Pensions Regulator fines first employers for breaches of automatic enrolment duties – OUT-LAW.com

Posted October 30th, 2014 in employment, enforcement, fines, news, pensions, reports by sally

‘The amount of enforcement action taken against employers for non-compliance with their automatic enrolment duties rose considerably in September, according to the Pensions Regulator, which has also recently issued its first fines for breaches.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 29th October 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Calculating Damages for a Lost Career: Sharan Griffin v Plymouth Hospital NHS Trust – Employment Law Blog

‘Harini Iyengar comments on the latest Court of Appeal case on the calculation of damages for a lost career.’

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Employment Law Blog, 25th September 2014

Source: www.employment11kbw.com

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Fee-paid Judicial Pension Scheme – Ministry of Justice

Posted September 22nd, 2014 in consultations, fees, judiciary, news, pensions by sally

‘This consultation seeks views on the proposed design of the Fee-paid Judicial Pension Scheme (FPJPS).’

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Ministry of Justice, 19th September 2014

Source: https://consult.justice.gov.uk

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Judicial Speeches, Gaza Boycotts and Social Media Crimes – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

‘This week, former leaders of the Khmer Rouge face life imprisonment for crimes against humanity committed in Cambodia. In other news, the on-going conflict in Gaza sparks controversy at home, while the Lords inquiry into social media offences reaches an unexpected conclusion.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 18th August 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Graham Gee: Do Lord Chancellors defend judicial independence? – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted August 18th, 2014 in inquiries, judiciary, lord chancellor, news, parliament, pensions, statutory duty by tracey

‘As part of its inquiry into the office of Lord Chancellor, the Constitution Committee asks whether “new” (i.e. post-2003) Lord Chancellors have actually defended judicial independence in line with their customary and now statutory duty to do so. I was asked for examples earlier this summer when appearing before the Committee (with Andrew Le Sueur and Patrick O’Brien). I tried to identify some, but rather garbled my answer. Earlier in the year I also sketched some thoughts about Lord Chancellors in Public Law, but struggled to find clear-cut examples. One reason is that collective cabinet responsibility and the confidentiality of exchanges between Lord Chancellors and judges mean that outsiders will seldom have a full picture of what has occurred behind closed doors. This is unfortunate since my impression is that many lawyers assume—mistakenly, I think—that new Lord Chancellors are neither willing nor able to defend judicial independence. This post is hopefully third time lucky in correcting this assumption. By drawing on press reports, public statements and interviews that Robert Hazell, Kate Malleson, Patrick O’Brien and I conducted between 2011-2013, I want to piece together evidence that suggests that new Lord Chancellors can and do defend judicial independence.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th August 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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MB v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions – WLR Daily

MB v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2014] EWCA Civ 1112; [2014] WLR (D) 355

‘The effect of section 4 of the Gender Recognition Act 2004, which required that a subsisting marriage be annulled prior to the issue of a full gender recognition certificate, and thus to being treated as a woman for pension purposes, did not contravene the principle of equal treatment and was accordingly not discriminatory.’

WLR Daily, 31st July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Arcadia Group Ltd v Arcadia Group Pension Trust Ltd and another – WLR Daily

Posted August 1st, 2014 in indexation, law reports, pensions, trusts by sally

Arcadia Group Ltd v Arcadia Group Pension Trust Ltd and another [2014] EWHC 2683 (Ch); [2014] WLR (D) 354

‘The definition of “retail prices index” in pension scheme documentation operated to confer powers to select an index other than the retail prices index and those powers were not confined to circumstances in which the retail prices index had been discontinued or replaced. Section 67 of the Pensions Act 1995 did not preclude the selection of the consumer prices index for use in connection with benefits derived from past service.’

WLR Daily, 31st July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Transgender person’s claim for female state pension rejected by appeal court – The Guardian

‘A transgender person’s claim to be entitled to receive the female state pension at the age of 60 has been rejected by the appeal court.’

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The Guardian, 31st July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Ballinger and another v Mercer Ltd and another – WLR Daily

Ballinger and another v Mercer Ltd and another; [2014] EWCA Civ 996; [2014] WLR (D) 335

‘Where a claimant applied to introduce a new claim by amendment under CPR r 17.4, and the defendant could show a prima facie defence of limitation, the burden was on the claimant to show that the defence was not reasonably arguable. Amendments seeking to add or substitute a new cause of action would only be permitted if they arose out of the same or substantially the same facts as were already in issue on the existing claims.’

WLR Daily, 17th July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Law Commission clarifies law on pension trust investment – Law Commission

Posted July 1st, 2014 in Law Commission, news, pensions, reports, trusts by sally

‘Pension fund trustees do not have to “maximise returns” in the short-term at the expense of risks over the longer term, according to a report published today by the Law Commission.’

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Law Commission, 1st July 2014

Source: www.lawcommission.justice.gov.uk

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The implications for bankrupts of the recent Budget announcement on pensions: have we gone full circle? – 11 Stone Buildings

Posted June 5th, 2014 in bankruptcy, budgets, news, pensions by sally

‘There has long been a tension between two competing public interests: encouraging individuals to save and provide for their financial security in old age on the one hand and providing recourse for creditors in the event of debtors being unable to pay their debts on the other. Historically, the legislative trend has generally been in favour of the creditor. The Welfare Reform and Pensions Act 1999 (“WRPA 99”), which came into force on 29 May 2000, appeared to provide fundamental changes to the relationship between these two competing policies. In 2012, however, when these reforms came before the court in Raithatha v Williamson the result indicated that WRPA 99 may have been far less significant than was previously supposed. If Williamson was correctly decided, then the changes to pension law introduced in the March 2014 Budget will have effectively unravelled those reforms altogether. Alaric Watson explains.’

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11 Stone Buildings, May 2014

Source: www.11sb.com

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Canoe fraudster John Darwin order to surrender £40,000 to authorities – The Guardian

Posted May 29th, 2014 in fraud, news, pensions, proceeds of crime by michael

‘John Darwin, who faked his own death in a canoeing accident, has been ordered to pay a £40,000 lump sum to the authorities after two of his pensions matured.’

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The Guardian, 29th May 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Court of Appeal upholds Honda’s liability for workplace pensions caused by faulty legal documents – OUT-LAW.com

Posted April 24th, 2014 in appeals, documents, employment, news, pensions by tracey

‘A recent Court of Appeal decision committing car company Honda to between £47 million and £70m in additional pension scheme benefits due to a mistake in one of the documents is “another lesson in the importance of getting pension scheme documents right”, an expert has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 23rd April 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Briggs and others v Gleeds (Head Office) and others – WLR Daily

Posted April 22nd, 2014 in documents, estoppel, execution, law reports, pensions by sally

Briggs and others v Gleeds (Head Office) and others [2014] EWHC 1178 (Ch); [2014] WLR (D) 174

‘A representation of law could found an estoppel by representation. Estoppel could not be invoked where a document did not even appear to comply with the requirements of section 1(3) of the Law of Property (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1989 on its face or where a document needed to be executed by partners and was stated to be signed, sealed and delivered by each partner but none of those signatures were witnessed. Accordingly members of a pension scheme were not estopped from denying that defective deeds were validly executed.’

WLR Daily, 15th April 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Finance and Divorce Update – Family Law Week

Posted April 11th, 2014 in divorce, financial provision, money laundering, news, pensions by sally

‘Jessica Craigs, senior solicitor, and David Salter, Joint Head of Family Law, both of Mills & Reeve LLP analyse the financial remedies and divorce news and cases published in March.’

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Family Law Week, 11th April 2014

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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The Commissioners for H.M Revenue & Customs (Respondents) v Forde and McHugh Limited (Appellants) – Supreme Court

The Commissioners for H.M Revenue & Customs (Respondents) v Forde and McHugh Limited (Appellants) [2014] UKSC 14 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 26th February 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Forde and McHugh Ltd v Revenue and Customs Commissioners – WLR Daily

Posted February 28th, 2014 in law reports, national insurance, pensions, social security by sally

Forde and McHugh Ltd v Revenue and Customs Commissioners [2014] UKSC 14; [2014] WLR (D) 99

‘Contributions made by a company into a funded unapproved retirement benefits scheme in favour of one of its directors did not constitute the director’s “earnings” for the purposes of section 6(1) of the Social Security Contributions and Benefits Act 1992 and thus the company was not liable to pay national insurance contributions in respect of the value of the contribution.’

WLR Daily, 26th February 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Pension Liberation Fraud: The New Kid On The Block – Six Pump Court

Posted February 24th, 2014 in fraud, news, pensions by sally

‘Having a pension fund itself would make most people happy, but liberating one makes it sound even more enticing and for some poor people, too enticing by half as they fall victim to the new fraud which is in vogue at the moment, pension liberation.’

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Six Pump Court, 20th February 2014

Source: www.6pumpcourt.co.uk

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In re West of England Ship Owners Insurance Services Ltd Retirement Benefits Scheme Board of the Pension Protection Fund v Board of the West of England Ship Owners Insurance Services Ltd Retirement Benefits Scheme and another

Posted February 13th, 2014 in law reports, ombudsmen, pensions, third parties, trusts by sally

In re West of England Ship Owners Insurance Services Ltd Retirement Benefits Scheme
Board of the Pension Protection Fund v Board of the West of England Ship Owners Insurance Services Ltd Retirement Benefits Scheme and another [2014] EWHC 20 (Ch); [2014] WLR (D) 58

‘Considerations of fairness and reasonableness could not be imported into the process of construing the provisions of a Levy Determination issued by the Pension Protection Fund (“PPF”) which set out, pursuant to section 175(5) of the Pensions Act 2004, the rules for calculating the annual levy on defined pension benefit schemes eligible to receive compensation from the PPF. If the relevant rule in the Levy Determination did not permit the board of the PPF to interfere in any individual case so as to procure what might be said to be fair or rational in the calculation of the levy, the ombudsman was similarly constrained on a reference.’

WLR Daily, 23rd January 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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“I read it in the newspaper”: The current spate of ancillary relief negligence claims raising near identical section 14A arguments – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2014 in financial provision, limitations, negligence, news, pensions, valuation by sally

‘In ancillary relief proceedings, the largest assets are frequently the divorcing couple’s matrimonial home and pension rights. Whilst it is usually straightforward to ascertain the value of the former, accurately achieving this for the latter can be a highly technical exercise. Solicitors’ alleged failure to analyse pension transfer values is the subject of a spate of negligence claims currently being brought by former clients. No case is yet to be reported, but it is expected that a number will be during 2014.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 13th January 2014

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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