Do Medical Practitioners have a duty to disclose Genetic Disorders despite the Principles of Confidentiality? – Exchange Chambers

‘An analysis of the ethical and legal considerations underpinning a decision to inform a patient’s relatives about a diagnosis of a genetic disorder in light of the recent judgment handed down in ABC v St Georges Healthcare and Others [2020] EWHC 455 (QB).’

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Exchange Chambers, 25th March 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Directors disqualified after abandoning care homes, diverting council funds – Local Government Lawyer

‘The directors of two care homes in the Midlands have been disqualified after they diverted council funds before abandoning elderly residents and staff, the Insolvency Services has revealed.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 31st March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Coronavirus and detention under the Mental Health Act – Doughty Street Chambers

‘The Coronavirus Act 2020 (CA 2020) has now been passed. However not all the provisions have yet come into force. Many of the provisions (including the amendments to the Mental Health Act 1983 (MHA) and to the Care Act 2014) will come into force on a day appointed by a Minister according to regulations. Once in force, a part of the Act could also be suspended and revived. For further details on this, see our earlier post here.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 30th March 2020

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

In-house lawyer facilitated sham £16m property schemes – Legal Futures

‘A solicitor who acted as head of legal and a “puppet director” for a variety of companies involved in sham £16m property schemes has been struck off.’

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Legal Futures, 1st April 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The choice of experts in Catastrophic and Severe Brain Injury – Exchange Chambers

‘In this article I will examine the issues surrounding the choice of experts in catastrophic brain injury claims. I will write about what experts are reasonably required and in what order the experts should be instructed. We will look at the various expertise available and just what it is they do and how they can help the Court to resolve the issues.’

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Exchange Chambers, 25th March 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Council to appeal High Court ruling that stroke unit reconfiguration was lawful – Law Society Gazette

Posted April 1st, 2020 in appeals, equality, health, hospitals, local government, news by sally

‘Medway Council has lodged an appeal against a High Court decision which found that a joint committee of clinical commissioning groups had acted lawfully when dealing with health inequalities when they decided the locations of three hyper acute stroke units (HASUs) in Kent.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 31st March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Lawyers echo Sumption’s ‘police state’ warning – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Criticism by former Supreme Court justice Lord Sumption of apparent over-reach by police officers enforcing Covid-19 lockdown restrictions appears to have struck a chord in the legal profession.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 31st March 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Government acted unlawfully in sharing information that could lead to death penalty, rules UK Supreme Court – Garden Court Chambers

‘The UK Supreme Court today ruled that the British Government acted unlawfully in a case where it departed from the UK’s longstanding policy on opposing the death penalty in all circumstances.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 25th March 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

The quickly mutating Coronavirus legislation – drafting anomalies and police powers – UK Police Law Blog

‘The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Business Closure) (England) Regulations 2020 at reg 6(1) create a prohibition against leaving one’s home without reasonable excuse rather than being outside one’s home without reasonable excuse. Not only is that narrower than many people had thought, it shapes the powers of a police constable to direct or remove people to their home, which depends upon the constable considering that they have breached reg 6(1). Furthermore, in criminal proceedings for a breach, it may be that the burden of establishing of the defence of reasonable excuse is on a defendant in Scotland but on the prosecution in the other three home nations.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 31st March 2020

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Expert Evidence: A Cautionary Tale – Exchange Chambers

‘On 3rd March 2020, Robert Buckland, the incumbent Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, confirmed that electronic signatures are permissible and legally valid if used in commercial and consumer documents. This declaration followed a Law Commission report, published in September last year, that looked at the electronic execution of documents, including deeds.’

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Exchange Chambers, 25th March 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Privately educated lawyers dominate corporate work – Legal Futures

‘The proportion of solicitors who attended state schools is creeping upwards, but those who went to fee-paying schools dominate corporate work, according to the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA).’

