Charles Taylor, Liberian president who ‘ate the hearts of his enemies’, sues the UK government for denying him right to family life – The Independent

Posted June 19th, 2014 in appeals, crimes against humanity, human rights, news, United Nations by sally

‘An African warlord serving 50 years in prison for crimes against humanity is suing Britain for denying him the right to a family life.’

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The Independent, 19th June 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Emily MacKenzie: The Lawfulness of Detention by British Forces in Afghanistan – Serdar Mohammed v Ministry of Defence – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On 2nd May, the High Court held that the UK Government must pay Serdar Mohammed (SM) compensation because British troops detained him unlawfully in Afghanistan. The case raised a myriad of international law issues, which are dealt with elegantly in an extensive judgment by Mr Justice Leggatt. This post will attempt to summarise some of the key issues involved.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 2nd June 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Chagos Islands dispute: court to rule on UK sovereignty claim – The Guardian

‘Britain’s sovereignty over the Chagos Islands and America’s lease for the Diego Garcia military base could be thrown into doubt by an international court hearing due to open in Istanbul on Tuesday.’

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The Guardian, 21st April 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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IA (Iran) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees intervening) – WLR Daily

Posted January 31st, 2014 in asylum, burden of proof, law reports, refugees, Scotland, treaties, United Nations by sally

IA (Iran) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees intervening) [2014] UKSC 6; [2014] WLR (D) 36

‘National decision-makers had an independent and autonomous responsibility under the Convention and Protocol relating to the Status of Refugees (1951) (Cmd 9171) and (1967) (Cmnd 3906) to determine the applications of those who had applied for asylum. An earlier decision of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (“UNHCR”) to grant refugee status was not binding on the national decision-maker, nor did it create any presumption or shift the burden of proof.’

WLR Daily, 29th January 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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I.A. (Appellant) v The Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) (Scotland) – Supreme Court

Posted January 30th, 2014 in appeals, asylum, law reports, refugees, Scotland, Supreme Court, treaties, United Nations by sally

I.A. (Appellant) v The Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) (Scotland) [2014] UKSC 6 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 29th January 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Regina (Youssef) v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs – WLR Daily

Regina (Youssef) v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [2013] EWCA Civ 1302 ;   [2013] WLR (D)  412

“The Foreign Secretary had acted lawfully by applying a test of reasonable grounds for suspecting that the claimant met the criteria for designation on a UN Security Council’s consolidated list of persons to be treated as associated with an Islamic terrorist group . The law did not require the Foreign Secretary to stymie the designation because other states relied on evidence obtained by torture. That any review by the court of the designation decision was by way of the conventional rationality test.”

WLR Daily, 29th October 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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War criminal Charles Taylor to serve 50-year sentence in British prison – The Guardian

Posted October 11th, 2013 in imprisonment, news, sentencing, United Nations, war crimes by sally

“Charles Taylor, the convicted former Liberian president, will serve his 50-year sentence for war crimes in a British prison, the ministry of justice has confirmed.”

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The Guardian, 10th October 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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‘Shocking’ bedroom tax should be axed, says UN investigator – The Guardian

Posted September 11th, 2013 in government departments, housing, human rights, news, taxation, United Nations by tracey

“Housing expert Raquel Rolnik says policy could constitute a violation of the human right to adequate housing.”

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The Guardian, 11th September 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

 

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Expecting business to respect human rights without incentives or Sanctions – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted September 5th, 2013 in company law, enforcement, human rights, news, sanctions, United Nations by sally

“Cross-government coordination on an issue that affects trade, international development, foreign affairs, business activity and human rights is remarkable, especially at such a difficult economic time. So the UK’s Action Plan on Business and Human Rights, which is the government’s long-awaited strategy for implementing the 2011 UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, is to be applauded for this achievement. Yet, while the Plan establishes clear expectations that UK companies should respect human rights, there are no effective legal requirements placed on them to do so.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 4th September 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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UN to investigate impact of ‘bedroom tax’ on human rights of low-income households – The Independent

Posted September 5th, 2013 in benefits, housing, human rights, news, social security, United Nations by sally

“The impact of the so-called ‘bedroom tax’ on the human rights of low-income households is being examined by a senior United Nations official.”

