Missed opportunities: the right of light and human rights – Tanfield Chambers

Posted April 26th, 2016 in human rights, news, treaties by sally

‘It is surprising that, during the 16 years that the Human Rights Act 1998 “HRA98” has been in force, that there has been no case in which the domestic courts have ruled upon the impact of convention rights in a case involving a right to light. The explanation for this may be found in the perception that convention rights are enforceable against public bodies, an understandable view in light of s6 of the HRA98, while litigation in these cases is between commercial organisations or private individuals. However, the perception that convention rights cannot apply in litigation between private individuals is not entirely correct. This article seeks to explore the basis upon which convention rights may assist in those cases concerning a right to light where conventional argument may not provide a successful outcome.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 22nd April 2016

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

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What has the European Court of Human Rights done for us? – The Independent

‘Campaigners and politicians have criticised Home Secretary Theresa May’s assertion that Britain should leave the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR).’

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The Independent, 25th April 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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The Legal Mechanics of Brexit – 11 KBW

Posted March 14th, 2016 in EC law, legislation, news, referendums, treaties by sally

‘This paper will offer some crystal ball gazing about how Brexit might take legal effect. It is necessarily speculative and uncertain. It looks at:-
(1) the referendum;
(2) withdrawal from membership of the EU under the Treaty for European Union (“TEU”);
and
(3) the effect of the European Communities Act 1972 (“the ECA”).’

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11 KBW, 1st March 2016

Source: www.11kbw.com

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Changes to compensation for nuclear incidents published by UK government – OUT-LAW.com

Posted March 9th, 2016 in accidents, compensation, news, nuclear power, treaties by tracey

‘Changes to the rules governing compensation for nuclear incidents will increase the amounts payable, as well as expand the categories of damage for which compensation may be claimed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th March 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

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A “Legally Binding and Irreversible” Agreement on the Reform of the EU – Henderson Chambers

Posted February 24th, 2016 in benefits, EC law, freedom of movement, news, treaties by sally

‘This Note addresses the question whether the agreement representing the outcome of the negotiations between the United Kingdom and the European Union on the reform of the EU can appropriately be characterised, in the Prime Minister’s phrase, as “legally binding and irreversible”. The original version of the Note was submitted as written evidence to the House of Commons European Scrutiny Committee (“the Scrutiny Committee”), following on from oral evidence that I gave, together with Sir Francis Jacobs QC and Martin Howe QC, on 18 November 2015. That version was prepared in relation to the draft texts accompanying the letter dated 2 February 2016 from Mr Donald Tusk, the President of the European Council, to the Prime Minister. As presented here, the Note relates to the agreement finally reached on 19 February 2016, which differs in some respects from the texts circulated on 2 February, but not so as to cause me to take a different view of the matters discussed.’

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Henderson Chambers, 20th February 2016

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

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Cavalier with our Constitution: a Charter too far – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted February 10th, 2016 in constitutional law, EC law, human rights, news, treaties by sally

‘Last week Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, tabled a set of proposals which the government hopes will form the basis of the UK’s renegotiated relationship with the EU, in advance of an in-out referendum. Politically, the proposals may be just the job: a new commitment to enhance competitiveness, proposals to limit benefits to migrants, recognition that member states’ different aspirations for further integration must be respected, and creation of a (“red card”) mechanism to block EU legislation. Legally, however, they raise more questions than they answer.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 9th February 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Diplomats use Vienna Convention to fight London basement digout – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 11th, 2016 in appeals, diplomats, housing, news, planning, treaties by tracey

‘An argument over an extension plan next door to the French embassy in London has gone global as an unlikely alliance of diplomats has formed, citing the 1961 Vienna Convention, in a bid to kill it off.’

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Daily Telegraph, 9th January 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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When humanitarian law meets human rights – OUP Blog

Posted December 15th, 2015 in human rights, international law, news, treaties, war by sally

‘As we reflect on Human Rights Month and the implications of conflict throughout 2015, we have asked some of the humanitarian law scholars who contributed to the new Geneva Conventions Commentary to explore the interplay between these two important legal disciplines, and how we should approach them in the future.’

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OUP Blog, 15th December 2015

Source: www.blog.oup.com

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Lord Woolf warns of ‘dangers’ and ‘expense’ of scrapping Human Rights Act – Daily Telegraph

Posted November 11th, 2015 in deportation, EC law, human rights, international law, judges, news, treaties by sally

‘Abolishing current human rights laws will create uncertainty and give clever lawyers a field day, says former Lord Chief Justice.’

