Attempt to scrap Human Rights Act will not get past Lords, Falconer warns Gove – The Guardian

‘A new British bill of rights is expected to be included in the Queen’s speech, but shadow lord chancellor says upper house would be within its rights to reject it.’

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The Guardian, 22nd May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Does the Human Rights Act prevent us deporting serious criminals? – Free Movement

Posted May 26th, 2015 in deportation, human rights, immigration, news, reports, statistics, treaties by sally

‘It is very widely believed that the Human Rights Act stops the UK from deporting foreign criminals whence they came. To a limited extent, there is some truth in this. Some appeals against deportation decisions do succeed on human rights grounds. Not many, though, and none succeed because of the Human Rights Act as distinct from the European Convention on Human Rights. Other appeals against deportation succeed under EU law or the Refugee Convention.’

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Free Movement, 26th May 2015

Source: www.freemovement.org.uk

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British judges not bound by European court of human rights, says Leveson – The Guardian

Posted May 26th, 2015 in courts, human rights, news, precedent, treaties by sally

‘Sir Brian Leveson, the judge most famous for his report into press ethics, has said he does not consider himself “crushed by the European jackboot” when it comes to applying the European convention of human rights in British courts.’

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The Guardian, 24th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Civil procedure: costs recoverability – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A discrete but significant issue on costs recently came before the Court of Appeal in R (on the application of HS2 Action Alliance Ltd) v Secretary of State for Transport [2015] EWCA Civ 203.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 18th May 2015

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Sex and the selfie generation – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘It is not just people that struggle to keep up with technology, but the law itself often lags behind. We have seen that on numerous occasions with the “Twitter prosecutions”, and had another example of that this week, when the Daily Mirror highlighted the story of “Alison” and “’Peter” (both pseudonyms) a couple aged 17 and 22 respectively.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 19th May 2015

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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HRA Watch: Reform, Repeal, Replace? Tobias Lock: Legal implications of human rights reform in the UK – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted May 15th, 2015 in constitutional law, devolution, news, treaties by tracey

‘The return of a majority Conservative government in last week’s general election in the UK has made the Conservative Party’s plans for reforming human rights law in the United Kingdom a likely prospect. It is recalled that on 3 October 2014, the Conservative Party published its policy document ‘Protecting Human Rights in the UK’ which sets out its proposal to repeal the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA) and replace it with a new British Bill of Rights. In addition, the policy document also raised the prospect that the UK might withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 15th May 2015

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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What is the Human Rights Act and why does Michael Gove want to scrap it? – The Independent

Posted May 11th, 2015 in human rights, news, political parties, treaties by sally

‘The Conservatives’ manifesto says the party wants to scrap the Human Rights Act. David Cameron has appointed Michael Gove, the former education secretary, to be Justice Secretary. This mean he’ll have most of the responsibility for policy over the area.’

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The Independent, 11th May 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Michael Gove to proceed with Tories’ plans to scrap human rights act – The Guardian

Posted May 11th, 2015 in bills, human rights, news, political parties, treaties by sally

‘Michael Gove, the new justice secretary, is to press ahead with plans to scrap the Human Rights Act which could see Britain pull out of the European convention on human rights (ECHR) if the reforms are rejected by Strasbourg.’

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The Guardian, 10th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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The Supreme Court on statelessness, EU citizenship and proportionality – UK Human Rights Blog

‘On first glance, this was not a judgment about human rights. It concerned the definition of statelessness under article 1(1) of the 1954 Convention Relating to the Status of Stateless Persons, and raised issues of competence and jurisdiction in relation to EU citizenship. Its specific interest for human rights lawyers lies primarily in the observations about the principle of proportionality; and in where the case, which most certainly does raise human rights issues, is likely to go next.

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UK Human Rights Blog, 31st March 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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UK benefit cap is lawful, supreme court rules – The Guardian

‘The supreme court has ruled that the government’s benefit cap, which limits unemployed claimants to £500 a week in total welfare payments, is lawful.’

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The Guardian, 18th March 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Human Rights at the Crossroads? – BBC Unreliable Evidence

Posted February 6th, 2015 in constitutional law, elections, human rights, news, parliament, Supreme Court, treaties, veto by sally

‘Clive Anderson and guests get behind the political rhetoric to debate the potential impact on the rights of British citizens if the Government carries out a proposal to scrap the Human Rights Act and replace it with a “more British” Bill of Rights.’

