Government issues guidance on how local authorities can use Care Act ‘easements’ – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Department of Health & Social Care has published guidance setting out local authorities can use the new ‘easements’ under the Coronavirus Act 2020 that mean they no longer need to meet certain duties under the Care Act.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 1st April 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Jeff King: The Lockdown is Lawful: Part II – UK Constitutional Law Associaiton

‘In the post published yesterday, I explained that under Part 2A of the Public Health (Control of Diseases) Act 1984, UK and Welsh ministers can make regulations to protect public health that can impose ‘special restrictions’ on persons, things and premises. They can impose such restrictions in the same way that Justices of the Peace may do against individuals and groups. However, there are four exceptions to that general rule (section 45D(3)). The general regulation-making powers cannot be used to force a person to (a) submit to medical examination; be (b) removed to or (c) detained in a hospital or similar establishment, or, and mostly notably, (d) ‘be kept in isolation or quarantine.’ The rationale for the exclusions seems to be that these highly invasive things must be done on a case-by-case (i.e. person or group) instead of community-wide basis.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 2nd April 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Imposing Quistclose trusts—knowledge, not notice, as the golden rule (Goyal v Florence Care Ltd) – New Square Chambers

Posted April 2nd, 2020 in chambers articles, delay, equity, fiduciary duty, joint ventures, news, solicitors by sally

‘Goyal emphasises the importance of knowledge over notice in generating a Quistclose Trust. Solicitors and commercial fund managers should be alert to the possible implications arising from the allocation and management of communications received, mindful that attributed knowledge may still suffice in the right circumstances. Goyal provides an important reminder of the gateway function of an order for an account through which substantive remedies can be accessed. A party’s entitlement to an account following breach of fiduciary duty should not be circumscribed by judicial assumptions that little may be gained from the exercise, nor by considerations of the delay between relevant events and trial. An account may prove to be fruitless but a claimant should be entitled to find this out for themselves.’

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New Square Chambers, 23rd March 2020

Source: www.newsquarechambers.co.uk

York woman fined for breaching coronavirus rules – BBC News

Posted April 2nd, 2020 in coronavirus, emergency powers, enforcement, fines, health, news by sally

‘A woman has been fined for breaching coronavirus restrictions after she refused to tell police who she was and why she was at a railway station.’

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BBC News, 1st April 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Hot Air – Rope Walk Chambers

Posted April 2nd, 2020 in chambers articles, costs, judicial review, news by sally

‘In his latest Costs article, Andrew Hogan discussed Costs in relation to Judicial review.’

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Rope Walk Chambers, 31st March 2020

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Barclays not liable for alleged sexual assaults during medicals, court rules – The Guardian

‘Barclays is not liable for the alleged sexual assault of more than 100 patients by a doctor carrying out medicals on the bank’s behalf, the supreme court has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 1st April 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020 – Six Pump Court

‘Whilst the ongoing coronavirus pandemic is having a unprecedented impact upon human behaviour, businesses should also be aware of the risks to legal persons and officers created by The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020.’

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Six Pump Court, 27th March 2020

Source: www.6pumpcourt.co.uk

Morrisons not liable for massive staff data leak, court rules – The Guardian

‘The UK’s highest court has ruled that Morrisons should not be held liable for the criminal act of an employee with a grudge who leaked the payroll data of about 100,000 members of staff.’

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The Guardian, 1st April 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Witness Statements: Overlong and Over-lawyered? – Hailsham Chambers

Posted April 1st, 2020 in chambers articles, drafting, evidence, news, witnesses by sally

‘As many legal commentators including the author have noted recently: long, complex and detailed statements served particularly on behalf of lay witnesses, but written by their legal teams, can be more of a hindrance than of assistance. Straightforward cross-examinations of such witnesses will frequently prove effective in at the very least exciting the suspicion of a court as to the reliability of such lay evidence, or worse, in some cases causing questions to be asked as to their credibility when the inevitable rhetorical question is asked in closing as to whether such a person ever really could have had a reasonable belief in the veracity of what the statement contained.’