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The Independent, 4th September 2013

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Exclusive: UN ruling puts future of UK wind farms in jeopardy – The Independent

“Plans for future wind farms in Britain could be in jeopardy after a United Nations legal tribunal ruled that the UK Government acted illegally by denying the public decision-making powers over their approval and the ‘necessary information’ over their benefits or adverse effects.”

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The Independent, 27th August 2013

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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British fears grow over legal justification for Syria strike – Daily Telegraph

Posted August 28th, 2013 in armed forces, chemical weapons, international law, news, United Nations by sally

“David Cameron is facing demands to set out the legal justification for military action against Syria amid mounting unease over the scale and speed of Britain’s commitment to another conflict in the Middle East.”

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Daily Telegraph, 26th August 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Gibraltar row: UK considering ‘unprecedented’ legal action – BBC News

“The UK government is considering legal action against Spain over the imposition of additional border checks in Gibraltar, Downing Street has said.”

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BBC News, 12th August 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Britain and the International Rule of Law – Attorney General’s Office

Posted July 8th, 2013 in international law, jurisdiction, news, rule of law, United Nations by sally

“Speech to Chatham House on Britain’s contribution to the development of international law Originally given at London. This is the text of the speech as drafted, which may differ slightly from the delivered version.”

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Attorney General’s Office, 3rd July 2013

Source: www.gov.uk/ago

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Halaf v Darzhavna agentsia za bezhantsite pri Ministerskia savet – WLR Daily

Posted June 6th, 2013 in asylum, EC law, immigration, law reports, United Nations by sally

Halaf v Darzhavna agentsia za bezhantsite pri Ministerskia savet (Case C-528/11); [2013] WLR (D) 214

“Article 3(2) of Council Regulation (EC) No 343/2003 of 18 February 2003, establishing the criteria and mechanisms for determining the member state responsible for examining an asylum application lodged in one of the member states by a third-country national, permitted a member state, which was not indicated as responsible by the criteria in Chapter III of the Regulation, to examine an application for asylum even though no circumstances existed which established the applicability of the humanitarian clause in article 15 of the Regulation. That possibility was not conditional on the member state responsible under those criteria having failed to respond to a request to take back the asylum seeker concerned. The member state in which the asylum seeker was present was not obliged, during the process of determining the member state responsible, to request the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to present its views where it was apparent from the documents of that office that the member state indicated as responsible by the criteria in Chapter III of Regulation No 343/2003 was in breach of the rules of European Union law on asylum.”

WLR Daily, 30th May 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Hacker jailed for bid to steal carbon credits from UN – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 19th, 2013 in carbon dioxide emissions, computer crime, news, sentencing, United Nations by tracey

“A cyber-criminal nicknamed the ‘Black Dragon’, who masterminded an audacious
attempt to hack into the United Nations computer systems to steal £6.5m worth of
carbon credits, was jailed for three-and-a-half years yesterday.”

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Daily Telegraph, 19th March 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Lord Neuberger to the executive: get your tanks off the judicial lawn – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted March 6th, 2013 in human rights, judiciary, legal aid, news, United Nations by sally

“In a rare public intervention Lord Neuberger, President of the UK Supreme Court, has flagged three important issues that should be of concern to us all.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 6th March 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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High Court challenge over 17-year-olds’ custody rights – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted February 22nd, 2013 in custody, detention, judicial review, news, police, United Nations, young offenders by sally

“The High Court will hear a legal challenge to the practice of treating 17-year-olds detained in police custody as adults, in a judicial review being brought by Just For Kids Law next week.”

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Law Society’s Gazette, 22nd February 2013

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Were James Bulger’s killers too young to stand trial? – The Guardian

Posted February 6th, 2013 in criminal responsibility, murder, news, United Nations, young offenders by sally

“Twenty years ago, two 10-year-olds were prosecuted for murdering a toddler in Merseyside. Despite pressure from child protection campaigners, the UK’s minimum age of criminal responsibility remains one of the lowest in the world.”

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The Guardian, 5th February 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Britain faces UN tribunal over Chagos Islands marine reserve – The Guardian

“Britain’s colonial-era decision to sever an Indian Ocean archipelago from Mauritius and turn it into a US military base will have to be justified before an international tribunal – a process that could lead to the return of the islands’ exiled inhabitants.”

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The Guardian, 28th January 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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