Márquez Samohano v Universitat Pompeu Fabra – WLR Daily

Márquez Samohano v Universitat Pompeu Fabra: (Case C-190/13); [2014] WLR (D)  129

‘Clause 5 of the Framework Agreement on fixed-term work, annexed to Council Directive 1999/70/EC, did not preclude national rules which allowed universities to renew successive fixed term employment contracts concluded with associate lecturers, with no limitation as to the maximum duration and the number of renewals of those contracts, where such contracts were justified by an objective reason within the meaning of clause 5(1)(a), which was a matter for the referring court to verify. It was also for that court to ascertain that whether the renewal of the successive fixed-term employment contracts at issue was actually intended to cover temporary needs and that rules were not, in fact, used to meet fixed and permanent needs in terms of employment of teaching staff.’

WLR Daily, 13th March 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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OFT: ‘significant gaps’ in university prospectuses – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 14th, 2014 in advertising, consumer protection, fees, news, universities by tracey

‘The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) warns that universities are failing to supply students with enough information before they apply, but finds no evidence of ‘fee fixing’ between institutions.’

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Daily Telegraph, 14th March 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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OFT warns universities about sanctions on students in debt – The Guardian

Posted February 19th, 2014 in consumer protection, debts, disciplinary procedures, news, ombudsmen, universities by sally

‘The Office of Fair Trading has written to more than 170 universities and other higher education groups warning that the widespread practice of stopping students graduating or continuing with their course if they owe money over issues such as late library books or childcare services could breach consumer laws.’

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The Guardian, 18th February 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UCAS and the extent of FOIA: Tribunal favours wide approach – Panopticon

‘Transparency advocates often express frustration at the number of bodies which are not within the scope of FOIA, because they are not listed or designated as ‘public authorities’ for FOIA purposes. The Coalition government responded by announcing, in January 2011, that FOIA would be extended to a number of additional bodies. This was done with effect from 1 November 2011, through the Freedom of Information (Designation as Public Authorities) Order 2011. This brought the Association of Chief Police Officers of England, Wales and Northern Ireland (ACPO); the Financial Ombudsman Service and the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) within the scope of FOIA.’

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Panopticon, 16th January 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Scientology, University Unrest and Right to Die – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

‘This week, the Church of Scientology registered a win of sorts in the Supreme Court, while London’s biggest university said no to occupational student protests just as others were contemplating the possibility of gender-segregated talks  Meanwhile, the Home Secretary puts forward her answer to modern day slavery, while the Joint Committee on Human Rights puts pressure on Chris Grayling regarding the proposed legal aid reforms.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 16th December 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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University segregation guidance – manifesting, not imposing, beliefs – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘Controversy has been sparked by the guidance issued by Universities UK entitled External speakers in higher education institutions on the question of gender segregation in university talks.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 13th December 2013

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Official watchdog says university sex segregation plans ‘not permissible’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted December 13th, 2013 in education, equality, human rights, Islam, news, sex discrimination, universities by sally

‘Exclusive: The Equality and Human Rights Commission steps into the row over controversial guidelines which said gender segregation on campus should be allowed.’

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Daily Telegraph, 12th December 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Tetraplegic student Andrew Risk paralysed after diving into 2ft of water loses damages claim against college – The Independent

’25-year-old had claimed his injury in June 2009 was caused by a breach of duty of care or negligence on the part of Rose Bruford College in Sidcup.’

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The Independent, 6th December 2013

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Richard III remains: York v Leicester legal battle to be laid to rest – The Guardian

‘An “unseemly and undignified” legal battle over where the remains of the last Plantagenet king of England, Richard III, should be laid to rest resumes on Tuesday, 528 years after his death and a year after his skeleton was found under a Leicester car park. Richard’s remains are currently in a laboratory at Leicester University.’

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The Guardian, 26th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Paddling pool victim seeks millions – Daily Telegraph

“Student Andrew Risk, who was paralysed after diving into 2ft of water, sues Rose Bruford drama school for ‘failing to control high jinx at summer ball’.”

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Daily Telegraph, 20th November 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Student litigation – Choosing the right words – Hardwicke Chambers

“The case of Mr John Scarborough v Canterbury Christ Church University (Scarborough) which was recently decided carries potentially significant implications in terms of bringing a case that may fall under separate heads of action.This article discusses this decision and its practical effect on future litigation.”

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Hardwicke Chambers, 7th November 2013

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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Protester cleared of threatening behaviour for calling Hove MP ‘a coward’ – The Independent

Posted November 14th, 2013 in demonstrations, freedom of expression, news, threatening behaviour, universities by tracey

“A Judge has ruled that a protester who called Conservative MP Mike Weatherley ‘a coward’ was not guilty of breaking the law.”

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The Independent, 13th November 2013

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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R ota Nfuni v Solihull MBC [2013] EWHC 3155 – Education Law Blog

Posted November 7th, 2013 in asylum, children, education, immigration, local government, news, universities by tracey

“In this case the claimant was a failed asylum seeker.  She had arrived in the UK at the age of 16. When she turned 18, the local authority continued to support her accommodation and education under section 23C of the Children Act 1989. This imposes after-care duties towards ‘former relevant children’, including by subsection (4) financial assistance in connection with education or training ‘to the extent that [her] welfare and [her] educational or training needs require it’. ”

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Education Law Blog, 27th October 2013

Source: www.education11kbw.com

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The IALS Think Tank on Law Reform – Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Posted October 29th, 2013 in consultations, Law Commission, news, universities by sally

“The IALS Think Tank is an initiative aiming to collect the valuable expertise of the many Fellows and staff of the IALS, invite proposals for law reform, selecting the most appropriate one, offering feedback and advice for its refinement, endorsing the final product, and submitting it to the Commission in time for its consideration in the public consultation for its programmes.”

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Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 22nd October 2013

Source: www.ials.sas.ac.uk

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OFT to investigate competition between universities – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 22nd, 2013 in competition, consumer protection, news, universities by tracey

“The Office of Fair Trading announced it would examine how universities in England compete for undergraduates and whether degree courses meet students’ expectations.”

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Daily Telegraph, 22nd October 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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No law degree required for would-be solicitors – Times Higher Education

Posted October 17th, 2013 in legal education, news, solicitors, universities by sally

“Solicitors will no longer need to have a degree in order to qualify under a radical shake-up of legal training that it has been claimed could spell the ‘death’ of some law undergraduate courses.”

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Times Higher Education, 17th October 2013

Source: www.timeshighereducation.co.uk

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Doctoral students: when does supervision become harassment? – Education Law Blog

Posted September 18th, 2013 in complaints, electronic mail, harassment, news, universities by sally

“The case of Saha v Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine [2013] EWHC 2438 (QB) concerned a £1.5m claim for harassment by a doctoral student against her supervisor Following a hearing that lasted 7 days, with the claimant acting in person, Hamblen J dismissed the claim in its entirety, summarising his conclusions at [160] as follows:

‘I find that a number of the alleged incidents are not proven, and those that are proved do not involve harassment. At most they involve treating Miss Saha in an abrupt, peremptory and at times vexed manner. They do not involve aggressive, bullying or threatening behaviour.’”

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Education Law Blog, 18th September 2013

Source: www.education11kbw.com

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BPP awarded university status – The Lawyer

Posted August 8th, 2013 in legal education, news, universities by sally

“BPP has been awarded university status, following confirmation by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) that the private provider meets the criteria for the title.”

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The Lawyer, 8th August 2013

Source: www.thelawyer.com

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The duty to give former looked after children assistance with education – Education Law Blog

Posted August 5th, 2013 in appeals, children, education, local government, news, statutory duty, universities by sally

“I posted back in February about the High Court’s decision in R (Kebede) v Newcastle City Council [2013] EWHC 355 (Admin) that local authorities have a duty (and not a discretion) to make a grant in relation to educational expenses and that this could include a grant for tuition fees.”

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Education Law Blog, 4th August 2013

Source: www.education11kbw.com

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Regina (Kebede and another) v Newcastle City Council – WLR Daily

Posted August 1st, 2013 in appeals, children, education, law reports, local government, universities by sally

Regina (Kebede and another) v Newcastle City Council [2013] EWCA Civ 960; [2013] WLR (D) 322

“A local authority had a duty to a former relevant child going on to higher education to make a grant to meet expenses connected with his education, including the major expense of tuition fees.”

WLR Daily, 31st July 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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