Cremation regulations – Ministry of Justice

Posted September 9th, 2016 in burials and cremation, press releases, regulations by tracey

‘Written Ministerial Statement made by the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Victims, Youth and Family Justice, Dr Phillip Lee.’

Full statement

Ministry of Justice, 8th September 2016

Source: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ministry-of-justice

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Data protection and Brexit – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted September 7th, 2016 in data protection, EC law, news, referendums, regulations by sally

‘UK data controllers are already grappling with the biggest change to EU protection in 20 years.’

Full story

Law Society’s Gazette, 5th September 2016

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Drones: flightpath to the future? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted September 6th, 2016 in aircraft, data protection, insurance, news, privacy, regulations by sally

‘Drones are rapidly being seen as a feature of the near future, because of the dramatic rise in their private use in the UK.’

Full story

Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 5th September 2016

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Drones: flightpath to the future? – Counsel

Posted September 1st, 2016 in aircraft, data protection, insurance, news, privacy, regulations by sally

‘Drones are rapidly being seen as a feature of the near future, because of the dramatic rise in their private use in the UK.’

Full story

Counsel, September 2016

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

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FSA: 4,000 major breaches of animal welfare laws at UK abattoirs in two years – The Guardian

Posted August 30th, 2016 in animal cruelty, food hygiene, news, regulations, reports, slaughter by sally

‘There were more than 4,000 severe breaches of animal welfare regulations over the past two years at British slaughterhouses, according to data released by the government’s food watchdog under freedom of information laws.’

Full story

The Guardian, 28th August 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Employment law: Post-Brexit – OUP Blog

Posted August 30th, 2016 in EC law, employment, news, referendums, regulations, transfer of undertakings by sally

‘The Leave vote in the EU referendum presents several potential challenges for employers which are of far more immediate and practical importance than speculation about the future direction of employment law in a post-EU environment. An issue over which a considerable amount of ink has been spilled, both before and after the referendum. These challenges include how employers should best seek to manage employee uncertainty and anxiety about the possible impact of the Leave vote on their business; how economic uncertainty will affect recruitment policy, perhaps pushing employers towards more temporary and agency and less permanent recruitment; the impact on employers’ ability to attract and retain skilled staff from overseas of potential changes to immigration laws as part of Brexit; how to reduce the risks of increased disputes in the workplace based on differing views of the merits of Brexit; and ensuring that any relocations or restructurings that the changed climate necessitates are handled so as to minimise exposure to claims. As the UK proceeds with the process of extracting itself from the EU, the impact on free movement and immigration laws will also be crucial for many employers.’

Full story

OUP Blog, 30th August 2016

Source: www.blog.oup.com

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Clearer on costs – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted August 25th, 2016 in costs, landlord & tenant, news, regulations, tribunals by sally

‘Rule 13(1) of the Tribunal Procedure (First-tier Tribunal)(Property Chamber) Rules 2013 (SI 2013/1169) provides that the Property Chamber of the First Tier Tribunal (FTT) may order costs(other than fees) in several limited circumstances. Of most interest to landlords, managing agents and others involved in FTT cases is r 13(1)(b), which provides for costs orders (in agricultural land and drainage, residential property or leasehold cases) “if a person has acted unreasonably in bringing, defending, or conducting proceedings”.’

Full story

Hardwicke Chambers, 5th August 2016

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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Unreasonable Conduct in the First-tier Tribunal – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted July 26th, 2016 in appeals, news, regulations, service charges, tribunals by sally

‘On 22 June 2016, the Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) gave judgment in three conjoined appeals concerning the proper interpretation of Rule 13 of the Tribunal Procedure (First-tier Tribunal) (Property Chamber) Rules 2013; four members of Hardwicke appeared in the case. The appeals shared a number of facts: each arose out of a dispute over service charges payable under the lease of a flat; each concerned a dispute between a lessee and a tenant owned management company; and in each the award of costs was greater than the amount of service charge in issue in the proceedings.’

Full story

Hardwicke Chambers, 14th July 2016

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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New tough charity regulator to name and shame bullying ‘chuggers’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted July 7th, 2016 in charities, codes of practice, news, regulations, reports by sally

‘Charity fundraisers who harass the elderly and shoppers in street will be “named and shamed” by a tougher new regulator to be launched today.’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 7th July 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Half of police officers facing gross misconduct charges quit force before case heard – The Guardian

‘Half of police officers facing gross misconduct investigations in the past two years resigned or retired before their cases were heard, figures show.’