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Legal Futures, 31st March 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Check your Email Signatures! – Falcon Chambers

‘As every property practitioner knows, s 2(3) of the Law of Property (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1989 (the 1989 Act) requires a contract for the sale or other disposition of land to be ‘signed by or on behalf of each party’. Neocleous v Rees [2019] EWHC 2462 (Ch), [2019] All ER (D) 25 (Oct) was the first occasion on which the court was asked to determine whether an email footer satisfied the requirement for a signature in s 2(3). The issue arose in the context of an alleged compromise agreement between the parties to a property dispute, which was contained in an exchange of emails between their solicitors. Viewed in the wider context of the earlier authorities, and a recent Law Commission report, the decision encourages practitioners to consider how formality requirements in property transactions—and more generally—are now operating in an increasingly digital world.’

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Falcon Chambers, 13th March 2020

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Alibrahim v Asturion Fondation [2020] EWCA Civ 32 – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted April 1st, 2020 in abuse of process, appeals, chambers articles, news, striking out by sally

‘The primary issue for the Court of Appeal in this case was what conduct constitutes abuse of process where one party to litigation unilaterally suspends proceedings for a substantial amount of time without the agreement of the other party nor the approval or an Order of the court.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 27th March 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Application to end draconian UKOG injunction banning peaceful protest at oil sites in Surrey and Sussex – Garden Court Chambers

‘Lawyers for five peaceful protestors, supported by the Weald Action Group, have applied to the High Court to bring an end to an interim injunction against protest at oil sites in Surrey and Sussex in line with a new Court of Appeal ruling.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 1st April 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Jeff King: The Lockdown is Lawful – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020 (Reg 6) and the Health Protection (Coronavirus Restrictions) (Wales) Regulations 2020 (Reg 8) both provide in identical wording that ‘During the emergency period, no person may leave the place where they are living without reasonable excuse.’ Both also enumerate thirteen exceptions (‘reasonable excuses’) to the rule. These are the restrictions widely referred to as the ‘lockdown.’ There is a question at the moment about whether they are so invasive as to be unlawful. This two-part post briefly reviews the legal basis for the confinement. I argue that the lockdown is lawful.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 1st April 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Question of Incompatibility – Deprivation of Children’s Liberty Without Court Order? – Family Law Week

‘All persons are guaranteed the right to liberty and security of the person, as enshrined in Article 5 of the European Convention of Human Rights. As such, when an issue arises with regard to a potential deprivation of liberty of a child (or indeed of any person), appropriate procedural safeguards must be in place to ensure the child’s Article 5 as well as their Article 8 rights to private and family life are sufficiently protected. For some time, the courts have undertaken this process through the use of the inherent jurisdiction of the High Court to authorise and review any such deprivation of liberty in a way that renders the process compliant with Article 5.’

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Family Law Week, 12th March 2020

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Guidance issued on remote access to Court of Protection – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Vice-President of the Court of Protection has today (31 March) issued updated guidance on remote access to the court.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 31st March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Coronavirus Act Amendments to the Care Act Now in Force and Guidance on Adult Social Care Duties Published – Coronavirus: Guidance for Business and Lawyers

Posted April 1st, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, local government, news, social services by sally

‘Arianna Kelly looks at the newly-published guidance on social care during the Emergency Period.’

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Coronavirus: Guidance for Business and Lawyers, 31st March 2020

Source: lawinthetimeofcorona.wordpress.com

Unimprovable: compensation under section 1 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1927 – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted April 1st, 2020 in chambers articles, compensation, consent, housing, landlord & tenant, news by sally

‘Some statutory provisions are not as well understood as they should be. Property practitioners are likely to be familiar with section 19 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1927 (LTA 1927), which implies into qualified covenants against the making of improvements to leasehold premises an obligation on the landlord not to withhold consent to such alterations unreasonably. This provision is not without authorities considering what amounts to unreasonably withholding consent, although admittedly fewer than the extensive canon of case law considering the related issue of consent to assigning or subletting under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1988. By contrast, there has been very little judicial consideration of the circumstances in which a tenant is entitled to compensation from its landlord for improvements carried out at the tenant’s expense.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 31st March 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Daughter in CoP case questions “second-rate” Skype justice – Legal Futures

‘An academic who was present at the first Court of Protection hearing to be conducted over Skype last month has raised concerns over its impact on relatives and witnesses.’

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Legal Futures, 1st April 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk