High court refuses to publish Ben Butler judgment from 2014 – The Guardian

‘A high court judge has refused to publish a 2014 judgment on the death of Ellie Butler on the grounds that her father, who has been jailed for life for her murder, might in the future face a retrial.’

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The Guardian, 22nd June 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Adult Defendant Anonymity in Criminal Proceedings – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted June 10th, 2016 in anonymity, news, reporting restrictions, trials by sally

‘Should defendant anonymity be granted to prevent reputational damage?
The current position for adult defendants is that the media will generally be able to report the name of a defendant facing a criminal charge. Anonymity will not be granted to defendants on the basis of embarrassment or stigma, harassment or economic loss caused by the publication of their name in criminal proceedings.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 9th June 2016

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Court of Protection orders continued reporting restrictions after death – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Protection has just ruled that where a court has restricted the publication of information during proceedings that were in existence during a person’s lifetime, it has not only the right but the duty to consider, when requested to do so, whether that information should continue to be protected following the person’s death.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 27th April 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Woman who died after ‘losing sparkle’ cannot be named, court rules – The Guardian

‘The court of protection has declined to name a 50-year-old woman who died after refusing life-saving kidney treatment because she said life had lost its “sparkle”.’

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The Guardian, 25th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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A judge’s sentence is not for entertainment – Daily Telegraph

Posted April 8th, 2016 in judiciary, media, news, public interest, reporting restrictions, sentencing by sally

‘Being appointed a judge is like going to school, one of our distinguished judges noted when he was first appointed. You have to sit in one place every day, all day. You have to listen to people addressing you, to take notes, and hand in your homework at the end.’

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Daily Telegraph, 7th April 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Angela Wrightson murder: How the media fought to report the case – BBC News

Posted April 7th, 2016 in internet, media, murder, news, reporting restrictions, retrials, trials by sally

‘The jury in the trial of two girls convicted of murdering a vulnerable woman heard graphic evidence of how they tortured and beat her to death. But the crime sparked such abusive comments on Facebook that a judge feared the girls could not have a fair hearing. He scrapped the case and ordered a retrial for the following year – leading to a seven-month fight by the media to be allowed to report on it. This is what happened.’

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BBC News, 7th April 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Crown courts to allow filming for first time – BBC News

‘TV cameras could be allowed into crown courts in England and Wales for the first time, as part of a pilot scheme proposed by the Ministry of Justice.’

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MOJ Press release

BBC News, 20th March 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Council tried to cover up failings after Poppi Worthington’s death – The Guardian

Posted March 3rd, 2016 in local government, news, reporting restrictions, social services by sally

‘A local authority criticised for failing to protect Poppi Worthington’s siblings for almost a year after her death did not discipline social workers and instead applied for a draconian order in an attempt to cover-up the failings, documents show.’

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The Guardian, 2nd March 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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More on media reporting of private court proceedings – Panopticon

‘The law on media reporting of private proceedings continues to develop with the decision of the Court of Appeal in Re W [2016] EWCA Civ 113. The decision arises out of the care proceedings that followed the death of 13-month old Poppi Worthington which attracted very high levels of public interest and media coverage.’

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Panopticon, 26th February 2016

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Reporting restrictions: When can you take notes in court? – BBC News

Posted February 16th, 2016 in courts, media, news, reporting restrictions by sally

‘As a reporter, I am used to getting out my notebook and writing down what’s said by witnesses, lawyers and judges.’

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BBC News, 16th February 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Press restrictions may continue after trial in the interests of national security – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted February 11th, 2016 in closed material, media, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism by sally

‘Terrorism has brought many changes in the ways in which we go about our lives. Many of these are quite minor, irritating but generally sensible. The holding of trials where much of the evidence is kept secret is not minor, and in principle must be considered an outrage rather than an irritant. But there are clearly occasions when this has to happen, and it is a great challenge to those who on the one hand have responsibility for preventing terrorism and those on the other hand responsible for ensuring that justice has been done.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 11th February 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Secret trial: One off – or the first of many? – BBC News

Posted February 10th, 2016 in closed material, news, reporting restrictions, terrorism, trials by sally

‘Possibly the worst headline I’ve ever written. But before I’m accused of completely failing to perform basic contractual duties, allow me to explain why those seven words are rather important.’

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BBC News, 10th February 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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An open or shut case? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R(C) v. Secretary of State for Justice [2016] UKSC 2. When is it right to keep the names of parties to litigation a secret? That was the difficult question the Supreme Court had to grapple with in this judgment, handed down on Wednesday. The decision to allow a double-murderer to remain anonymous led to outraged headlines in the tabloids. Yet the Court reached the unanimous conclusion that this was the right approach. Why?.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 29th January 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Court of Protection prepares to open up – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

‘A pilot scheme begins today which will see the public and media gain access to Court of Protection hearings across England and Wales for the first time.’

Full press release

Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 29th January 2016

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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Thalidomide 50 years on: ‘Justice has never been done and it burns away’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 7th, 2016 in compensation, health, media, medicines, news, reporting restrictions, victims by sally

‘It has been more than half a century since the thalidomide scandal, but Martin Fletcher finds that the victims’ fight for compensation is far from over.’

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Daily Telegraph, 7th January 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Court of protection extends ban on naming woman in right-to-die case – The Guardian

Posted December 10th, 2015 in anonymity, assisted suicide, media, news, public interest, reporting restrictions by sally

‘A legal ban preventing identification of a 50-year-old mother who died after refusing lifesaving kidney treatment has been extended by the court of protection.’

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The Guardian, 9th December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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That’s Entertainment? The Anonymity of Arrestees and the Law – Doughty Street

‘Last week, The Mirror reported that John Leslie was being questioned by police in connection with an alleged sexual assault. The report contained photographs of the police with evidence bags outside Leslie’s house. The Mirror reminded its readers of allegations made against the former TV presenter in 2002 and 2008. This the most recent example of media reports concerning allegations of sexual offences involving public figures.’

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Doughty Street, 2nd December 2015

Source: www.doughtystreet.co.uk

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Ban media from naming sex abuse suspects before charge, says top lawyer – The Guardian

‘A former top prosecutor has said parliament should pass a law banning the media from naming suspects in sex abuse cases until they are charged.’

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The Guardian, 20th October 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Lord chief justice: security services cannot be above the law – The Guardian

‘The accountability of MI5 and MI6 and the question of whether they are fully subject to the rule of law lie at the heart of attempts by the media to sweep away the secrecy surrounding a major terrorism trial, the lord chief justice said on Monday. In a series of remarks that disclosed publicly for the first time the role that the UK’s security and intelligence agencies played in imposing secrecy on the trial of Erol Incedal, a London law student, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd told the court of appeal that public confidence in the way they do their work was a key issue in the case.’

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The Guardian, 12th October 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Finance & Divorce Update October 2015 – Family Law Week

‘Edward Heaton, Principal Associate and Jane Booth, Associate, both of Mills & Reeve LLP analyse the news and case law relating to financial remedies and divorce during September 2015.’

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Family Law Week, 11th October 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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