Analysis: Why can’t we sue the police for negligence? – BBC News

Posted January 29th, 2015 in appeals, human rights, immunity, negligence, news, police, public interest, Supreme Court by sally

‘You call the police in your moment of need and they don’t turn up until it’s too late.’

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BBC News, 28th January 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Family of woman killed by ex-partner loses battle to sue police for negligence – The Guardian

Posted January 29th, 2015 in appeals, domestic violence, families, immunity, murder, negligence, news, police, Supreme Court by sally

‘A family has lost its battle in the supreme court for the right to sue police for negligence over the death of a young mother killed by her ex-boyfriend in fit of jealous rage.’

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The Guardian, 28th January 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Attempt to ban performing artist’s abuse memoir ‘threatens free speech’ – The Guardian

Posted January 20th, 2015 in appeals, freedom of expression, injunctions, news, publishing, Supreme Court by sally

‘An attempt to prevent a performing artist from publishing his memoir on the grounds that its contents would be distressing for his son to read has opened up “a new, substantial and unpredictable threat to freedom of expression”, lawyers representing free speech campaigners have told the UK supreme court.’

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The Guardian, 19th January 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Neuberger and Dyson to head seven-judge panel for Coventry – Litigation Futures

Posted January 12th, 2015 in appeals, banking, child abuse, costs, fees, fraud, human rights, injunctions, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The president of the Supreme Court, Lord Neuberger, and Lord Dyson, the Master of the Rolls, will head a seven-judge panel for the eagerly awaited Coventry costs hearing on 9 February, it has been announced.’

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Litigation Futures, 9th January 2015

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Disabled tenants to challenge bedroom tax in supreme court – The Guardian

‘A legal case to be heard at the supreme court will decide whether the government’s housing benefit regulations – the bedroom tax – discriminates unfairly against disabled adults. The ruling could have consequences for hundreds of thousands of people.’

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The Guardian, 10th January 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Supreme Court to hear landmark licensing fees battle next week – Local Government Lawyer

Posted January 9th, 2015 in licensing, local government, news, sex establishments, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court will next week hear a case with major implications for local authorities and other regulators’ ability to charge fees for licences.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 9th January 2015

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

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The Separate Representation of Children in Child Abduction Proceedings – Family Law Week

Posted January 7th, 2015 in appeals, child abduction, children, delay, legal representation, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Esther Lieu, barrister of 3PB Chambers, explores how the role of children has developed Hague Convention child abduction proceedings.’

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Family Law Week, 6th January 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board v Doogan and another – WLR Daily

Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board v Doogan and another [2014] UKSC 68; [2014] WLR (D) 550

‘The right of conscientious objection under section 4(1) of the Abortion Act 1967 extended to the whole course of medical treatment which brought about the ending of a pregnancy including the medical and nursing care connected with the process, but only in relation to the actual looking after and treatment of the patient rather than the host of ancillary, administrative and managerial tasks associated with it.’

WLR Daily, 17th December 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10 – NearlyLegal

‘This was a judicial review of LB Enfield’s plans for borough wide additional HMO licensing and selective licensing of all PRS properties. It did not go well for Enfield, who appear to have not quite grasped the consultation requirements.’

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NearlyLegal, 3rd January 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Greater Glasgow Health Board (Appellant) v Doogan and another (Respondents) (Scotland) – Supreme Court

Greater Glasgow Health Board (Appellant) v Doogan and another (Respondents) (Scotland) [2014] UKSC 68 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 17th December 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Supreme Court justices debate decline in dissenting judgments – Litigation Futures

Posted December 19th, 2014 in judgments, judiciary, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘Better teamwork, smaller panels and less controversial cases have all been put forward by a seminar attended by Supreme Court justices and other senior judges as reasons for a decline in dissenting judgments at the court.’

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Litigation Futures, 19th December 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Supreme Court homeless appeals – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Three landmark appeals being heard this week should clarify who is ‘vulnerable’ and entitled to priority rehousing by local authorities.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 16th December 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Catholic midwives’ abortion ruling overturned by supreme court – The Guardian

Posted December 17th, 2014 in abortion, midwives, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The UK’s highest court has overturned a ruling made in favour of two Catholic midwives who object to any involvement in abortion procedures.’

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The Guardian, 17th December 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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QASA barristers in last throw of the dice with appeal to Supreme Court – Legal Futures

‘Four criminal law barristers have appealed to the Supreme Court in their judicial review of the Quality Assurance Scheme for Advocates (QASA) – despite a costs bill which already totals £215,000, Legal Futures can reveal.’

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Legal Futures, 17th December 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Tony Nicklinson’s widow takes right-to-die case to Europe – BBC News

Posted December 17th, 2014 in assisted suicide, human rights, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The widow of right-to-die campaigner Tony Nicklinson is taking his fight to the European Court of Human Rights.’

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BBC News, 16th December 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Suspending belief – Nearly Legal

Posted December 15th, 2014 in appeals, equity, land registration, landlord & tenant, mortgages, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘We have dealt with the basic facts in Scott v Southern Pacific Mortgages Ltd [2014] UKSC 52 when considering its previous incarnations (Cooke v Mortgage Business [2012] EWCA Civ 17 and Re North East Property Buyers Ltd [2010] EWHC 2991 (Ch)). In summary, the basic question for the Supreme Court was this: where a seller has agreed, prior to the contract of sale, that the buyer will grant the seller a tenancy after the sale, does the seller have that right so as not only to bind the buyer but also the buyer’s lender? I think, when framed as a question like that, the answer seems obvious. Call me a weak-kneed liberal, but all the equity (colloquially speaking) is in favour of the seller. They have entered in to the transaction on that basis and would not have entered in to the transaction otherwise. We all make bad deals which the law doesn’t get us out of, but the equity isn’t really in our favour: why should the law get us out of a bad deal?’

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Nearly Legal, 14th December 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Being Human Event – The Humanity of Judging – Supreme Court

Posted December 12th, 2014 in judiciary, news, Supreme Court by sally

Being Human Event – The Humanity of Judging (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 19th November 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Supreme Court finds third way between Strasbourg and House of Lords – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted December 12th, 2014 in human rights, imprisonment, news, rehabilitation, sentencing, Supreme Court by sally

‘Indeterminate sentences and the inadequate funding of rehabilitation during them has posed problems since Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences hamstrung the system. The courts here and in Strasbourg have been in two minds what to do about cases where prisoners have not received the assistance they ought to have received – and hence are not, by domestic standards, ready for release.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 11th December 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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A stunning decision on litigation costs: Coventry v Lawrence – Legal Week

Posted December 11th, 2014 in appeals, costs, human rights, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘In a stunning decision, the Supreme Court has given an indication that the pre-Jackson costs regime may breach the rights of paying parties under the European Convention of Human Rights. The issue has the potential to affect all agreements signed under the pre-April 2013 costs regime.’

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Legal Week, 11th December 2014

Source: www.legalweek.com

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R (on applications of Haney, Kaiyam, Massey and Robinson) v The Secretary of State for Justice – Supreme Court

Posted December 11th, 2014 in appeals, damages, human rights, law reports, rehabilitation, sentencing, Supreme Court by sally

R (on the application of Faisal Kaiyam) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for Justice (Respondent)
On appeal from the Court of Appeal (Civil Division) (England and Wales) [2014] UKSC 66
(YouTube)

Supreme Court, 10th December 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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