Secret trial: One off – or the first of many? – BBC News

Posted February 10th, 2016 in closed material, news, reporting restrictions, terrorism, trials by sally

‘Possibly the worst headline I’ve ever written. But before I’m accused of completely failing to perform basic contractual duties, allow me to explain why those seven words are rather important.’

Full story

BBC News, 10th February 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on Secret trial: One off – or the first of many? – BBC News

An open or shut case? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R(C) v. Secretary of State for Justice [2016] UKSC 2. When is it right to keep the names of parties to litigation a secret? That was the difficult question the Supreme Court had to grapple with in this judgment, handed down on Wednesday. The decision to allow a double-murderer to remain anonymous led to outraged headlines in the tabloids. Yet the Court reached the unanimous conclusion that this was the right approach. Why?.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 29th January 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Comments Off on An open or shut case? – UK Human Rights Blog

Court of Protection prepares to open up – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

‘A pilot scheme begins today which will see the public and media gain access to Court of Protection hearings across England and Wales for the first time.’

Full press release

Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 29th January 2016

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

Comments Off on Court of Protection prepares to open up – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

Thalidomide 50 years on: ‘Justice has never been done and it burns away’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 7th, 2016 in compensation, health, media, medicines, news, reporting restrictions, victims by sally

‘It has been more than half a century since the thalidomide scandal, but Martin Fletcher finds that the victims’ fight for compensation is far from over.’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 7th January 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Comments Off on Thalidomide 50 years on: ‘Justice has never been done and it burns away’ – Daily Telegraph

Court of protection extends ban on naming woman in right-to-die case – The Guardian

Posted December 10th, 2015 in anonymity, assisted suicide, media, news, public interest, reporting restrictions by sally

‘A legal ban preventing identification of a 50-year-old mother who died after refusing lifesaving kidney treatment has been extended by the court of protection.’

Full story

The Guardian, 9th December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Court of protection extends ban on naming woman in right-to-die case – The Guardian

That’s Entertainment? The Anonymity of Arrestees and the Law – Doughty Street

‘Last week, The Mirror reported that John Leslie was being questioned by police in connection with an alleged sexual assault. The report contained photographs of the police with evidence bags outside Leslie’s house. The Mirror reminded its readers of allegations made against the former TV presenter in 2002 and 2008. This the most recent example of media reports concerning allegations of sexual offences involving public figures.’

Full story

Doughty Street, 2nd December 2015

Source: www.doughtystreet.co.uk

Comments Off on That’s Entertainment? The Anonymity of Arrestees and the Law – Doughty Street

Ban media from naming sex abuse suspects before charge, says top lawyer – The Guardian

‘A former top prosecutor has said parliament should pass a law banning the media from naming suspects in sex abuse cases until they are charged.’

Full story

The Guardian, 20th October 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Ban media from naming sex abuse suspects before charge, says top lawyer – The Guardian

Lord chief justice: security services cannot be above the law – The Guardian

‘The accountability of MI5 and MI6 and the question of whether they are fully subject to the rule of law lie at the heart of attempts by the media to sweep away the secrecy surrounding a major terrorism trial, the lord chief justice said on Monday. In a series of remarks that disclosed publicly for the first time the role that the UK’s security and intelligence agencies played in imposing secrecy on the trial of Erol Incedal, a London law student, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd told the court of appeal that public confidence in the way they do their work was a key issue in the case.’

Full story

The Guardian, 12th October 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Lord chief justice: security services cannot be above the law – The Guardian

Finance & Divorce Update October 2015 – Family Law Week

‘Edward Heaton, Principal Associate and Jane Booth, Associate, both of Mills & Reeve LLP analyse the news and case law relating to financial remedies and divorce during September 2015.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 11th October 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Comments Off on Finance & Divorce Update October 2015 – Family Law Week

DL v SL – WLR Daily

Posted October 2nd, 2015 in divorce, family courts, law reports, privacy, reporting restrictions by tracey

DL v SL: [2015] EWHC 2621 (Fam); [2015] WLR (D) 391

‘FPR r 27.10 incorporated a strong starting point or presumption, which should not be derogated from unless there was a compelling reason, that ancillary relief proceedings should be heard in private. The law concerning the presence of the media in such proceedings, contained in FPR r 27.11 and Practice Direction PD27B: Attendance of Media Representatives at Hearings in Family Proceedings, was to enable the press to be the eyes and ears of the public so as to ensure that the case was conducted fairly and to enable the public to be educated in an abstract and general way about the processes that were deployed, but did not extend to breaching the privacy of the parties in those proceedings that Parliament had given to them.’

