Lord Bramall inquiry: How did police obtain search warrant for ‘PR exercise’, asks retired judge – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 25th, 2016 in child abuse, evidence, inquiries, judges, news, police, warrants, wasting police time, witnesses by sally

‘Exclusive: Metropolitan Police’s handling of aborted child sex abuse case challenged as key abuse witness reveals police informant “stole” details.’

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Daily Telegraph, 24th January 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Regina (HS and others) v South Cheshire Magistrates’ Court and another; Regina (MU and another)North Cheshire Magistrates’ Court; Regina (AM)South Cheshire Magistrates’ Court and another – WLR Daily

Posted December 4th, 2015 in judicial review, law reports, search & seizure, warrants by tracey

Regina (HS and others) v South Cheshire Magistrates’ Court and another: Regina (MU and another)North Cheshire Magistrates’ Court: Regina (AM)South Cheshire Magistrates’ Court and another: Regina (HS and others)Crown Court at Manchester and another: [2015] EWHC 3415 (Admin); [2015] WLR (D) 500

‘There was no general rule that there could be no application to the Crown Court under section 59 of the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 until every issue raised in a judicial review claim had been resolved by a decision of the High Court.’

WLR Daily, 30th November 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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NCA internal inquiry ‘will not undermine earlier cases’ – the Guardian

Posted November 30th, 2015 in national crime agency, news, search & seizure, warrants by sally

‘The National Crime Agency claims there is little prospect of completed cases being quashed despite having to launch a review into its use of warrants and production orders following the collapse of major trials.’

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The Guardian, 27th November 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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National Crime Agency reviews warrants after major trials collapse – The Guardian

‘The National Crime Agency (NCA) has launched an internal inquiry into its use of warrants and production orders following the collapse of major trials, amid warnings that other cases could be in jeopardy.’

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The Guardian, 27th November 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Interception, Authorisation and Redress in the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted November 5th, 2015 in bills, interception, investigatory powers, news, tribunals, warrants by sally

‘The Government has published a draft Bill on Investigatory Powers that it hopes to see through Parliament within a year. If it becomes law, the Investigatory Powers Bill will replace much, but not all, of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, as well as the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 5th November 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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UK surveillance powers explained – BBC News

‘A new law setting out what powers the UK state will have to monitor communications between citizens is set to be unveiled. How will it work?’

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BBC News, 4th November 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Giving judges power to grant spying warrants instead of ministers would be ‘glib’ says ex anti-terror adviser – The Independent

‘Putting judges in charge of issuing surveillance warrants would fail because they lack the sufficient knowledge of national security issues, the Government’s former anti-terror adviser has said.’

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The Independent, 2nd November 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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European court of human rights rules secret hearings legal – The Guardian

Posted October 21st, 2015 in closed material, deportation, detention, human rights, inquiries, news, warrants by sally

‘Secret hearings to determine whether suspects should be held without charge during anti-terror investigations are legal, the European court of human rights has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 20th October 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Slovakian jailed for raping teenager ‘while high on glue-like substance’ – Daily Telegraph

‘Court hears Zdenko Turtak, a 22-year-old Slovakian Roma, clubbed his victim 18 times with a rock and left her for dead in the Beeston area of Leeds.’

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Daily Telegraph, 20th October 2015

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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NCA slammed as ‘ignorant’ and ‘ill-informed’ by High Court judge after agency used unlawful search warrants – The Independent

Posted May 14th, 2015 in investigatory powers, national crime agency, news, warrants by tracey

‘The National Crime Agency has been condemned as “incompetent” and “systematically flawed” by a High Court judge – after officers unlawfully used search warrants to plant a surveillance device without warning magistrates.’

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The Independent, 13th May 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Regina (M) v Chief Constable of Hampshire Constabulary (Secretary of State for the Home Department intervening) – WLR Daily

Regina (M) v Chief Constable of Hampshire Constabulary (Secretary of State for the Home Department intervening) [2014] EWCA Civ 1651 ; [2014] WLR (D) 541

‘Informal visits by the police officers to a registered sex offender’s home seeking entry by consent were in accordance with the law. The scheme for the protection of vulnerable persons from sex offenders as a whole was not disproportionate.’

WLR Daily, 18th December 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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HMRC raid on claims management company was lawful, High Court rules – Litigation Futures

‘HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) did not act unlawfully when it searched and removed files from a claims management company it was investigating, the High Court has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 15th December 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Sponging the blot on the law – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted December 11th, 2014 in bailment, mortgages, news, repossession, warrants by sally

‘Having your home repossessed by your mortgagee is not, one imagines, a happy experience, and not one which would incline you to act charitably towards your bank. Few are the defaulting borrowers who treat their houses to a spring clean on their final day before the order for possession is executed, apologising to the bailiffs that they don’t seem able to put their hands on any tea bags. Or indeed the kettle. It’s all been packed, you see. A commoner experience is to find that at least some belongings have been left behind. A bin bag here, a wonky shelving unit there. There’s nothing like losing your home to make you reassess the stuff which surrounds you, and decide whether now might be a good time to de-clutter your life. And why go to the expense of hiring a skip when you can leave your mortgagee with the cost of doing it for you?’

Full story

Hardwicke Chambers, 11th December 2014

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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Cracking intercepts: the war on terror and difficulties with Human Rights – UK Human Rights Blog

‘This is a fascinating case, not just on the facts or merits but because it is generated by two of the major catalysts of public law litigation: the government’s duty to look after the security of its citizens, and the rapid outpacing of surveillance law by communications technology. Anyone who has seen The Imitation Game, a film loosely based on the biography of Alan Turing, will appreciate the conflicting currents at the core of this case: the rights of an individual to know, and foresee, what the limits of his freedom are, and the necessity to conceal from the enemy how much we know about their methods. Except the Turing film takes place in official wartime, whereas now the state of being at “war” has taken on a wholly different character.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 11th December 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Judges dismiss legal challenge to EU arrest warrant – BBC News

Posted November 17th, 2014 in EC law, extradition, judicial review, news, warrants by sally

‘A legal challenge to try to prevent the UK continuing to comply with the European Arrest Warrant has failed.’

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BBC News, 14th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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European Arrest Warrant: Judges urge UK support – BBC News

Posted November 6th, 2014 in EC law, extradition, judges, legal profession, news, warrants by sally

‘The UK risks becoming a “safe haven” for foreign criminals if it votes to opt out of the European Arrest Warrant (EAW) system, senior judges have said.’

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BBC News, 6th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Home Office told to disclose advice behind decision on intercept evidence – The Guardian

‘The Home Office has been ordered to release secret legal advice justifying its decision to prevent intercept evidence being used in criminal trials. The ruling by an information tribunal could shine a light on the way intelligence agencies gather and store material as well as on their relationship with law enforcement organisations. The appeal for the advice to be disclosed was made by the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law which submitted a Freedom of Information request to uncover the reasoning behind a 2009 report, entitled “Intercept as Evidence”.’

Full story

The Guardian, 16th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Regina (Panesar) v Central Criminal Court and another – WLR Daily

Regina (Panesar) v Central Criminal Court and another; [2014] EWHC 2821 (Admin); [2014] WLR (D) 382

‘Notwithstanding that the material in question had been seized without good grounds and that the relevant warrants had been quashed, the Crown Court enjoyed jurisdiction to hear an application that material held subsequent to seizure in execution of search warrants should be retained by an investigating authority.’

WLR Daily, 14th August 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Julian Assange: do recent changes to extradition law make any difference? – Head of Legal

Posted August 19th, 2014 in extradition, news, warrants by tracey

‘In a word – no. In a press conference this morning, Julian Assange told reporters a WikiLeaks spokesman could confirm that “I am leaving the embassy soon” and the Ecuadorian Foreign Minister, according to the Guardian “referred to recent changes to the extradition laws in the UK which he believed would mean Mr Assange would not be facing extradition if the case started today.” Notice he did not claim these changes make any actual difference now; merely that they would have made a difference had the case started today. It started (and ended) some time ago, so they make no difference at all.’

Full story

Head of Legal, 18th August 2014

Source: www.headoflegal.com

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Regina (Allensway Recycling Ltd and others) v Environment Agency – WLR Daily

Posted May 29th, 2014 in environmental protection, law reports, notification, warrants, waste by michael

Regina (Allensway Recycling Ltd and others) v Environment Agency [2014] EWHC 1638 (Admin);  [2014] WLR (D)  225

‘Section 108(6) of the Environment Act 1995, when read together with Schedule 18 to that Act, only required seven days’ notice to have been given prior to the issue of a warrant for entry and inspection relating to residential premises where that warrant was to be issued under conditions (a) or (b) of paragraph 2(2) of the Schedule. There was no such notice requirement in relation to a warrant issued under conditions (c), (d) or (e).’

WLR Daily, 21st May 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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