Listen

BBC Unreliable Evidence, 24th January 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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David Hart QC: TTIP – more ‘foreign’ judges critising ‘our’ laws? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted January 27th, 2015 in foreign companies, human rights, news, treaties, tribunals by sally

‘TTIP stands for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, a proposed trade agreement between the US, the EU, and various members of the EU including the UK. A sober account of its history and scope was produced for the HoC debate (here), and a rather less polite view is here from George Monbiot. ‘

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UK Human Rights Blog, 23rd January 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Prince Andrew: the legal issues – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted January 27th, 2015 in immunity, news, royal family, treaties, witnesses by sally

‘If the UK press love a sex scandal and a good royal story, imagine what you get when you put the two together. This month the news broke that victims of Jeffrey Epstein, an American paedophile, were attempting to sue Prince Andrew alleging, amongst other things, that she was coerced into having sex with him when she was 17.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 26th January 2015

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Dominic Grieve QC MP – Why It Matters that Conservatives Should Support the European Convention on Human Rights – UCL Constitution Unit

Posted December 11th, 2014 in attorney general, constitutional reform, human rights, news, speeches, treaties by sally

‘A British withdrawal from the European Convention of Human Rights would be “devastating for Britain and human rights throughout Europe, says Dominic Grieve, sacked as Attorney General by David Cameron in July.’

Video

UCL Constitution Unit, 10th December 2014

Source: www.ucl.ac.uk/constitution-unit

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In re S (A Child) (Abduction: Hearing the Child) – WLR Daily

Posted December 9th, 2014 in appeals, child abduction, children, custody, EC law, law reports, treaties by sally

In re S (A Child) (Abduction: Hearing the Child) [2014] EWCA Civ 1557; [2014] WLR (D) 522

‘Where the court was exercising it’s inherent jurisdiction relating to the abduction or retention of a child where neither the Hague Convention on the International Aspects of Child Abduction 1980, nor article 11(2) of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (“Brussels II revised”) applied, the same principle of effective access to justice for a child as applied to cases involving the Convention and the Regulation was engaged and the court was obliged to consider whether and how to hear the child concerned.’

WLR Daily, 4th December 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Venn v Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government and others – WLR Daily

Posted December 4th, 2014 in appeals, civil procedure rules, costs, news, treaties by sally

Venn v Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government and others [2014] EWCA Civ 1539; [2014] WLR (D) 513

‘Where a case fell within article 9(3) of the Aarhus Convention but was not a claim for judicial review and therefore not an “Aarhus Convention claim” within CPR r 45.41 it would be inappropriate for the court to relax the usual principles applying to the making of protective costs orders by nevertheless applying the costs protection regime introduced by rule 45.41.’

WLR Daily, 27th November 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Why domestic Aarhus rules are not wide enough to comply with the Convention – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Back to Aarhus and the constant problem we have in the UK making sure that the cost of planning and environmental litigation is not prohibitively expensive.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 1st December 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Anxious Scrutiny – Speech by Lord Sumption

Posted November 6th, 2014 in human rights, news, proportionality, speeches, treaties by sally

Anxious Scrutiny (PDF)

Lord Sumption

Administrative Law Bar Association Annual Lecture, 4th November 2014

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

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Haeger & Schmidt GmbH v Mutuelles du Mans assurances IARD (MMA IARD) and others – WLR Daily

Posted October 28th, 2014 in carriage of goods, conflict of laws, EC law, law reports, treaties by sally

Haeger & Schmidt GmbH v Mutuelles du Mans assurances IARD (MMA IARD) and others (Case C-305/13) ECLI:EU:C:2014:2320; [2014] WLR (D) 441

‘The last sentence of article 4(4) of the Convention on the Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations (Rome Convention) applied to a commission contract for the carriage of goods solely when the main purpose of the contract consisted in the actual transport of the goods concerned, which was for the referring court to verify. Where the law applicable to a contract for the carriage of goods could not be fixed under the second sentence of article 4(4), it had to be determined in accordance with the general rule laid down in article 4(1) that the law governing the contract was that of the country with which it was most closely connected. Where it was argued that a contract had a closer connection with a country other than that the law of which was designated by the presumption laid down in article 4(2), the national court had to compare the connections existing between that contract and the country whose law was designated by the presumption and the other country concerned. In so doing, the national court had to take account of the circumstances as a whole, including the existence of other contracts connected with the contract in question.’

WLR Daily, 23rd October 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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The UK in the European Convention: fudge, or a shining example? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 10th, 2014 in constitutional law, EC law, human rights, jurisdiction, news, treaties by sally

‘Last night’s discussion at Gray’s Inn Hall featured a panel with Dominic Grieve QC MP (formerly Attorney General), Lord Judge (formerly Lord Chief Justice), Bella Sankey (Policy Director, Liberty), Martin Howe QC (member of the Commission on a British Bill of Rights), David Anderson QC (Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation), all chaired by Shaun Ley of the BBC.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 9th October 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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