WLR Daily, 27th July 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Comments Off on DL v SL – WLR Daily

Privacy in Financial Remedies Proceedings – Family Law Week

Posted October 2nd, 2015 in divorce, family courts, news, privacy, public interest, reporting restrictions by tracey

‘David Bedingfield, barrister, 4 Paper Buildings, considers conflicting judicial attitudes to the vexed question of rights to privacy in financial remedies proceedings.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 1st October 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Comments Off on Privacy in Financial Remedies Proceedings – Family Law Week

Judge criticises ‘chaotic’ rules on media coverage of divorce disputes – The Guardian

Posted September 29th, 2015 in divorce, injunctions, judges, media, news, regulations, reporting restrictions by sally

‘Regulations concerning media reporting of how divorcing couples divide up their disputed assets are chaotic, a senior family court judge has acknowledged.’

Full story

The Guardian, 28th September 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Judge criticises ‘chaotic’ rules on media coverage of divorce disputes – The Guardian

Gallagher-Appleton divorce triggers dispute over family court reporting – The Guardian

Posted September 23rd, 2015 in divorce, family courts, news, public interest, reporting restrictions by sally

‘The courtroom divorce battle between Liam Gallagher and Nicole Appleton has triggered a landmark legal dispute over what can be reported in the public’s interest from the family courts.’

Full story

The Guardian, 22nd September 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Gallagher-Appleton divorce triggers dispute over family court reporting – The Guardian

Court of Protection Update (September 2015) – Family Law Week

‘Sally Bradley and Julia Townend, barristers of 4 Paper Buildings, focus on the applicable law and procedure pertaining to reporting restriction orders in the Court of Protection generally and further to the recent judgment in A Healthcare NHS Trust v P & Q.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 16th September 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Comments Off on Court of Protection Update (September 2015) – Family Law Week

Permanent Anonymity and Restricted Reporting Orders – Littleton Chambers

Posted July 25th, 2015 in anonymity, employment tribunals, news, reporting restrictions by sally

‘The ET has the power to order that the identity of individuals named in proceedings be permanently anonymised in any judgment. This power has been expressly embodied in rule 50(3)(b) of the Tribunal Rules of Procedure 2013, although before this rule came into force a similar power already existed, to safeguard an individual’s rights under the European Convention of Human Rights: see F v G [2012] ICR 246.’

Full story

Littleton Chambers, 23rd July 2015

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

Comments Off on Permanent Anonymity and Restricted Reporting Orders – Littleton Chambers

Greater Transparency in Children Proceedings: A Note of Caution – Family Law week

‘Tom Wilson, pupil barrister at 1 Garden Court Family Law Chambers, examines the arguments in favour of greater transparency in the family justice system but sounds a note of caution.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 9th July 2015

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Comments Off on Greater Transparency in Children Proceedings: A Note of Caution – Family Law week

Council secures lifelong reporting restrictions order in favour of 17-year-old – Local Government Lawyer

‘Birmingham City Council has secured a lifelong reporting restrictions order (RRO) in favour of a 17-year-old woman, AB, who was sexually exploited by ten respondents to the proceedings.’

Full story

Local Government Lawyer, 2nd July 2015

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Comments Off on Council secures lifelong reporting restrictions order in favour of 17-year-old – Local Government Lawyer

Secret prosecution of terrorism suspect raises ‘difficult constitutional issues’ – The Guardian

‘The decisions that led to a terrorism suspect being prosecuted in conditions of almost unprecedented secrecy raise “really difficult constitutional issues” about the independence of prosecutors from government, the head of the judiciary in England and Wales warned on Wednesday.’

Full story

The Guardian, 1st July 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Secret prosecution of terrorism suspect raises ‘difficult constitutional issues’ – The Guardian

Court of Protection: Press will still need judge’s permission to attend hearings – The Independent

Posted June 29th, 2015 in Court of Protection, news, reporting restrictions by sally

‘Cases heard at Britain’s most secretive court will remain largely closed to public scrutiny after the Government decided not to change the law which obliges the media to apply in advance if they would like to attend.’

Full story

The Independent, 26th June 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Comments Off on Court of Protection: Press will still need judge’s permission to attend hearings – The Independent

Mother and son missing after custody ruling in Bristol – The Guardian

‘Judge takes exceptional step of lifting reporting restrictions to help find Rebecca and Ethan Minnock and reunite three-year-old with his father.’

Full story

The Guardian, 9th June 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Mother and son missing after custody ruling in Bristol – The Guardian