Full story

The Guardian, 4th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Trade bodies publish new market abuse guidance to replace Model Code – OUT- LAW.com

‘Guidance and specimen policy documents to help quoted companies comply with new market abuse rules when dealing in shares have been published by the UK’s main trade bodies for governance professionals and general counsel.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 29th June 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

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Immigration advisers using McKenzie Friend status “to dodge regulation” – Legal Futures

‘People are avoiding regulation as immigration advisers by “purportedly acting as McKenzie Friends”, the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) has warned.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 8th June 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Richard Kirkham: JR55: Five Activist Strategies a Judge Should Avoid – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The ruling of the Supreme Court in JR55 raises a host of issues which deserve a much fuller analysis than can be developed in this post. The best reading of the case is that its impact is largely isolated to the Northern Ireland Commissioner for Complaints scheme involved, an ombudsman scheme which closed on 1st April as a result of the Public Services Ombudsman Act (Northern Ireland) 2016.’

Full story

UK Constitutional Law Association, 30th May 2016

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Legal Services Board makes the case for regulatory independence – Legal Futures

‘The lack of independence between the legal regulators and representative bodies risks undermining the credibility of regulation and allows the likes of the Law Society and Bar Council to delay reforms that would benefit competition, the Legal Services Board (LSB) said yesterday.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 11th May 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Infants in Arms – Do babies pay their way? – 4 KBW

Posted April 26th, 2016 in airlines, children, competition, EC law, news, regulations by sally

‘In two recent decisions, the County Court at Liverpool has held that infants carried in the arms of another passenger were not themselves fare-paying passengers, but had in fact travelled for free. As a consequence, the infants were not eligible for the fixed compensation available to fare-paying passengers under the Regulation (EC) No. 261/2004 (“the Regulation”).’

Full story

4 KBW, 22nd April 2016

Source: www.4kbw.net

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Cosmetic treatment industry given strict rules to protect vulnerable – The Guardian

‘Doctors carrying out cosmetic treatments must avoid two-for-one offers and allow a minimum two-week cooling-off period before surgery or risk being struck off, under long-awaited guidance to protect patients who may be vulnerable.’

Full story

The Guardian, 12th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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The Duke and Duchy of Cornwall and the EIRs – Panopticon

‘The Duchy of Cornwall was established by Edward III in 1337 for his son. There is a landed estate (the Duchy) and a title (the Duke). Edward III was no doubt unconcerned about any legal duties that may attach to the Duchy; he had bigger fish to fry. In the 21st century, however, at least one knotty question of legal duty has surfaced.’

Full story

Panopticon, 5th April 2016

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Government planning to repeal animal welfare codes – The Guardian

Posted March 29th, 2016 in agriculture, animal cruelty, codes of practice, food, news, regulations, repeals by sally

‘Conservative ministers are planning to repeal an array of official guidance on animal welfare standards, starting with a move to put the code on chicken-farming into the hands of the poultry industry.’

Full story

The Guardian, 25th March 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Lords curbs will tilt balance of power towards government, say peers – BBC News

Posted March 23rd, 2016 in news, parliament, regulations, veto by tracey

‘Government plans to remove the House of Lords’ ability to veto some draft laws would “tilt the balance of power… towards government”, peers have said. A review of the Lords’ powers was set up after peers voted down planned tax credits cuts – later axed by ministers. But its scope has been criticised by two Lords committees who say its proposals would “damage” Parliament’s role and should be shelved.’

Full story

BBC News, 23rd March 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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A bolt out of the blue – another winning strike for delayed flight claimants – No. 5 Chambers

Posted March 22nd, 2016 in airlines, appeals, compensation, delay, news, regulations by sally

‘In January, there was yet another twist in the plot of the ever-developing law regarding delayed flights. This time it came from Her Honour Judge Melissa Clarke, sitting at Luton County Court, in the matter of Evans v Monarch Airlines.’

Full story

No. 5 Chambers, 16th March 2016

Source: www.no5.com

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