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Hailsham Chambers, 27th March 2020

Source: www.hailshamchambers.com

Whistleblowing: how easy is it to make a qualifying disclosure? – St John’s Buildings

‘It is generally assumed that the threshold for a statement made by a worker to qualify for whistleblowing protection is not high. After all, the information provided need only ‘tend’ to show, in the ‘reasonable belief’ of the worker that one of the wrongs identified in s.43B Employment Rights Act 1996 is being, has been, or will be committed. Often therefore, an unfair dismissal, or detriment, claim will proceed on the basis, without more, that the worker told the employer something to do with health and safety (or legal obligation or crime etc.). A deeper analysis of the s.43B requirements shows that qualification for protection is not as simple as first appears.’

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St John's Buildings, March 2020

Source: stjohnsbuildings.com

Is it possible to take a statutory declaration by Skype video or similar technology? – Hardwicke Chambers

‘Although the position is fast-moving and guidance is expected to be given in due course by the Law Society, it is presently understood that remote video conferencing technology such as Skype or Zoom could be used by a practising solicitor to administer a statutory declaration.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 26th March 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Do Medical Practitioners have a duty to disclose Genetic Disorders despite the Principles of Confidentiality? – Exchange Chambers

‘An analysis of the ethical and legal considerations underpinning a decision to inform a patient’s relatives about a diagnosis of a genetic disorder in light of the recent judgment handed down in ABC v St Georges Healthcare and Others [2020] EWHC 455 (QB).’

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Exchange Chambers, 25th March 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Directors disqualified after abandoning care homes, diverting council funds – Local Government Lawyer

‘The directors of two care homes in the Midlands have been disqualified after they diverted council funds before abandoning elderly residents and staff, the Insolvency Services has revealed.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 31st March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Coronavirus and detention under the Mental Health Act – Doughty Street Chambers

‘The Coronavirus Act 2020 (CA 2020) has now been passed. However not all the provisions have yet come into force. Many of the provisions (including the amendments to the Mental Health Act 1983 (MHA) and to the Care Act 2014) will come into force on a day appointed by a Minister according to regulations. Once in force, a part of the Act could also be suspended and revived. For further details on this, see our earlier post here.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 30th March 2020

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

In-house lawyer facilitated sham £16m property schemes – Legal Futures

‘A solicitor who acted as head of legal and a “puppet director” for a variety of companies involved in sham £16m property schemes has been struck off.’

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Legal Futures, 1st April 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The choice of experts in Catastrophic and Severe Brain Injury – Exchange Chambers

‘In this article I will examine the issues surrounding the choice of experts in catastrophic brain injury claims. I will write about what experts are reasonably required and in what order the experts should be instructed. We will look at the various expertise available and just what it is they do and how they can help the Court to resolve the issues.’

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Exchange Chambers, 25th March 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Council to appeal High Court ruling that stroke unit reconfiguration was lawful – Law Society Gazette

Posted April 1st, 2020 in appeals, equality, health, hospitals, local government, news by sally

‘Medway Council has lodged an appeal against a High Court decision which found that a joint committee of clinical commissioning groups had acted lawfully when dealing with health inequalities when they decided the locations of three hyper acute stroke units (HASUs) in Kent.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 31st March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Lawyers echo Sumption’s ‘police state’ warning – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Criticism by former Supreme Court justice Lord Sumption of apparent over-reach by police officers enforcing Covid-19 lockdown restrictions appears to have struck a chord in the legal profession.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 31st March 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Government acted unlawfully in sharing information that could lead to death penalty, rules UK Supreme Court – Garden Court Chambers

‘The UK Supreme Court today ruled that the British Government acted unlawfully in a case where it departed from the UK’s longstanding policy on opposing the death penalty in all circumstances.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 25th March 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

The quickly mutating Coronavirus legislation – drafting anomalies and police powers – UK Police Law Blog

‘The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Business Closure) (England) Regulations 2020 at reg 6(1) create a prohibition against leaving one’s home without reasonable excuse rather than being outside one’s home without reasonable excuse. Not only is that narrower than many people had thought, it shapes the powers of a police constable to direct or remove people to their home, which depends upon the constable considering that they have breached reg 6(1). Furthermore, in criminal proceedings for a breach, it may be that the burden of establishing of the defence of reasonable excuse is on a defendant in Scotland but on the prosecution in the other three home nations.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 31st March 2020

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com