“A brain-damaged woman’s family didn’t get the judgment it wanted, but in the past it was more painful for such cases even to be brought.”

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The Guardian, 29th September 2011

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Brain-damaged woman should not be allowed to die, high court rules – The Guardian

Posted September 28th, 2011 in euthanasia, families, medical ethics, medical treatment, news by sally

“A brain-damaged, minimally-conscious woman should not be allowed to die, a high court judge has ruled.”

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The Guardian, 28th September 2011

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Scientists credited on ghostwritten articles ‘should be charged with fraud’ – The Guardian

Posted August 3rd, 2011 in doctors, fraud, medical ethics, medical treatment, news, professional conduct by sally

“Doctors and scientists who put their names to medical articles they have not written should be charged with professional misconduct and fraud, according to legal experts.”

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The Guardian, 2nd August 2011

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Stem cell treatments threatened by European patents ruling – The Guardian

Posted April 28th, 2011 in EC law, embryology, medical ethics, medical treatment, news, patents by sally

“Work on revolutionary medical treatments for incurable diseases is in danger of being wiped out by a European court ruling on embryonic stem cells, according to leading scientists.”

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The Guardian, 27th April 2011

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

GPs agree to waive privacy of mentally ill gun owners – The Guardian

Posted June 15th, 2010 in confidentiality, doctors, firearms, medical ethics, mental health, news by sally

“Doctors have agreed to breach their duty of medical confidentiality to patients who own guns if they fear they have become so seriously mentally ill they may use their weapons on themselves or the public, the Guardian has learned.”

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The Guardian, 14th June 2010

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Leading article: Hard cases and good law – The Independent

Posted November 11th, 2009 in children, hospitals, medical ethics, medical treatment, news by sally

“The sad case of Baby RB, which has been argued to and fro before the High Court, ended summarily yesterday when the one-year-old boy’s father accepted the hospital’s case for withdrawing life support. This unexpected development had two immediate effects. The doctors are now within their rights to halt life support, so as to allow the severely disabled child – as the hospital put it – ‘a peaceful, calm and dignified death’. And the judge will not have to reach a decision – although he hinted what it would have been when he said that the outcome was, in his view, ‘inevitable’.”

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The Independent, 11th November 2009

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Medical law too often doffs its cap to the doctor’s white coat – The Times

Posted May 21st, 2009 in medical ethics, medical treatment, news by sally

“‘It’s up to you what you do with your own body,’ goes the rhetoric. But when you dive away from abstractions into the real world of suffering and desire, things are not so simple.”

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The Times, 21st May 2009

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

Should the Court of Appeal allow Katie Thorpe’s womb to be removed? – The Times

Posted October 18th, 2007 in disabled persons, medical ethics, news by sally

“A mother’s wish to have her disabled teenage daughter’s womb removed looks set to become the next landmark case in the courts to test the ethics of medical intervention where patients cannot decide for themselves.”

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The Times, 18th October 2007

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

Surgeons begin training on cadavers – The Times

Posted October 17th, 2007 in doctors, medical ethics, news by sally

“A change in the law is to transform the way surgeons are trained, allowing them to practise on bodies left to medical science. Under the Anatomy Act, cadavers could be used for tuition in anatomy but not in technique.”

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The Times, 17th October 2007

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk

Mother wants disabled girl to have hysterectomy “to give her a better life” – The Times

Posted October 8th, 2007 in disabled persons, medical ethics, news by sally

“A severely disabled teenager’s womb may be removed to improve her quality of life, and not because it is medically necessary, in what is thought to be a British first which has reignited debate over medical ethics.”

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The Times, 8th October 2007

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk