Credit Hire – Defendant Entitled To Summary Judgment When Claimant Could Not Establish Need – Zenith PI Blog

‘HHJ Armstrong refused the Claimant’s application for permission to appeal the decision of District Judge Read that the Defendant was entitled to summary judgment when the Claimant could not establish need in relation to a vehicle he had hired.’

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Zenith PI Blog, 27th April 2016

Source: www.zenithpi.wordpress.com

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Claim against MIB does not have protection of QOCS, High Court rules – Litigation Futures

‘A claim against the Motor Insurance Bureau (MIB) by the victim of an accident in France does not have the protection of qualified one-way costs shifting (QOCS), the High Court has ruled.

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Litigation Futures, 26th April 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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No escape from dishonesty hearing for claimant who discontinued – Litigation Futures

Posted April 27th, 2016 in costs, fraud, news, personal injuries, proportionality by sally

‘A personal injury claimant cannot escape a fundamental dishonesty hearing by serving a notice of discontinuance, a circuit judge has held.’

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Litigation Futures, 27th April 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Footballer found guilty of contempt of court – Attorney General’s Office

‘A semi-professional footballer who was caught tweeting about playing football 24 hours after making a dishonest insurance claim for whiplash today admitted contempt of court.’

Full press release

Attorney General’s Office, 15th April 2016

Source: www.gov.uk/ago

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Webb (by her litigation friend) v Liverpool Women’s NHS Foundation Trust – WLR Daily

Posted April 20th, 2016 in costs, indemnities, law reports, negligence, personal injuries by sally

Webb (by her litigation friend) v Liverpool Women’s NHS Foundation Trust [2016] EWCA Civ 365

‘The claimant succeeded in her claim against the defendant for medical negligence in the management of her birth, during which she suffered a Brachial Plexus Injury as a result of shoulder dystocia. The claimant had earlier made a CPR Pt 36 offer to settle liability on the basis that she received 65% of the damages that would accrue on a 100% basis, which had been rejected by the defendant. The judge upheld the first allegation under the claim, namely that the defendant had been negligent in not performing a caesarean section during the claimant’s delivery and held that as she had succeeded in establishing that her injury was caused by the defendant’s negligence, she was accordingly entitled to 100% of her claimed damages even though she had been unsuccessful in other specific allegations, including a freestanding second limb of the claim that the delivery itself was negligently managed. On the issue of costs, the claimant contended that because of the defendant’s refusal to accept the Part 36 offer of settlement which had been bettered by the claimant, the consequences of what was then CPR r 36.14(3) (now CPR r 36.17, as amended by The Civil Procedure (Amendment No 8) Rules (SI 2014/3299), reg 7, Sch 1) applied and as a result the court was unable to make an issues-based order, Part 36 comprising as it did an all or nothing self-contained regime; and that she should have all her costs on an indemnity basis from the expiry of the relevant period plus interest thereon at the enhanced “Part 36 rate” plus the enhancements specified in Part 36.14(3)(a) and (d). The defendant submitted that the normal cost consequences of CPR r 36.14(3) should be disapplied because, by reference to CPR r 36.14(4), in the circumstances, it would be unjust to apply them; that CPR Part 36 did not prevent the court from making an issues-based or proportionate costs order to reflect the fact that the claimant failed in respect of the second allegation, which was a discrete and independent allegation and that such an order was appropriate; and that therefore the claimant’s costs referable to the first allegation should be awarded with the CPR Part 36 enhancements but not those in respect of the unsuccessful second allegation. The judge held that (a) the engagement of the CPR Pt 36 cost consequences did not preclude the court from making an issues-based or proportionate costs order and the court had a discretion to make such an order, notwithstanding that the claimant was a successful claimant; and (b) that, in the circumstances of the case, it was just to make an issues-based proportionate costs order, under which the claimant would not recover her costs of the second allegation. He ordered that the claimant should recover her damages to be assessed with the 10% addition required by CPR r 36.14(3)(d), plus her costs, excluding those referable to the second allegation and that those costs, incurred after 22 October 2014, were to be assessed on an indemnity basis pursuant to CPR r 36.14(3)(d). The claimant appealed on the grounds that (a) on the true construction of Part 36, the discretion of the court under CPR r 36.14(3) was restricted to the enhancements to which a successful claimant was normally entitled in respect of damages, costs and interest, that the court did not have power under Part 36 to deprive a party of part of its costs on the basis that it had failed to establish part of its claim and that Part 36 excluded the normal discretion of the court to make an issues-based or proportionate costs order; (b) alternatively, that a successful claimant could only be deprived of her costs if it was shown that it would be unjust for her to recover all her costs; and (c) that the judge had erred in law in deciding that he could and should deprive the claimant of her costs attributable to the second allegation.’

WLR Daily, 14th April 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Down the Rabbit Hole of Genetic Testing – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The explosion of genetic testing in the last half century has produced unquantifiable benefits, allowing scientists to understand the constitution of genetic disorders and dramatically improve disease diagnosis, avoidance and treatment. Consider the near-eradication of Tay-Sachs, a fatal neurodegenerative disease, since the introduction of screening in the 1970s; the standardisation of newborn testing; and the introduction of BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for inherited cancer genes.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 19th April 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Court heaps landmark contempt sentence on whiplash cheat – Litigation Futures

‘A semi-professional footballer who brought a fake whiplash claim has suffered twice over after a four-month suspended sentence for contempt was heaped on an £11,000 costs order for bringing a fundamentally dishonest claim.’

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Litigation Futures, 19th April 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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PI victim gets 100% costs – despite failing with one allegation – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The Court of Appeal has ruled that a claimant should be awarded full costs of bringing her case despite losing on one of the issues.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 15th April 2015

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Court of Appeal overturns issues-based part 36 offer – Litigation Futures

‘Judges can make issues-based costs orders under part 36 but only if it is unjust to deprive a successful claimant of all or part of their costs, the Court of Appeal has ruled in overturning such an order.’

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Litigation Futures, 15th April 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Adding Insult to Injury – Byrom Street Chambers

Posted April 14th, 2016 in damages, disabled persons, news, personal injuries by sally

‘This paper seeks to explore how causation and quantum should be determined where a pre-existing injury is worsened, or an additional injury is super imposed upon a pre-existing injury, by a Defendant’s negligence.’

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Byrom Street Chambers, 30th March 2016

Source: www.byromstreet.com

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Opportunity doesn’t knock twice: recovering damages for consequential loss – Hardwicke Chambers

‘Today’s banks are in receipt of the largest fines ever imposed by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), or its predecessor the Financial Services Authority (FSA), and although they are taking responsibility for a number of failings (eg PPI, Derivatives, LIBOR and FOREX), restrictions on recovering loss, in particular where consequential loss is concerned, have come under significant scrutiny. This article examines the measure of loss in tort and contract, and particularly explores investors’ difficulties when making claims for loss of profit caused by mis selling.’

Full story

Hardwicke Chambers, 31st March 2016

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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Musician sues Royal Opera House over ruined hearing – BBC News

Posted April 1st, 2016 in health & safety, news, noise, personal injuries by sally

‘A renowned viola player is suing the Royal Opera House for ruining his hearing and his career during rehearsals of Wagner’s Die Walkure.’

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BBC News, 1st April 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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The law of vicarious liability is on the move… and hasn’t finished moving yet – Zenith PI Blog

Posted March 23rd, 2016 in negligence, news, personal injuries, prisons, vicarious liability by tracey

‘“The law of vicarious liability is on the move”, so began Lord Reed in his judgment in Cox -v- Ministry of Justice [2016] UKSC 10.’

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Zenith PI, 23rd March 2016

Source: www.zenithpi.wordpress.com

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Same Accident, Same Defendant, Two Separate CNFs (One Claiming Vehicle Damage and Credit Hire; the Other PI) Proceed as Separate Claims at all Times, One Settles After Issue, the Other Does Not and is Issued – Abuse of Process or Not? – Zenith PI Blog

Posted March 22nd, 2016 in abuse of process, accidents, costs, news, personal injuries, striking out by sally

‘Last week I went off to the County Court at Newcastle to defend a strike out application made by the Defendant alleging abuse of process. I suspect this won’t be the first time that this factual scenario has arisen where defendants have sought to strike out a claim and where they have been successful, but here the claim was allowed to proceed because it was found that there was no abuse.’

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Zenith PI Blog, 21st March 2016

Source: www.zenithpi.wordpress.com

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Bannisters that never were – Nearly Legal

‘You wait for 4 years for another case on bannisters and the Defective Premises Act 1972 and then two come along at once…

Sternbaum v Dhesi [2016] EWCA Civ 155

Dodd v Raebarn Estates Ltd & Ors [2016] EWHC 262 (QB)

Both can be dealt with fairly quickly and together, as the courts follow the same lines. Both cases involved falls on stairs, very sadly in Dodd, a fatal fall. In each case, there was no bannister to the staircase. Both claims were on appeal from being dismissed at first instance.’

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Nearly Legal, 20th March 2016

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Nuisance calls by ‘ambulance chasers’ soar despite attempts at crackdown – Daily Telegraph

‘One in five people receives an unsolicited, nuisance call every day in a practice fuelled by “ambulance-chasing lawyers,” a report has warned. The compensation culture, which is driven by claims management companies, has soared, despite government attempts to crack down on the practice.’

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Daily Telegraph, 21st March 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Cerys Edwards death: CPS could press criminal charges against driver – The Guardian

Posted March 17th, 2016 in children, dangerous driving, news, personal injuries, prosecutions, sentencing by tracey

‘Prosecutor reviewing whether motorist should face new charges after girl dies nine years after crash left her paralysed.’

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The Guardian, 16th March 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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PI claims more combative in England & Wales than elsewhere, says research – Litigation Futures

Posted March 9th, 2016 in conflict of interest, legal profession, news, personal injuries by tracey

‘The personal injury claims process in England and Wales is combative and often involves inflated opening offers on the claimant side, while claimant lawyers suspect defendants engage in similar tactics such as raising defences they know lack merit, according to academic research.’

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Litigation Futures, 8th March 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Of sink holes and strict liability – Nearly Legal

‘Lafferty v Newark & Sherwood District Council [2016] EWHC 320 (QB). Does section 4(4) of the Defective Premises Act 1972 create a strict liability on the landlord for any defect, such that it covers latent or undetectable defects? The short answer is no. This appeal sets out why.’

Full story

Nearly Legal, 6th March 2016

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk/blog/

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The Child in the Road Part 2 – Zenith PI Blog

‘Six months ago I discussed at some length the issues arising from the decision of the Supreme Court in Jackson v Murray [2015] PIQR P249. More recently in Sabir v Osei-Kwabena [2016] PIQR Q56, the problem cropped up again, this time in the Court of Appeal.’

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Zenith PI, 7th March 2016

Source: www.zenithpi.wordpress.com

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