EastEnders star Steve McFadden settles News of the World damages claim – The Guardian

Posted September 16th, 2014 in corruption, costs, damages, interception, media, news, police, telecommunications by tracey

‘Steve McFadden, the actor who plays Phil Mitchell in EastEnders, has settled his damages claim against the News of the World and the police over hacking and leaks about his private life to the paper.’

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The Guardian, 16th September 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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ICO needs to rethink how to tackle mobile apps privacy failings, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

‘The UK’s data protection authority needs to rethink its strategy for combatting failings in mobile apps privacy, an expert has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 12th September 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Andy Coulson eligible for move from Belmarsh prison – The Guardian

Posted August 15th, 2014 in conspiracy, interception, media, news, prisons, privacy, retrials, sentencing, telecommunications by tracey

‘Andy Coulson, David Cameron’s former director of communications, looks set to be moved from high-security Belmarsh prison after finally being classified as posing no risk to society.’

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The Guardian, 14th August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Ben Ashford found not guilty after trawling stolen phone for ‘flirty’ texts – The Guardian

Posted August 14th, 2014 in media, news, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘A former Sun journalist has walked free from the Old Bailey after he was cleared of all charges levelled against him after he looked through the contents of an iPhone that did not belong to him.’

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The Guardian, 13th August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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News International lawyers face tribunal over alleged hacking coverup – The Guardian

‘Two lawyers working for News International at the height of the phone hacking scandal are being prosecuted by the legal profession’s regulator for allegedly seeking to cover up the scale of criminality at the News of the World.’

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The Guardian, 9th August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK government to assess whether virtual currencies should be regulated – OUT-LAW.com

‘The UK government is to review the trade in virtual currencies to investigate whether it should regulated.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 6th August 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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DRIP – Data Retention Regulations come into force – Panopticon

‘The introduction of the controversial draft Data Retention Regulations 2014 has already been discussed by my colleague Robin Hopkins in his excellent post last month. The Regulations now have the force of law, having come into force on 31 July 2014 – see the Regulations here. In his post, Robin made the point that, following the judgment in Digital Rights Ireland, there were two methods for curtailing the infringement of privacy rights presupposed by the existing communications data retention (CDR) regime: either cut back on the data retention requirements provided for under the legislation, so as generally to limit the potential for interference with privacy rights, or introduce more robust safeguards with a view to ensuring that any interference with privacy rights is proportionate and otherwise justified. The Government, which has evidently opted for the latter approach in the new Regulations, will now need to persuade a somewhat sceptical public that the safeguards which have been adopted in the legislation strike the right balance as between the protection of privacy rights on the one hand and the imperative to support criminal law enforcement functions on the other.’

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Panopticon, 5th August 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Two men convicted for possessing extreme ‘WhatsApp porn’ that wasn’t viewed – The Independent

Posted August 5th, 2014 in guilty pleas, news, pornography, telecommunications by sally

‘Two men have been convicted for having “truly disgusting” pornographic images on their mobile phones, sent to them through the WhatsApp messaging service, though one claimed he didn’t watch what he was sent.’

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The Independent, 4th August 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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The death of privacy – The Guardian

‘Google knows what you’re looking for. Facebook knows what you like. Sharing is the norm, and secrecy is out. But what is the psychological and cultural fallout from the end of privacy?’

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The Guardian, 3rd August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Six years for woman who texted on two phones before fatal crash – The Independent

Posted August 1st, 2014 in dangerous driving, homicide, news, sentencing, telecommunications by sally

‘A judge condemned motorists who use mobiles while driving as a “plague on society” as he jailed a woman who caused a fatal pile-up after texting and taking calls on two phones while travelling at 70mph.’

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The Independent, 31st July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Driver jailed for killing a man while using two mobiles – The Guardian

Posted July 31st, 2014 in dangerous driving, homicide, news, sentencing, telecommunications by michael

‘A driver who killed a man while using two mobile phones behind the wheel has been jailed by a judge who branded such crimes “a plague on society”.’

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The Guardian, 31st July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Watchdog ‘desperate’ for ministers to crack down on nuisance calls and spam texts – Daily Telegraph

Posted July 30th, 2014 in compensation, electronic mail, news, nuisance, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘Victims of spam message companies could find it easier to win compensation under plans backed by the Information Commissioner’s Office’

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Daily Telegraph, 29th July 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Drip surveillance law faces legal challenge by MPs – The Guardian

‘The application for a judicial review of the new legislation, which was passed with support from the three main parties, is to be mounted by the human rights organisation Liberty on behalf of the two backbench MPs.’

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The Guardian, 22nd July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Teenagers who share ‘sexts’ could face prosecution, police warn – The Guardian

‘A police force has warned schoolchildren who share so-called “sexts” with friends over the internet that they could face prosecution in the criminal courts.’

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The Guardian, 22nd July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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DRIP: 5 unjust government arguments – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘It is suggested that the USA PATRIOT Act, legislation swiftly enacted by US Congress in the wake of the 11 September 2001 terrorist act was a “backronym” designed to play on the national pride around at the time. Clever political manoeuvring? Potentially so.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 16th July 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Will Drip law make UK citizens’ data more attractive to hackers? – The Guardian

‘The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers (Drip) bill that yesterday cleared the House of Lords will make companies holding UK citizens’ communications data far more attractive to criminal hackers, a security expert has warned.’

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The Guardian, 18th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Tom Hickman: Further Concerns about the DRIP Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In a blog post on Monday I expressed concerns about the lack of time for proper scrutiny of the changes to be brought in by the DRIP Bill. Towards the end of that blog I expressed puzzlement at a change to be made to the definition of “telecommunications system” in RIPA. This definition is central to the scheme of RIPA and is the basis for many of the powers therein.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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Peers criticise government over emergency data laws – BBC News

Posted July 17th, 2014 in bills, electronic mail, interception, news, parliament, telecommunications by tracey

‘The government has come under fire in the Lords over emergency legislation giving the security services access to people’s phone and internet records.’

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BBC News, 16th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Tom Hickman on the DRIP Bill: Plugging Gaps in Surveillance Laws or Authorising the Unlawful? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The unveiling last Thursday of a a draft bill on surveillance powers that is to be rushed through Parliament brought to mind the story of the Dutch boy who finds a hole in a dyke on his way to school and puts his finger in it to plug the leak until help arrives to shore it up. The legislation is said to be necessary to plug what the Government regards as holes in the regime of surveillance and investigatory powers pending a full review. The fact that the bill is titled the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill – the “DRIP” bill – may mean I am not the first person to draw the analogy. But the analogy may not be entirely apt. An examination of the DRIP Bill reveals that it is not addressing little holes in the regime but in fact profoundly important and substantial issues.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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Emergency data retention law could fail same tests as the existing law – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 15th, 2014 in bills, EC law, electronic mail, news, telecommunications by tracey

‘FOCUS: The new law proposed by the UK government to ensure that telecoms companies keep communications data for a year could be challenged in the same way as the court-revoked law it is replacing.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 15th July 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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