UK terrorism laws so broad it has begun to ‘catch those it never intended to’ – The Independent

Posted July 24th, 2014 in legislation, media, news, reports, terrorism by sally

‘UK anti-terrorism laws are so broadly drawn they are in danger of catching journalists, bloggers, and those it was “never intended to cover” the counter-terrorism watchdog has said.’

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The Independent, 22nd July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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UK definition of terrorism ‘could catch political journalists and bloggers’ – The Guardian

Posted July 23rd, 2014 in investigatory powers, news, statutory interpretation, terrorism by michael

‘The current British definition of terrorism is so broadly drawn that it could even catch political journalists and bloggers who publish material that the authorities consider dangerous to public safety, said the official counter-terrorism watchdog.’

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The Guardian, 22nd July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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DRIP: 5 unjust government arguments – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘It is suggested that the USA PATRIOT Act, legislation swiftly enacted by US Congress in the wake of the 11 September 2001 terrorist act was a “backronym” designed to play on the national pride around at the time. Clever political manoeuvring? Potentially so.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 16th July 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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‘On-the-run’ scheme flawed but not unlawful, inquiry finds – The Guardian

‘The post-Troubles scheme devised to reassure Irish republican “on-the-runs” (OTRs) that they were no longer wanted by the police was lawful and did not give terrorist suspects an amnesty, an independent review has concluded.’

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The Guardian, 17th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Terrorism laws watchdog issues warning over security services scrutiny – The Guardian

‘David Anderson says privacy and civil liberties board that is planned to replace his job must have unfettered access.’

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The Guardian, 17th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Emergency surveillance bill clears Commons – The Guardian

‘Controversial emergency surveillance legislation has cleared the Commons after an extended sitting and angry exchanges alleging an abuse of parliament.’

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The Guardian, 16th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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NSA surveillance data: UK access to information faces legal challenge – The Guardian

‘The biggest domestic legal challenge to UK intelligence agencies accessing the mass data harvested by the US National Security Agency (NSA) begins on Monday, and may be one reason behind the government’s decision to introduce emergency surveillance laws into parliament next week, campaigners have suggested.’

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The Guardian, 11th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Tribunal to hear legal challenge to GCHQ surveillance claims – BBC News

‘A tribunal is to hear a legal challenge by civil liberty groups against the alleged use of mass surveillance programmes by UK intelligence services.’

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BBC News, 14th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Emergency data law: What you need to know about the bill that makes ISPs store your data – The Independent

‘The Government has caused uproar this morning by introducing an emergency bill that forces telecom companies to store users’ personal data for 12 months despite the European Union ruling this April that such powers are illegal.’

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The Independent, 10th July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Surveillance law wins cross-party support but critics claim stitch-up – The Guardian

‘David Cameron and his Liberal Democrat deputy, Nick Clegg, have unveiled emergency surveillance legislation that will shore up government powers to require phone and internet companies to retain and hand over data to the security services.

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The Guardian, 10th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Ministers push for new legislation to track phone usage – The Guardian

‘Ministers are poised to pass emergency laws to require phone companies to log records of phone calls, texts and internet usage, but Labour and Liberal Democrats are warning that they will not allow any new law to become a backdoor route to reinstating a wider “snooper’s charter”.’

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The Guardian, 6th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Selected journalists to attend secret terror trial – the end of press freedom? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted June 20th, 2014 in closed material, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism by tracey

‘The application to have an entire trial held in secret caused a bit of a stir when news of the application was released earlier this month. The Court of Appeal has now permitted some of the hearing to be heard in public. This will probably be limited to the formalities at the start and end of the trial and parts of the Prosecution Opening.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 17th June 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Secret trials – a threat to justice? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted June 20th, 2014 in closed material, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism by tracey

‘Not since the long gone days of the Star Chamber has a case happened in secret with no reporting of the names of defendants, the charges, or the evidence. Whilst some element of secrecy is common place (see any trial with a youth or a sexual offence in the Crown Court for example) the idea that someone could be arrested, charged and potentially imprisoned without anyone beyond the immediate players knowing about it was anathema to the English lawyer.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 16th June 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Secret trial of terror suspects delayed until October – The Guardian

Posted June 17th, 2014 in delay, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism, trials by sally

‘The trial of two terrorist suspects, due to be held substantially in secret, has been delayed until October.’

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The Guardian, 16th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Come friendly bombs… – NearlyLegal

Posted June 16th, 2014 in insurance, landlord & tenant, leases, news, service charges, terrorism, tribunals by sally

‘Terrorism insurance is an increasingly contentious issue in service charge cases; in short, many leaseholders think it is unnecessary and simply serves to increase the their service charges (and, potentially, acts as an additional source of commission for landlords, itself a very contentious issue). Well, in Qdime Ltd v Various Leaseholders at Bath Building (Swindon) and others [2014] UKUT 261 (LC), the Upper Tribunal has given an unqualified endorsement of terrorism insurance and, in the process, may well have greatly extended the number of properties which are now required to obtain such insurance.’

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NearlyLegal, 13th June 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Secret trials – a little transparency, a lot to worry about – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal has published its decision in Guardian News Media v AB and CD. It is not a judgment, the Court says. Judgments – plural – will be given “in due course.” Still, the 24 paragraph decision contains the order and explanation of the order, and gives an indication of some of the reasons that will follow.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 12th June 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Trial of AB and CD part of creeping move towards secret justice – The Guardian

‘The case of AB and CD has been widely described as “Britain’s first secret trial”. It would be more accurately described as the latest of a number of creeping moves towards secret justice.’

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The Guardian, 12th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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‘Secret’ terror trial ruling due at Old Bailey – BBC News

‘The Court of Appeal is to rule on whether a trial of two terrorist suspects can be heard in secret.’

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BBC News, 12th June 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Friend of Lee Rigby’s killer jailed for disseminating pro-terrorism lectures – The Guardian

Posted June 9th, 2014 in inciting religious hatred, internet, news, sentencing, terrorism by sally

‘The “best friend” of Woolwich killer Michael Adebolajo has been jailed at the Old Bailey for encouraging terrorism in lectures he broadcast over the internet.’

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The Guardian, 6th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Secret terrorism trial runs risk of miscarriage of justice, says Sadiq Khan – The Guardian

‘Plans to hold the criminal trial of two men charged with serious terrorism offences entirely in secret runs the risk of creating a miscarriage of justice that will never be put right, the shadow justice secretary has warned.’

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The Guardian, 5th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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