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Daily Telegraph, 10th November 2015

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Limping Infants and Article 15 BIIA: the “magisterial” judgment in In the Matter of N (Children) (Adoption: Jurisdiction) – Family Law Week

Posted November 10th, 2015 in adoption, appeals, care orders, EC law, foreign jurisdictions, news, treaties by sally

‘Alex Laing, barrister of Coram Chambers, considers two aspects of the decision in N (Children) (Adoption: Jurisdiction): (1) the jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales to order the non-consensual adoption of a foreign child; and (2) the construction and use of Article 15 of Brussels IIA to transfer care proceedings.’

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Family Law Week, 10th November 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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£150m legal bill for troops just doing their duty – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 20th, 2015 in armed forces, bills, costs, human rights, judicial review, law firms, news, time limits, treaties, war by sally

‘Ministers draw up plans to pull out of the European Convention on Human Rights next time the Armed Forces are sent into combat.’

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Daily Telegraph, 17th October 2015

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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CPS under pressure but not near collapse, says attorney general – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The Crown Prosecution Service is under pressure but not on the “brink of collapse”, the attorney general told a House of Commons committee last night.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 16th September 2015

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Leaving the EU—impact on case law and legislation – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted August 14th, 2015 in bills, EC law, news, referendums, treaties by tracey

‘If the UK votes to leave the EU what will be the impact on case law and legislation? Tim Eicke QC, a leading public and EU law advocate, looks at some of the issues that might arise domestically and internationally with a decision to leave the Union.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 13th August 2015

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Feest v South West Strategic Health Authority (Bay Island Voyages, third party) – WLR Daily

Feest v South West Strategic Health Authority (Bay Island Voyages, third party):[2015] EWCA Civ 708; [2015] WLR (D) 306

‘The time bar prescribed by article 16 of the Convention relating to the Carriage of Passengers and their Luggage by Sea, scheduled to the Merchant Shipping Act 1979, for the bringing of claims against a carrier did not apply to claims against a carrier for contribution in respect of the liability of others to the passenger.’

WLR Daily, 15th July 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Child Abduction and Inchoate Rights – Family Law week

Posted June 19th, 2015 in child abduction, law reports, parental responsibility, treaties by tracey

‘Marie Crawford, barrister of Becket Chambers, considers one of the most significant developments in relation to child abduction cases in the last thirty years.’

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Family Law Week, 11th June 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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Paul Bernal: Privacy, Surveillance and Brexit…. – UK Constitutional Law Association

An Englishman’s home is his castle, so the old saying goes, and it might be thought that the implication is that the English place a special importance on privacy. The reverse, however, seems to be the case, when the law is considered – for much of the law that provides protection for our privacy, particularly in relation to surveillance, does not originate in the UK but in Europe. With the perfect storm of possible ‘Brexit’ and the potential repeal of the Human Rights Act (HRA), that might leave our privacy in an even more precarious state than it currently is. The so-called ‘British Bill of Rights’ has yet to see the light of day: one of the key questions could be what provision it makes for privacy, particularly in relation to the internet and other forms of communications.
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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th June 2015

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Tory plans will destroy human rights across Europe, warns Dominic Grieve – The Guardian

Posted June 12th, 2015 in bills, human rights, news, repeals, treaties by sally

‘It will be impossible to enforce human rights across Europe if the Conservative party carries out its threat to withdraw from the Strasbourg court, the former attorney general Dominic Grieve QC has warned.’

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The Guardian, 11th June 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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On Fantasy Island: British politics, English judges and the European Convention on Human Rights – LSE Public Lecture

Posted June 8th, 2015 in human rights, judiciary, news, speeches, treaties by sally

‘Conor Gearty unpicks the myths, illusions and downright lies that infect political engagement with human rights in Britain – and discussion of the Human Rights Act in particular.’

Listen

LSE Public Lecture, Recorded on 6 November 2014

Source: www.lse.ac.uk

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No call for revolution – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted June 8th, 2015 in courts, human rights, news, treaties by sally

‘Last week the Queen revealed that the newly-elected government had delayed its promised proposals to repeal the Human Rights Act. If this signals a willingness to listen and reflect, rather than an opportunity to bring potential rebels into line, then so much the better. Let us keep talking.
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UK Human Rights Blog, 4th June 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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The Independent Guide to the UK Constitution: What everyone should know about the most explosive political issue of our time – The Independent

Posted June 8th, 2015 in bills, constitutional reform, human rights, news, repeals, treaties by sally

‘The UK’s democratic liberties are the envy of the world. They are also precarious. We have no written constitution, and the unwritten traditions on which we rely instead are increasingly being called into question. Human rights, the monarchy, Europe, the sovereignty of Parliament, the formation of governments – are there any first principles on which we can agree? On the eve of the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, Andy McSmith kicks off a week-long series on a subject of vital national importance’.’

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The Independent, 7th June 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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