Phone hacking at Trinity Mirror ‘widespread’ for a decade, says judge – The Guardian

Posted May 22nd, 2015 in compensation, interception, media, news, privacy, telecommunications, victims by sally

‘Phone hacking at the tabloid publisher Trinity Mirror was “widespread and frequent” for a decade, a high court judge has ruled as he ordered the company to pay a record £1.2m in privacy damages to eight victims, including the actor Sadie Frost and ex-footballer Paul Gascoigne.’

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The Guardian, 21st May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Phone hacking: Paul Gascoigne wins damages from Mirror Group – BBC News

Posted May 21st, 2015 in appeals, damages, interception, media, news, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘Former footballer Paul Gascoigne has won £188,250 in phone-hacking damages from Mirror Group Newspapers.’

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BBC News, 21st May 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Intelligence agencies can hack computers without breaking UK laws – OUT-LAW.com

‘The UK government changed the law to enable intelligence agencies to engage in computer hacking without being said to be in breach of the Computer Misuse Act, privacy campaigners have claimed. The government has said the powers were already in existence and that the reforms merely serve to clarify the legal position.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 18th May 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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Mosley v Google: RIP – Panopticon

Posted May 19th, 2015 in data protection, EC law, human rights, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘So Max Mosley has done a deal with Google in respect of his claim that Google had breached his rights under the DPA 1998 by refusing to block certain images and videos accessible via the Google search engine (see this FT article which suggests that the settlement also applies to claims brought by Mr Mosley in Germany and France). The settlement of the claim, which follows on from Google’s failed strike out application (discussed further below), leaves unanswered a number of really important questions concerning the application of data protection rights in the online world. Not least, the settlement leaves open the question of the extent to which the so-called ‘right to be forgotten’ can operate so as to force internet search engines, not only to de-index individual URLs on request, but also to block access to the offending data globally (i.e. as ISEs already do, for example, where images of child pornography are identified).’

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Panopticon, 18th May 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Operation Elveden: Ex-prison officer jailed for celebrity tips – BBC News

‘A former prison officer has been jailed for 10 months for selling “salacious gossip” about celebrity inmates to two national newspapers.’

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BBC News, 15th May 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Court exceeded its power in ordering publication of Charles memos – Straw – The Guardian

‘Jack Straw, a former Labour cabinet minister and one of the architects of the Freedom of Information Act, has said that the Prince of Wales’s memos to ministers should have remained secret and that the supreme court exceeded its power in backing the Guardian’s fight for publication.’

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The Guardian, 14th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Retention of offenders’ DNA profiles not illegal, supreme court rules – The Guardian

Posted May 14th, 2015 in appeals, DNA, human rights, news, police, privacy, proportionality by tracey

‘Retaining DNA profiles of convicted adults indefinitely is not an illegal breach of their privacy, the supreme court has ruled in a test case involving a Northern Ireland drink driver. he judgment by the UK’s highest court sets a significant precedent in making a clear distinction between information that police forces may keep on those who have been convicted, as opposed to those who were merely suspects.’

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The Guardian, 13th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Using photographs from social media—rights of privacy – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted May 13th, 2015 in complaints, consent, internet, media, news, photography, privacy by tracey

‘The Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) recently upheld a complaint against a newspaper after it published an image taken from social media without consent.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 13th May 2015

Source: wwww.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Information Commissioner’s Office to review privacy in children’s apps – The Guardian

Posted May 13th, 2015 in children, computer programs, data protection, news, privacy by tracey

‘Children’s apps and websites are in the spotlight on privacy grounds again, after the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) announced a review of how these services collect data on their young users.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Birth certificate cannot be retrospectively changed to reflect father’s gender reassignment – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted April 24th, 2015 in birth certificates, human rights, news, privacy, transsexuals by sally

‘This case concerned the rights of transgender women, and their families, in particular the right to keep private the fact that they are transgender.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 23rd April 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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“Cold Calling” company fined £75K for breach of privacy – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted April 20th, 2015 in advertising, complaints, consumer protection, EC law, fines, news, privacy, tribunals by sally

‘Although an individual’s right to privacy is usually thought of in the context of state intrusion in one form or another, in reality the real threat of intrusion in a society such as ours comes from unsolicited marketing calls.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 17th April 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Tribunal increases ICO fine over unsolicited marketing by 50% – OUT-LAW.com

Posted April 17th, 2015 in electronic mail, fines, news, privacy, telecommunications, tribunals by sally

‘A UK court has increased the level of fine imposed on a business which made unsolicited marketing calls to people signed up to the Telephone Preference Service (TPS) by 50%.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 17th April 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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R (on the application of Evans) and another (Respondents) v Attorney General (Appellant) – Supreme Court

R (on the application of Evans) and another (Respondents) v Attorney General (Appellant) [2015] UKSC 21 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 26th March 2015

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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University admissions service broke data laws over targeted advertising – The Guardian

Posted April 9th, 2015 in advertising, data protection, news, privacy, universities, young persons by sally

‘The universities admissions service, Ucas, broke data protection rules when it signed up teenagers to receive adverts about mobile phones, energy drinks and other products, the information commissioner has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 8th April 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Vidal-Hall v Google Inc (Information Commissioner intervening) – WLR Daily

Vidal-Hall v Google Inc (Information Commissioner intervening) [2015] EWCA Civ 311; [2015] WLR (D) 156

‘A claim for misuse of private information should be categorised as a tort for the purposes of service of proceedings out of the jurisdiction.’

WLR Daily, 18th March 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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More fines for unsolicited calls or texts likely, says ICO, as new rules come into force – OUT-LAW.com

‘Changes to the rules governing when the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) can fine companies for making unsolicited telephone calls or sending unsolicited text messages will help the UK’s privacy watchdog to “make more fines stick”, it has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 7th April 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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Facebook ‘tracks all visitors, breaching EU law’ – The Guardian

Posted April 1st, 2015 in computer programs, consent, data protection, EC law, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Facebook tracks the web browsing of everyone who visits a page on its site even if the user does not have an account or has explicitly opted out of tracking in the EU, extensive research commissioned by the Belgian data protection agency has revealed.’

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The Guardian, 31st March 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Google and the DPA – RIP section 13(2) – Panopticon

Posted March 30th, 2015 in appeals, damages, data protection, freedom of information, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Well, isn’t this an exciting week (and I don’t mean Zayn leaving One Direction)? First, Evans and now Vidal-Hall. We only need Dransfield to appear before Easter and there will be a full red bus analogy. Robin opened yesterday’s analysis of Evans by remarking on the sexiness of FOIA. If there is one thing you learn quickly as an information law practitioner, it is not to engage in a sexiness battle with Robin Hopkins. But high-profile though Evans is, the judgment in Vidal-Hall will be of far wider significance to anyone having to actually work in the field, rather than simply tuning every now and then to see the Supreme Court say something constitutional against a FOIA background. Vidal-Hall might not be the immediate head-turner, but it is probably going to be the life-changer for most of us. So, while still in the ‘friend zone’ with the Court of Appeal, before it all gets serious, it is important to explain what Vidal-Hall v Google [2015] EWCA Civ 311 does.’

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Panopticon, 27th March 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Google loses UK appeal court battle over ‘clandestine’ tracking – The Guardian

Posted March 30th, 2015 in appeals, consumer protection, damages, data protection, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Google has failed in its attempt in the court of appeal to prevent British consumers having the right to sue the internet firm in the UK.’

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The Guardian, 27th March 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Is privacy dead? – OUP Blog

Posted March 24th, 2015 in data protection, EC law, human rights, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘In 1980, personal computers were still in their infancy, and the internet did not exist. There were, of course, genuine concerns about threats to our privacy, but, looking back at my book of that year, they mostly revolved around telephone tapping, surveillance, and unwanted press intrusion. Data protection legislation was embryonic, and the concept of privacy as a human right was little more than a chimera.’

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OUP Blog, 20th March 2015

Source: http://blog.oup.com

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