Hacking trial: Legal battle set to cost taxpayers millions of pounds – The Independent

Posted July 2nd, 2014 in appeals, conspiracy, costs, fees, interception, media, news, privacy, prosecutions by sally

‘A legal battle between Rupert Murdoch’s News UK and England’s prosecuting authorities over the “astronomical” costs of the record-breaking phone hacking trial will involve “millions of pounds of taxpayers’ money”.’

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The Independent, 1st July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Facebook faces UK probe over emotion study – BBC News

Posted July 2nd, 2014 in consent, data protection, internet, news, privacy, select committees by sally

‘A UK regulator is investigating whether Facebook broke data protection laws when it conducted a psychological study on users without their consent.’

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BBC News, 2nd July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Andy Coulson and Clive Goodman face re-trial – BBC News

‘Andy Coulson and Clive Goodman are to face a re-trial on a charge that they bought royal telephone directories from police officers.’

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BBC News, 30th June 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Phone hacking: it was right to charge Rebekah Brooks, says Keir Starmer – The Guardian

‘Prosecutors were right to charge Rebekah Brooks and other News of the World executives over conspiracy to hack phones as the trials have helped determine who knew about widespread malpractice at the newspaper, Sir Keir Starmer, the former director of public prosecutions, has said.’

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The Guardian, 29th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Mini-pupils in chambers: legal and ethical issues – The Bar Council

Posted June 27th, 2014 in data protection, news, privacy, professional conduct, pupillage by tracey

‘The Bar Council’s Professional Practice Committee (PPC) has published a new document covering mini-pupils.’

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The Bar Council, 26th June 2014

Source: www.barcouncil.org.uk

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Britain’s intelligence agencies are told to make privacy invasion assessment – The Guardian

Posted June 27th, 2014 in detention, intelligence services, news, privacy by tracey

‘Britain’s security and intelligence agencies should consider how far they are invading people’s privacy when they seek permission for intrusive surveillance, their government-appointed watchdog has recommended.’

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The Guardian, 26th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK Supreme Court: forcing disclosure of minor or spent convictions not “necessary or proportionate” – OUT-LAW.com

‘Requiring applicants for those jobs which require enhanced criminal record checks to disclose all spent convictions no matter how historic or minor is an unnecessary and disproportionate interference with their human rights, the UK’s Supreme Court has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 25th June 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Regina (T) v Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police and others (Liberty and others intervening); Regina (B) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Same intervening) – WLR Daily

Regina (T) v Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police and others (Liberty and others intervening); Regina (B) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Same intervening) [2014] UKSC 35; [2014] WLR (D) 271

‘The provisions in Part V of the Police Act for the automatic release of a person’s convictions, cautions and warnings— regardless of their relevance or the length of time that had elapsed— when that person was required, by reason of articles 3 or 4 of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975, to obtain and disclose an enhanced criminal record certificate for the purpose of obtaining employment or some other position which involved working with children or other vulnerable groups of persons, did not meet the requirement of legality for the purposes of article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and so was incompatible with the person’s right to respect for their private life guaranteed by that article. Moreover, the provisions contravened article 8 in that they were not “necessary in a democratic society”, as required by article 8.2.’

WLR Daily, 18th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Tribunal upholds decision to overturn ICO fine for unsolicited marketing activities – OUT-LAW.com

Posted June 24th, 2014 in advertising, appeals, fines, news, privacy, tribunals by sally

‘The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has lost its appeal against a decision to overturn a £300,000 monetary penalty it served on an individual for his part in what the watchdog claimed was a serious breach of UK privacy laws.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 23rd June 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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High Court: provision of reference containing details of uncompleted disciplinary action was “unfair” use of personal data – OUT-LAW.com

‘Whether it is “fair” to share an individual’s personal data for lawful public policy reasons requires a careful balancing of the interests of that individual and the interests of others, including the public interests, the High Court in England has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 23rd June 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Criminal records scheme incompatible with Convention rights – Supreme Court judgment – Panopticon

‘As readers of this blog will know, the application of the Government’s criminal records scheme has been subject to extensive litigation of late (see further not least my post on an appeal involving a teacher and my post on an appeal involving a taxi-driver). Perhaps most importantly, in the case of T & Anor v Secretary of State for the Home Department, questions have been raised about whether the scheme as a whole is compatible with Convention rights and, in particular, the Article 8 right to privacy. Last year, the Court of Appeal concluded that the scheme was incompatible. In a judgment given yesterday, the majority of the Supreme Court has agreed with that conclusion (Lord Wilson dissenting).’

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Panopticon, 19th June 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Government’s defence of surveillance unconvincing, says ex-watchdog – The Guardian

Posted June 19th, 2014 in intelligence services, interception, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘The government’s arguments for justifying the mass monitoring of the internet are “unconvincing” and based on exploiting “loopholes” in legislation, the former chief surveillance inspector has said.

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The Guardian, 18th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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R (on the application of T and another) (Respondents) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Appellants) – Supreme Court

R (on the application of T and another) (Respondents) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and another (Appellants) [2014] UKSC 35 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 18th June 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Do Not Resuscitate notices: Patients’ rights under Article 8 – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal has declared that the failure of a hospital to consult a patient in their decision to insert a Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Notice in her notes was unlawful and in breach of her right to have her physical integrity and autonomy protected under Article 8.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 17th June 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Criminal records: Supreme Court to rule whether job applicants have to come clean over convictions – The Independent

‘The Supreme Court is today due to rule whether job applicants should be forced to disclose all convictions to certain potential employers.’

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The Independent, 18th June 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Mass surveillance of social media is permitted by law, says top UK official – The Guardian

‘Mass surveillance of social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, and even Google searches, is permissible because these are “external communications”, according to the government’s most senior security official.’

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The Guardian, 17th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Nominet’s new rules on .uk domains could mean the end to users’ privacy – The Guardian

Posted June 12th, 2014 in disclosure, domain names, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Since Tuesday, running a personal website has become a privacy minefield for people using .uk domain names. A recent rule change by Nominet, the company which manages the .uk registry, means that domain name owners whose home addresses were previously kept private may now be publicly visible in online searches. People setting up domain names through Nominet must now also show their full legal personal or business name on the public registration database.’

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The Guardian, 11th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Failing to Make Crime Pay – BBC Law in Action

Posted June 5th, 2014 in artistic works, internet, news, privacy, proceeds of crime by sally

‘The government wants to do more to recover criminal assets. Joshua Rozenberg asks why – till now, at least – it has proved so difficult to deprive villains of their loot.’

Listen

BBC Law in Action, 3rd June 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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How to get Google to remove outdated links to your personal data – RPC Privacy Law

Posted June 3rd, 2014 in data protection, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Google has today announced how it intends to deal with the European Court’s judgment in the Google Spain case. In today’s Financial Times Google’s CEO, Larry Page, has confirmed that Google will take steps to recognise individuals’ “right to be forgotten” in appropriate cases. It will do so by introducing an online mechanism for users to request the removal from search results of links to data that are outdated.’

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RPC Privacy Law, 30th May 2014

Source: www.rpc.co.uk

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Publisher not forced to delete archived article on man’s spent conviction – OUT-LAW.com

Posted May 22nd, 2014 in data protection, media, news, privacy, publishing by sally

‘Newspaper publisher Newsquest does not have to remove an old article from its online archive which reports on the conviction of a man for fraud, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 21st May 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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